Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am converting a USGS elevation raster data set to a Numpy array and then trying to select a position in the array at random. From this position I would like to create a method that identifies the eight surrounding cells to see if the elevations of these cells are within one meter of randomly selected cell.

This is where it gets a little more complex...if a neighbor is within one meter then the same method will be called on it and the process repeats until there is no longer cells within a meter of elevation or the number of cells selected reaches a prescribed limit.

If this is unclear hopefully this 2d array example below will make more sense. The bold/italicized cell (35) was randomly selected, the method was called on it (selecting all eight of its neighbors), and then the method was called on all neighbors until no more cells could be selected (all bold numbers were selected).

33 33 33 37 38 37 43 40

33 33 33 38 38 38 44 40

36 36 36 36 38 39 44 41

35 36 35 35 34 30 40 41

36 36 35 35 34 30 30 41

38 38 35 35 34 30 30 41

I am fairly good at java and know how to write a method to achieve this purpose, however GIS is primarily python based. I am in the process of learning python and have generated some code, but am having major problems adapting python to the GIS scripting interface.

Thanks for any help!

Question continued...

Thanks for the answer Bas Swinckels. I tried to incorporate your code into the code I have written up so far and ended up getting a infinite loop. Below is what I have written up. There are two main steps I need to overcome to make this work. This is an example of my array generated from my raster (-3.40e+38 is the no data value).

>>> 
[[ -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38 ...,  -3.40282306e+38
   -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38]
 [ -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38 ...,  -3.40282306e+38
   -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38]
 [ -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38 ...,  -3.40282306e+38
   -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38]
 ..., 
 [ -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38 ...,  -3.40282306e+38
   -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38]
 [ -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38 ...,  -3.40282306e+38
   -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38]
 [ -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38 ...,  -3.40282306e+38
   -3.40282306e+38  -3.40282306e+38]]
The script took 0.457999944687seconds.
>>> 

What I need to do is randomly select a position(cell) within this array and then run the code you generated on this point, let the flood fill algorithm grow until it maxes out like in the example above or until it reaches a prescribed number of cells (the user can set that no flood fill algorithm selection will be over 25 selected cells). Than ideally, new selected cells would be outputted as a single raster maintaining its georefrenced structure.

#import modules
from osgeo import gdal
import numpy as np
import os, sys, time

#start timing
startTime = time.time()

#register all of drivers
gdal.AllRegister()

#get raster
geo = gdal.Open("C:/Users/Harmon_work/Desktop/Python_Scratch/all_fill.img")

#read raster as array
arr = geo.ReadAsArray()
data = geo.ReadAsArray(0, 0, geo.RasterXSize, geo.RasterYSize).astype(np.float)
print data

#get image size
rows = geo.RasterYSize
cols = geo.RasterXSize
bands = geo.RasterCount

#get georefrence info
transform = geo.GetGeoTransform()
xOrgin = transform[0]
yOrgin = transform[3]
pixelWidth = transform[1]
pixelHeight = transform[5]

#get array dimensions
row = data.shape[0]
col = data.shape[1]

#get random position in array
randx = random.randint(1, row)
randy = random.randint(1, col)
print randx, randy

neighbours = [(-1,-1), (-1,0), (-1,1), (0,1), (1,1), (1,0), (1,-1), (0,-1)]
mask = np.zeros_like(data, dtype = bool)

#start coordinate
stack = [(randx,randy)]

while stack:
    x, y = stack.pop()
    mask[x, y] = True
    for dx, dy in neighbours:
        nx, ny = x + dx, y + dy
        if (0 <= nx < data.shape[0] and 0 <= ny < data.shape[1]
            and not mask[nx, ny] and abs(data[nx, ny] - data[x, y]) <= 1):
            stack.append((nx, ny))

for line in mask:
    print ''.join('01'[i] for i in line)

#run time
endTime = time.time()
print 'The script took ' + str(endTime-startTime) + 'seconds.'

Thanks again for your help. Please ask me questions if anything is unclear.

share|improve this question
1  
Just to clarify, if the element with value 39 were instead 34, would it have been selected, since it is one of the 34's eight neighbors? In other words, can the region grow diagonally? –  askewchan Apr 1 at 3:10
1  
Yes, the region can grow diagonally. If 39 was changed to 34 the cell should be selected. Thanks for the clarification. –  rharmony Apr 1 at 5:42
1  
Similar question: If one of the cells with value 30 were instead 33, would this a) be selected because it is within one meter of 34, or would it b) not be selected because it is not within one meter of the original value 35? –  Mr E Apr 1 at 12:54
3  
Also, do you need to call the method on each cell before expanding? It's probably more efficient with numpy to identify the region and then call a vectorized method on all the elements. Either way you seem to be describing a region growing / flood fill algorithm. –  Mr E Apr 1 at 12:59
1  
Thanks for the question MrE. If one of the cells with value 30 was instead 33 it would be selected because it is within one meter of 34. –  rharmony Apr 1 at 17:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This can be done with an algorithm similar to flood fill, using a stack:

import numpy as np

z = '''33 33 33 37 38 37 43 40
33 33 33 38 38 38 44 40
36 36 36 36 38 39 44 41
35 36 35 35 34 30 40 41
36 36 35 35 34 30 30 41
38 38 35 35 34 30 30 41'''
z = np.array([[int(i) for i in line.split()] for line in z.splitlines()])

neighbours = [(-1,-1), (-1,0), (-1,1), (0,1), (1,1), (1,0), (1,-1), (0,-1)]
mask = np.zeros_like(z, dtype = bool)
stack = [(3,2)] # push start coordinate on stack

while stack:
    x, y = stack.pop()
    mask[x, y] = True
    for dx, dy in neighbours:
        nx, ny = x + dx, y + dy
        if (0 <= nx < z.shape[0] and 0 <= ny < z.shape[1] 
            and not mask[nx, ny] and abs(z[nx, ny] - z[x, y]) <= 1):
            stack.append((nx, ny))

for line in mask:
    print ''.join('01'[i] for i in line)    

Result:

00000000
00000000
11110000
11111000
11111000
00111000
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer Bas I updated my question and hoping you will have some advice. Thanks again! –  rharmony Apr 2 at 21:21
    
Hi Bas. Also I just realized the one problem with my no data value. When a position in the array is chosen and it happens to be a no data value all other no data values would be selected. I need to have the code ignore these values. –  rharmony Apr 3 at 20:31
    
Then add an extra check in the long if-statement to exclude them. –  Bas Swinckels Apr 3 at 20:34
    
Thanks Bas. At this point I think I fully understand your code its beautiful haha. There is one last thing I am trying to figure out. For stack[(3,2)] it ultimately ends up finding 17 cells within our requirements. Can you think of a way to stop the while loop after lets say 12 cells were found. I have been playing around with while(stack.__len__() < some#), but figured out this doesn't work due to the way cells are appended. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks again! –  rharmony Apr 3 at 23:27
    
Simply set a counter to zero before the while loop, increment it either when processing a cell or when adding a neighbor, and finally break out of the while loop or stop adding neighbors when the counter is greater than some threshold. –  Bas Swinckels Apr 4 at 7:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.