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I'm not sure why, but for some reason, the following code skips the else condition. I've tried just about everything I can think of, including switching the code blocks, but it still skips the else part. Basically, I want this method to return String temp = "no" if String docID that is passed to the method is not found in the FILESTATUS database, and String temp = "yes" if it is found.

static String checkDocID(String docID)
{
    String temp = null;

    System.out.println("Checking if data already exists in database...");
    try
    {
        Main.stmt = Main.con.createStatement();
        String command = "SELECT * FROM FILESTATUS WHERE ID='" + docID + "'";
        ResultSet queryResult = Main.stmt.executeQuery(command);
        if (!queryResult.next())
        {
            temp = "no";
        }
        else
        {
            while (queryResult.next())
            {
                String result = queryResult.getString("ID");
                if (result.equals(docID))
                {
                    temp = "yes";
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        Main.stmt.close();
    }
    catch (Exception ex) {ex.printStackTrace();}
    return temp;
}

Thanks!

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Usually resource that require an explicit call to a close() method are closed inside a finally block. Just a little friendly advice. –  Tim Bender Feb 16 '10 at 22:57
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5 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Because you end up calling queryResult.next() in the "if" and again in the while, you're skipping the first result. If there is only one result, the while loop will never execute.

If I can make a couple of suggestions:

  • Use bound variables in a PreparedStatement rather than putting "docID" in the query string
  • Don't test result.equals(docID) since the query already assured that.
  • prefer boolean to String "yes" or "no"
  • set the result to "no" or false, then set it to "yes" or true in the loop. The extra assignment is probably faster than the extra test, plus you can skip the do{}while which most people find harder to read.
share|improve this answer
    
concise and correct –  Andrew Duffy Feb 16 '10 at 22:38
    
it's probably worth pointing out that ResultSet.next is not like Iterator.hasNext –  Andrew Duffy Feb 16 '10 at 22:39
    
Wow - I figured it was just a case of my logical brain taking a vacation. Solved it using a do{}-while{} as opposed to just a while{}, as suggested by splix. Thank you! –  ryantmer Feb 16 '10 at 22:45
    
I am surprised that this isn't accepted. It covers all of the unnecessary clutter in the code logic (expect of closing in finally). Maybe because you omitted the code sample? –  BalusC Feb 17 '10 at 2:25
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Might be better to restructure this loop as:

static String checkDocId(String docId) {
    String temp = "no";

    while (queryResult.next()) {                
        String result = queryResult.getString("ID");

        if (result.equals(docID)) {
            temp = "yes";
            break;
        }
    }

    return temp;
}

Some people don't like using break (I usually don't) so you can use a boolean in your while (I find that it reads more like english and you can tell the terminating condition right from the while instead of looking for an if inside):

static String checkDocId(String docId) {
    boolean found = false;

    while (queryResult.next() && !found) {
        String result = queryResult.getString("ID");
        found = result.equals(docID);
    }

    return found ? "yes" : "no";
}

You're performing a needless comparison otherwise. Remember, a while is just an if with a goto at the end ;)

As far as your problem is concerned, what Paul said is correct. Eitherway, I would still restructure the loop so that it's more elegant.

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1  
why not just return "yes" as soon as result is found. –  irreputable Feb 17 '10 at 0:28
    
That would mean you need another return outside the loop. I'm not a fan of multiple returns unless absolutely necessary. 9 times out of 10, you can rewrite your algorithm to be more elegant and remove the use of multiple returns. –  Vivin Paliath Feb 17 '10 at 0:32
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rs.next() rolling current cursor after each call

try with

static String checkDocID(String docID)
{
    String temp = null;

