Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I try to create a simple illustration using XML layer-list drawable. I have two shapes, a circle and a rectangle I want a circle not to scale. The following is the layout

<LinearLayout
xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
android:orientation="vertical"
android:layout_width="fill_parent"
android:layout_height="fill_parent"
>

    <ImageView
        android:layout_margin="10dp"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:src="@drawable/shape5"
        android:layout_gravity="center"
        android:scaleType="center"
        />

And this is the shape5.xml drawable

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<item android:top="0dp" android:left="0dp">
    <shape android:shape="rectangle" android:scaleType="center">
        <stroke android:width="2dp" android:color="@android:color/holo_red_light" />
        <size android:width="200dp" android:height="100dp"/>
    </shape>
</item>

<item android:top="10dp" android:left="10dp">
    <shape android:shape="oval" android:gravity="center" android:scaleType="center" >
        <stroke android:width="2dp" android:color="@android:color/holo_blue_light" />
        <corners android:radius="10dp" />
        <size android:width="20dp" android:height="20dp"/>

    </shape>
</item>

The resulting drawing looks like this:

screenshot of the rendered activity

it is clear that item android:top does the work, but nothing prevents shape from scaling. size width does not work, android:scaleType="center" does not work either.

I looked quickly at LayerDrawable.java implementation. Seems like behind the scenes an inset is created from item attributes. So I guess by calculating those I can achieve the result, I want. Is that the only way?

Update:

As per this answer, I knew that manipulating item's android:top, android:left etc, I can create a virtual inset that will scale my "shapes" as I want them. I checked this, and it is correct. So it is a workaround. I however am sorely disappointed with how counter-intuitive it is. I still hope someone can point me to a simple way to disable scaling.

Update: As per this Google Android documentation page, setting ImageView scaleType should have prevented scaling. Apparently in my case it did not work. Something is missing.

share|improve this question
    
Keep it square... width=height. –  Der Gol...lum Mar 31 '14 at 17:18
    
Vyger, not sure what you mean. Please elaborate –  Michael Kariv Mar 31 '14 at 18:12
    
A shape container is a rectangle. A square is an exception to a rectangle, where width and height are equal. So the inscribed circle (or another shape) will keep a square aspect, when the w/h ratio is 1. –  Der Gol...lum Mar 31 '14 at 18:15
    
Vyger, what if I want to draw a rectangle and on one side of it a perfect circle (not ellipse which is a stretched circle. How do I go about it, in your opinion? Sample of a code would be nice –  Michael Kariv Mar 31 '14 at 18:34
    
I'd use 2 separate things, then. Which will look like one - we don't tell it to anybody. You make a "square" that holds a circle, without borders. This drawable is then put inside a TextView as a compound Drawable (best practice!). The textView has a background, which in turn is a 9 patch (so it stretches perfectly with the TextView's size), as its border. So, it's done. You can put the circle drawable against one of the inner sides of the TextView and have a rectangle with color border around it. You can also have some text (if the case) and have it react to clicks, too - like a button. –  Der Gol...lum Mar 31 '14 at 18:41

1 Answer 1

Give your circle drawable the same height and width like so:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
  android:shape="oval" >
    <solid 
      android:color="@color/grey" />
    <size 
      android:width="16dp"
      android:height="16dp"/>
</shape>

The values you put as height and width do not matter too much, the important thing is that height = width. Think of them as aspect ratio and you want a ratio for a perfect circle, which is 1:1.

The reason you don't have to worry about the exact values is because the drawable will scale via the scaleType attribute.

Once you have inserted the drawable into your ImageView you can set the scaleType to scale it:

scaleType = fitCenter -> Drawable will be the same size as the ImageView but will stay a perfect circle! scaleType = centerInside -> Drawable will be height and width you specified in the parameter etc ...

Hope this helps!

Edit: I just saw, that the question is 5 months old and I guess you have figured out a solution by now. If this answer helps you, please accept it anyway so everyone who is searching for the same topic can have an answer!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.