Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How do I determine the dependencies of a .NET application? Does Dependency Walker work with managed apps? I've downloaded the latest and tried profiling the app, but it just exits without much of an explanation. If it doesn't work with .NET, then is there some other tool that would help me debug a run-time DLL loading issue?

share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Dependency walker works on normal win32 binaries. All .NET dll's and exe's have a small stub header part which makes them look like normal binaries, but all it basically says is "load the CLR" - so that's all that dependency walker will tell you.

To see which things your .NET app actually relies on, you can use the tremendously excellent .NET reflector from red gate.

Load your DLL into it, right click, and chose 'Analyze' - you'll then see a "Depends On" item which will show you all the other dll's (and methods inside those dll's) that it needs.

It can sometimes get trickier though, in that your app depends on X dll, and X dll is present, but for whatever reason can't be loaded or located at runtime.

To troubleshoot those kinds of issues, Microsoft have an Assembly Binding Log Viewer which can show you what's going on at runtime

share|improve this answer
    
I think you missed a little of that URL - the .aspx got put in the link text. I managed to find it though. – Brian Stewart Oct 23 '08 at 0:33
    
oh... yeah the markdown control eats brackets in URL's, and unfortunately MSDN puts (VS80) in all it's url's :-( – Orion Edwards Oct 27 '08 at 4:12
32  
Note that as of early 2011, .NET Reflector is no longer free. The open source ILSpy project is very similar. – yoyo Feb 21 '12 at 5:09
1  
Assembly Binding Log View v4.0.30319.1 is utterly unusable. Log entries are not displayed in chronological order and you cannot sort them. It displays paths which do not fit in the viewer and you cannot resize it. It's a complete waste of time. – Neutrino Aug 28 '13 at 14:42
    
dependencywalker.com You should include urls of things you mention, esp. if they work. – toddmo Nov 15 '13 at 17:17

Open the assembly file in ILDASM and look @ the .assembly extern in the MANIFEST

share|improve this answer
    
Can I see the version of the dependent assemblies this way too? I only see the dependency name, not it's version as well. – Michael R Mar 10 at 19:21
    
Actually, yes, I can see the version of the dependent assemblies this way too, upon clicking "M A N I F E S T" – Michael R Mar 10 at 19:26

To do static dependencies evaluation of .NET code, you can use the tool NDepend. It comes with a dependency matrix, some graph and also a language dedicated to get information from your code base. See more info here.

share|improve this answer
1  
Patrick should probably have mentioned he's the author of that fantastic tool ;). It's really worth checking out. +1 for writing it! – Mitch Wheat Nov 21 '08 at 9:30
1  
Hey, I just noticed this myself. I enjoy reading his blog posts - I'll have to try out NDepend! – Brian Stewart Dec 17 '08 at 21:19

Enable assembly binding logging set the registry value EnableLog in HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Fusion to 1. Note that you have to restart your application (use iisreset) for the changes to have any effect.

Tip: Remember to turn off fusion logging when you are done since there is a performance penalty to have it turned on.

share|improve this answer

If you are using the Mono toolchain, you can use the monodis utility with the --assemblyref argument to list the dependencies of a .NET assembly. This will work on both .exe and .dll files.

Example usage:

monodis --assemblyref somefile.exe

Example output (.exe):

$ monodis --assemblyref monop.exe
AssemblyRef Table
1: Version=4.0.0.0
    Name=System
    Flags=0x00000000
    Public Key:
0x00000000: B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89
2: Version=4.0.0.0
    Name=mscorlib
    Flags=0x00000000
    Public Key:
0x00000000: B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89

Example output (.dll):

$ monodis --assemblyref Mono.CSharp.dll
AssemblyRef Table
1: Version=4.0.0.0
    Name=mscorlib
    Flags=0x00000000
    Public Key:
0x00000000: B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89
2: Version=4.0.0.0
    Name=System.Core
    Flags=0x00000000
    Public Key:
0x00000000: B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89
3: Version=4.0.0.0
    Name=System
    Flags=0x00000000
    Public Key:
0x00000000: B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89
4: Version=4.0.0.0
    Name=System.Xml
    Flags=0x00000000
    Public Key:
0x00000000: B7 7A 5C 56 19 34 E0 89
share|improve this answer

http://www.amberfish.net/

ChkAsm will show you all the dependencies of a particular assembly at once, including the versions, and easily let you search for assemblies in the list. Works much better for this purpose than ILSpy (http://ilspy.net/), which is what I used to use for this task.

share|improve this answer

I find the small utility AsmSpy an invaluable tool to for resolving issues with loading assemblies. It lists all assembly references of managed assemblies including assembly versions.

Run it in a command prompt in the directory of the .dll with the following arguments:

asmspy . all

asmspy output screenshot

share|improve this answer

You don't need to download and install shareware apps or tools. You can do it programitically from .NET using Assembly.GetReferencedAssemblies()

Assembly.LoadFile(@"app").GetReferencedAssemblies()
share|improve this answer

It's funny I had a similar issue and didn't find anything suitable and was aware of good old Dependency Walker so in the end I wrote one myself.

This deals with .NET specifically and will show what references an assembly has (and missing) recursively. It'll also show native library dependencies.

It's free (for personal use) and available here for anyone interested: www.netdepends.com

www.netdepends.com

Feedback welcome.

share|improve this answer
    
Please add drag and drop support for opening assemblies. It would also be nice if XCOPY deployment was available, as well as source code. – gigaplex Dec 21 '15 at 0:02
    
I just noticed that the website doesn't have any obvious links to the section where there are two editions, and the free one is for non-commercial use. I accidentally stumbled on this by finding the "Upgrade to Professional" option in the Help menu. There should be a notice on the download page saying that it's not free for commercial use. – gigaplex Dec 21 '15 at 0:08
    
@gigaplex I'll take note of both of these thanks, I'll see what I can do. – Lloyd Dec 21 '15 at 11:41

Another handy Reflector add-in that I use is the Dependency Structure Matrix. It's really great to see what classes use what. Plus it's free.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't show version numbers, unfortunately, at least the version that installs as a visual studio add-in doesn't. – mhenry1384 Jun 9 '15 at 13:35

Best app that I see and use, show missed/problematic dlls: http://www.dependencywalker.com/

share|improve this answer
    
This tool will not help with .NET assemblies. – Kevin Panko Apr 18 at 18:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.