    System.out.println("Checking if data already exists in database...");
    try
    {
        Main.stmt = Main.con.createStatement();
        String command = "SELECT * FROM FILESTATUS WHERE ID='" + docID + "'";
        ResultSet queryResult = Main.stmt.executeQuery(command);
        boolean found = queryResult.next();
        if (!found)
        {
            temp = "no";
        }
        else
        {
            do {
                String result = queryResult.getString("ID");
                if (result.equals(docID))
                {
                    temp = "yes";
                    break;
                }
            } while (queryResult.next())
        }
        Main.stmt.close();
    }
    catch (Exception ex) {ex.printStackTrace();}
    return temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly - just changing it to do {} while {} was all it needed. Thanks! –  ryantmer Feb 16 '10 at 22:44
3  
It may work, but this code would be what others might call a minor WTF. Paul gave the real answer to the problem and vivin has a much better code implementation. –  Tim Bender Feb 16 '10 at 22:55
    
Agree with Tim regarding the WTF'ness of the accepted solution. –  Vivin Paliath Feb 16 '10 at 23:10
    
Although vivin's would work too, I only had to change two lines to get this (and I'm lazy!). Are there any major problems with this code? (If it makes any difference, stability is more important than speed/efficiency with this code.) Thanks! –  ryantmer Feb 16 '10 at 23:59
    
If you want your code to be stable and maintainable then I would not go with the current solution. Using the current structure is what led you to this problem in the first place. Using the while without the if is far more maintainable. Laziness is not an excuse. You cannot be lazy and write stable/maintainable code! –  Vivin Paliath Feb 17 '10 at 2:02
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You are calling queryResult.next twice before you are trying to read it. To prove this, put a println or something right after the else (before the while).

Since you are selecting by a particular ID, moving to next() twice will in fact fail the second time (presumably) and never execute the while block.

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After a bit astonishment about the code (leaking DB resources, not trusting the DB that it returns the right docID, doing a SELECT * while you don't need all of the columns at all, not taking benefit of SQL-injection-sanitization powers of PreparedStatement, using String instead of boolean to denote a true/false value, a messy code flow), here's how it should really be done instead:

private static final String SQL_EXIST_DOCID = 
    "SELECT id FROM filestatus WHERE id = ?";

public boolean exist(String docID) throws SQLException {
    Connection connection = null;
    PreparedStatement statement = null;
    ResultSet resultSet = null;
    boolean exist = false;

    try {
        connection = database.getConnection();
        statement = connection.prepareStatement(SQL_EXIST_DOCID);
        statement.setString(1, docID); // Shouldn't it be a Long instead? Characterbased PK's are *far* from efficient.
        resultSet = statement.executeQuery();
        exist = resultSet.next();
    } finally {
        if (resultSet != null) try { resultSet.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
        if (statement != null) try { statement.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
        if (connection != null) try { connection.close(); } catch (SQLException logOrIgnore) {}
    }

    return exist;
}

Clear, concise and simple as that. For more insights about using basic JDBC the right way you may find this article useful. I hope that you take it serious to learn from it. Really.

share|improve this answer
    
I personally like your answer the best but to be pedantic there is no good reason to put the connection creation inside the try/catch and at least two reasons not to. 1) it makes the finally block needless complicated for connection, 2) if the try {} block gets large and some joker manages to set connection = null then you'll never close it... versus getting an NPE. –  PSpeed Feb 17 '10 at 5:22
    
1) can be refactored away, 2) is a programmer error. Certainly the connection should be closed in the finally, else you're leaking resources. –  BalusC Feb 17 '10 at 11:01
    
Although I cannot use your code exactly (as the connection is already established at this point, and needs to remain open past this point), you did open my eyes to several problems with my code... A software engineer I am not! Thanks! –  ryantmer Feb 17 '10 at 15:52
    
You're welcome. You can in theory also replace getConnection() by getTransaction(). –  BalusC Feb 17 '10 at 16:02
    
@BalusC, yes the connection should be closed in the finally but it should not be created in the try... if you get an exception from create there will never be a connection to close. Why create extra complexity/problems? –  PSpeed Feb 17 '10 at 20:02
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