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I am stucked in writing domain logic for domain model.

I am new to DDD and have read some articles for DDD. I have collected some of the domain objects for our project, but I can't figure out what does domain logic mean?

I have a domain model class named "Account".

As the user register for their new account, they have to select one of the two types of account in our Project.

Let's say one account type is Personal and the another is Business.

The Account model class is shown below:

public class Account
    {
            private AccountType _accountType;
            private string _userRole;
            private Address _address;
            private BusinessInfo _businessInfo;
            private string _contactPhoneNumber;
            private string _citizenshipCountryCode;
            private DateTime _dateOfBirth;
            private string _emailAddress;
            private string _preferredLanguage;
            private string _registrationType;
            private DateTime _createdDateTime;
    }

I have not posted my full class, but above are the attributes of Account domain.

If the user selects the business account, he had to fill business info details else no need.

Based on my situation how could I select the domain logic for account domain class.

What are the ideas or how should I select the domain logic basically?

Any help would be appreciable.

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4 Answers 4

2 me it sounds as if you have different types of accounts and they all have some common parts but also some parts specific to each type.

Have you thought about making an base account class with the common stuff and create specific account types that inherit from this base class instead?

The base class may take all necessary information as arguments in its constructor and expose common operations..

Likewise the specialized class (BusinessAccount?) could take whatever necessary on top of the common stuff as arguments in its constructor..

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i declared account type as Enum and what you have said is to divide the Account class to PersonalAccount and BusinessAccount, right? –  RajeshKannan Apr 1 at 19:35
    
@oakman That way you'll make it hard to change the account type in the future. Is that reasonable? It depends. –  Bartłomiej Szypelow Apr 2 at 12:29
    
@RajeshKannan, yes that is what I suggest. However as Bartlomiej points out, it depends... –  oakman Apr 3 at 7:58

but I can't figure out what does domain logic mean?

Everything that's directly related to problems you are dealing with. And with problems I mean that part of problems Your customer is talking about.

Technical things like 'how to display this account?' or 'how to retrieve account data from by database?' should be separated from domain logic such as 'is this account expired?', 'does this account has special privileges?', 'stuff that happens when we close an account' etc.

Hardest part of writing domain logic is finding ways on how to decouple this technical part which for your customer makes not much more sense than MAGIC. In some sense - it will be just a model after all, you need some means to reflect it (programming language itself for example).

What you should end up with is neatly written rule set that closely follows language your customer is speaking in.

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Based on my situation how could I select the domain logic for account domain class.

What are the ideas or how should I select the domain logic basically?

My general rule:

Everything that is related to Target Domain of the software and isn't an infrastructure (Data Access or Application layers) or GUI (Presentation Layer) could be considered as Domain Logic.

Domain logic can be placed into Entities, Value Objects, Aggregates, Domain Services, Domain Events, Factories.

According to the Domain-Driven Design by Eric Evans there are building blocks of DDD:

  1. Layered Architecture. It is used to isolate Domain Model and Domain Logic from Persistence Layer and Presentation Layer
  2. Entities (building block of your Domain Model that implements Domain Logic)
  3. Value Objects (building block of your Domain Model that implements Domain Logic)
  4. Domain Events (Domain Logic that is performed by 'experts' when they are notified)
  5. Services (Domain Logic that is not responsibility of any entity)
  6. Modules
  7. Aggregates (building block of your Domain Model that implements Domain Logic)
  8. Repositories. They provides an illusion of in-memory collections.
  9. Factories. Domain Logic that is responsible for creating instances of complex objects.

So, I would design it the following way:

  • Account is an abstract class and PersonalAccount and BusinessAccount classes inherit it.

  • AccountFactory is used in order to create complex object (either PersonalAccount or BusinessAccount).

  • UI or Application Logic use AccountFactory to create an Account using data provided by user.

  • you can also introduce additional Value Objects in order group properties of you Account more naturally for business users and use ubiquitous language for it.

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Basically you need a AccountingProcessingRules Class that accept different type Account class and process accordingly. When you do this you can specify two sets of rules for each account type, one for personal and one for business.

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