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var name = 'world';
(function () {
    if (typeof name === 'undefined') {
        console.log('Goodbye ' + name);
    } else {
        console.log('Hello ' + name);
    }
})();

when I evaluate the above program, the result is Hello world!, which is expected because the global variable scope, but when I evaluate the follow program:

var name = 'world';
(function () {
    if (typeof name === 'undefined') {
        var name = 'Jack';
        console.log('Goodbye ' + name);
    } else {
        console.log('Hello ' + name);
    }
})();

the result is Goodbye Jack, why the result of typeof name === 'undefined' is true in this case?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because variable declarations are hoisted to the top of the scope in which they appear. This is how your code is interpreted:

(function () {
    var name; // Implicitly has the value 'undefined'
    if (typeof name === 'undefined') {
        name = 'Jack'; // Doesn't change from 'undefined' until this line
        console.log('Goodbye ' + name);
    } else {
        console.log('Hello' + name);
    }
})();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it's very interesting, why Javascript use this method to interprete program? It seems not the normal way to evaluate statements. – zbtong Apr 1 '14 at 8:27
    
@zbtong, it has to do with the decision to use function scoping. – Paul Draper Apr 1 '14 at 8:37
    
I see, Javascript hasn't block scope, so it must use this method to use function scope, thanks very much. – zbtong Apr 1 '14 at 8:41

On line 3 you have var name = 'Jack'.

The var name part is hoisted so you have a local variable scoped to the function.

The name = 'Jack' part is not hoisted.

On line 2 you test the value of name.

Line 2 is before line 3, so it hasn't had 'Jack' assigned yet, so it is undefined.

share|improve this answer

In Javascript function declarations (like function f() {}), and var declarations are "hoisted".

They are declared for the scope of the function (though setting the variable to Jack stays where your wrote it).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much. – zbtong Apr 1 '14 at 8:30

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