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I have a bash script abcd.sh,in which I want to kill this command(/usr/local/bin/wrun 'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat') after 5 sec but in this script it kill sleep command after 5 second.

#!/bin/sh
/usr/local/bin/wrun 'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat' &
sleep 5
kill $! 2>/dev/null && echo "Killed command on time out"
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Try

#!/bin/sh
/usr/local/bin/wrun 'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat' &
pid=$!
sleep 5
kill $pid 2>/dev/null && echo "Killed command on time out"

UPDATE:

A working example (no special commands)

#!/bin/sh
set +x
ping -i 1 google.de &
pid=$!
echo $pid
sleep 5
echo $pid
kill $pid 2>/dev/null && echo "Killed command on time out"
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+1 This solves the immediate issue in the shell script. Using timeout is arguably a better option. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 1 '14 at 5:56
    
+1 for quick solution without not much changing OP script. –  Jayesh Apr 1 '14 at 6:10
    
@drkunibar script not working,script runs command after 5 seconds –  Tomas Apr 1 '14 at 6:42
    
Sorry, but I can't reproduce your problem. What command starts after 5 seconds? I have updated my answer with an example that should work on every system (changed your command with a ping) –  drkunibar Apr 1 '14 at 7:00
    
@drkunibar /usr/local/bin/wrun 'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat' resume its working.After 5 sec it shows the echo message and resume its working. –  Tomas Apr 1 '14 at 7:16

You should use instead the timeout(1) command:

timeout 5 /usr/local/bin/wrun \
      'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat'
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1  
+1, this is the correct answer for systems that ship with timeout. Sadly, timeout was only introduced in coreutils 7 which means it's not available on e.g. CentOS 5. –  Adrian Frühwirth Apr 1 '14 at 8:31
    
neither on ubuntu 10.04 –  slayedbylucifer Apr 1 '14 at 9:08

Rather then try and construct your own mechanism why not make use of the timeout command.

Example

$ date; timeout 5 sleep 100; date
Tue Apr  1 03:19:56 EDT 2014
Tue Apr  1 03:20:01 EDT 2014

In the above you can see that timeout has terminated the sleep 100 after only 5 seconds (aka. the duration).

Your example

$ timeout 5 /usr/local/bin/wrun \
    'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat'
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Try this:

#!/bin/sh
/usr/local/bin/wrun 'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat' &
sleep 5
pkill "wrun" && echo "Killed command on time out"
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This is because the variable $! contains the PID of the most recent background command. And this background command is in your case sleep 5. This should work:

#!/bin/sh
/usr/local/bin/wrun 'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat' &
PID=$!
sleep 5
kill $PID 2>/dev/null && echo "Killed command on time out"
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Right, background command. Sleep is not being executed in the background. –  jordanm Apr 1 '14 at 6:14
    
@chaos script not working.script runs command after 5 seconds –  tomas jindal Apr 1 '14 at 6:38
    
What is /usr/local/bin/wrun? Is it this gist.github.com/orgoj/5326037 ? –  chaos Apr 1 '14 at 6:54

You could use something like:

#!/bin/sh
/usr/local/bin/wrun 'uptime;ps -elf|grep httpd|wc -l;free -m;mpstat' &
PID=`ps -ef | grep /usr/local/bin/wrun | awk '{print $1}'`
sleep 5
kill $PID 2>/dev/null && echo "Killed command on time out"
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