Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've declared a template class MyContainer as bellow, then created an instance of it of type DataType1. The DataType1 class provides a friend function "DataSpecificComparison" which is used by std::sort to compare DataType1 objects. The program compiled and sorted correctly.

I then defined a class called DataType2, gave it a friend implementation of "DataSpecificComparison" and used it to create another instance of MyContainer.

I am now unable to compile the program as a "C2914: 'std::sort' : cannot deduce template argument as function argument is ambiguous" compile time error is reported.

How can a developer specify that the DataSpecificComparison binary predicate is to take arguments of template type T*? Or is there another way around this issue?

template <class T>
class MyContainer
{
private: 
    vector<T*> m_vMyContainerObjects;
    ....

public:
    ....
    void SortMyContainerObjects()
    {
        std::sort(m_vMyContainerObjects.begin(), m_vMyContainerObjects.end(), DataSpecificComparison)
    }
}


class DataType1
{
    ....
    friend bool DataSpecificComparison(const DataType1 * lhs, const DataType1 * rhs)
}

class DataType2
{
    ....
    friend bool DataSpecificComparison(const DataType2* lhs, const DataType2* rhs)
}
share|improve this question
1  
Maybe it is because you are using a vector of pointers? Just a guess. –  Justin Peel Feb 17 '10 at 6:02
    
When I had only defined MyContainer<DataType1>, and it's friend function "DataSpecificComparison" the App compiled and ran. It was when DataType2 was defined and an instance of MyContainer<DataType2> created that this error occurred. As an aside - my first attempt at this solution involved using std::sort, but not implementing a user defined Binary Predicate - I simply overloaded the default less than (<) operator with a DataType1 implementation. However because I was sorting pointers instead of objects, the pointers within m_vMyContainerObjects were sorted by their address. –  DanielD Feb 17 '10 at 8:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use a temporary local function pointer variable of the required type to select the correct overload of DataSpecificComparison:

void SortMyContainerObjects()
{
    typedef bool (*comparer_t)(const T*, const T*);
    comparer_t cmp = &DataSpecificComparison;
    std::sort(m_vMyContainerObjects.begin(), m_vMyContainerObjects.end(), cmp);
}

Here the compiler can deduce that you want to use the DataSpecificComparison overload that matches the comparer_t type, which resolves the ambiguity.

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent, that works correctly for the App I described above. –  DanielD Feb 17 '10 at 7:58

sth already gave a correct answer, but there's also a direct alternative based on the same principle:

void SortMyContainerObjects()
{

    std::sort(m_vMyContainerObjects.begin(), m_vMyContainerObjects.end(),
       static_cast<bool (*comparer_t)(const T*, const T*)>(&DataSpecificComparison));
}

This uses essentially the same mechanism. The cast forces overload resolution to happen before the Template Argument Deduction for std::sort.

share|improve this answer
template<typename T>
struct DataSpecificComp : public binary_function<T, T, bool>
{
public:
    bool operator()(const T* lhs, const T* rhs)
    {
        return *lhs < *rhs;
    }
};

call the sort function as shown below:

sort(vi.begin(), vi.end(), DataSpecificComp<int>());
share|improve this answer

I'd prefer something along the following lines: by default it compares objects with less_than (so you wouldn't have to remember to provide a function with a funny name), and there's an overload that allows giving your own comparison functor (again, value-based):

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

template <class T, class Func>
struct indirect_binary_call_type: public std::binary_function<const T*, const T*, bool>
{
    Func f;
    indirect_binary_call_type(Func f): f(f) {}
    bool operator()(const T* a, const T* b) const
    {
        return f(*a, *b); 
    } 
};

template <class T, class Func>
indirect_binary_call_type<T, Func> indirect_binary_call(Func f)
{
    return indirect_binary_call_type<T, Func>(f);
}

template <class T>
class MyContainer
{
private: 
    std::vector<T*> m_vMyContainerObjects;

public:
    void Sort()
    {
        Sort(std::less<T>());
    }
    template <class Func>
    void Sort(Func f )
    {
        std::sort(m_vMyContainerObjects.begin(), m_vMyContainerObjects.end(), indirect_binary_call<T>(f));
    }

};

int main()
{
    MyContainer<int> m;
    m.Sort();
    m.Sort(std::greater<int>());
}
share|improve this answer

Did you try defining DataSpecificComparison as template with bunch of specializations and giving it the type?

template<T>
bool DataSpecificComparison(const T* t1, const T* t2)
{
    // something non compilable here
}

template<> bool DataSpecificComparison<Data1>(const Data1* t1, const Data1* t2)
{
    // return *t1 < *t2;
}

....
void SortMyContainerObjects()
{
    std::sort(m_vMyContainerObjects.begin(), m_vMyContainerObjects.end(), DataSpecificComparison<T>)
}
....
share|improve this answer

Templating DataSpecificComparison should work. You can also specifically call the proper std::sort template, but it's a bit cumbersome:

template <class T>
class MyContainer
{
private: 
    vector<T*> m_vMyContainerObjects;
    typedef bool (*compsT)(T, T); 

public:
    ....
    void SortMyContainerObjects()
    {
        std::sort<std::vector<T*>::iterator, compsT>(m_vMyContainerObjects.begin(), m_vMyContainerObjects.end(), DataSpecificComparison);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution works with some tweaking to the typedef statement: typedef bool (compsT)(const T, const T*); –  DanielD Feb 17 '10 at 8:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.