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I'm using 'fill = T' on a file that has single letters separated by commas:

    Pred
1   T,T
2   NA
3   D
4   NA
5   NA
6   T
7   P,B
8   NA
9   NA  

using the command:

sift <- read.table("/home/pred.txt", header=F, fill=TRUE, sep=',', stringsAsFactors=F)

Which I was hoping the sift will turn out as:

    V1 V2
1    T  T
2 <NA>    
3    D    
4 <NA>   
5 <NA>   
6    T   
7    P  B
8 <NA>   
9 <NA>

However, it comes out like:

    V1 
1    T 
2 <NA>    
3    D    
4 <NA>   
5 <NA>   
6    T   
7    P 
8 <NA>   
9 <NA> 

This code works when there are multiple sampleIDs (separated by a comma) in each row - but not for single letters. Does 'fill' work for single letters? Stupid question, I know.

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1  
Can you post the full file somewhere and provide a link? –  jlhoward Apr 1 '14 at 17:12
    
I don't think I have anywhere personal I can upload it - is there a recommended place? –  user2726449 Apr 1 '14 at 17:47
    
You could use Dropbox. –  jlhoward Apr 1 '14 at 18:13
    
    
This file has only one column, and apparently no comma's. The header is "SIFT_PRED" –  jlhoward Apr 1 '14 at 18:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So here is a workaround:

url  <- "https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/bjb241s16t63ev8/pred.txt?dl=1&token_hash=AAEBzfCGgoeHgNTvhMSVoZK6qRGrdwwuDZB3h8lWTZNtkA"
df.1 <- read.table(url,header=F,sep=",",fill=T,stringsAsFactors=F)
dim(df.1)
# [1] 149792      1     <-- 149,792 rows and ** 1 ** column

df.2 <- read.table(url,header=F,sep=",",fill=T,stringsAsFactors=F, 
                   col.names=c("V1","V2"))
dim(df.2)
# [1] 149633      2     <-- 149,633 rows and ** 2 ** columns

head(df.2[which(nchar(df.2$V2)>0),])
#      V1 V2
# 1000  T  T
# 2419  T  T
# 3507  T  T
# 3766  T  D
# 4308  T  D
# 4545  T  D

read.table(...) creates a data frame with number of columns determined by the first 5 rows. Since the first 5 rows in your file have only 1 column, that's what you get. Evidently, by specifying sep="," you force read.table(...) to add the "extra" data as extra rows.

The workaround explicitly sets the number of columns by specifying column names, which could be anything, as long as length(col.names) = 2.

share|improve this answer
    
There were a couple of rows that had 3 possibilities - so I added a third column. But thanks so much :), I never realised that was what was happening... that is, the number of columns in a data.frame is determined by the first 5 rows. Something to keep in mind in the future. –  user2726449 Apr 1 '14 at 19:23

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