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I keep geeting a segfault in the main function. I create a pointer to a struct I created and I pass it's reference to another function which allocates and reallocates memory. Then accessing it in the main function (where it was originally defined) causes a segfault.

Here is my test code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef struct {
  char desc[20];
  int nr;
} Kap;

void read(Kap *k);

int main(void) {
  Kap *k = NULL;
  read(k);

  printf("__%s %d\n", k[4].desc, k[4].nr);
  return 0;
}

void read(Kap *k) {
  int size = 3;
  k = (Kap*) calloc(size, sizeof(Kap));

  k[0].nr = 1;
  k[1].nr = 2;
  k[2].nr = 3;

  strcpy(k[0].desc, "hello0");
  strcpy(k[1].desc, "hello1");
  strcpy(k[2].desc, "hello2");

  size *= 2;
  k = (Kap*) realloc(k, sizeof(Kap)*size);
  if(k == NULL) {
    printf("ERROR\n");
    exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
  }


  k[3].nr = 4;
  k[4].nr = 5;
  k[5].nr = 6;

  strcpy(k[3].desc, "hello3");
  strcpy(k[4].desc, "hello4");
  strcpy(k[5].desc, "hello5");
}

What am I doing wrong?

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2  
Hint: try printing the value of k in the main() before and after read(). The values should change right? But they don't. –  this Apr 1 '14 at 19:11
    
Use format "%p" to print a pointer. Don't forget to cast to void* or char* before. –  Deduplicator Apr 1 '14 at 19:14
4  
Remember, every function in C does pass-by-value. That means that if you pass it a pointer, the function actually receives a duplicate of that pointer. In many cases this is OK because a pointer and its duplicate will point to the same space. In this case its not OK because you want the pointer k in main to point somewhere else after read is called. However, read can only operate on the duplicate of k. –  turbulencetoo Apr 1 '14 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a simplified version of the problem you are having:

#include <stdio.h>

void func(int x)
{
    x = 10;
}

int main()
{
    int x = 5;
    printf("x = %d\n", x);
    func(x);
    printf("x = %d\n", x);
}

The same reason x does not change is the reason that k does not change in your program. A simple way to fix it is this:

Kap *read()
{
    Kap *k = calloc(...);
    ...
    k = realloc(k, ...);
    ...
    return k;
}

int main()
{
    Kap *k = read();
    ...
}
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You guys are awesome! :) I didn't thought it this way. That's the reason why realloc returns the pointer instead of changing it. Thanks a lot! –  user2070245 Apr 1 '14 at 19:22
    
@Ctwx It's because of the way pointers work in C. For realloc to change the pointer, it would need a different interface. It would need to accept a pointer to the pointer. –  luser droog Apr 2 '14 at 3:08

The problem is you're not passing the pointer back to main(). Try something like this instead:

Kap * read();

int main(void) {
  Kap *k = read();

  printf("__%s %d\n", k[4].desc, k[4].nr);
  return 0;
}

Kap * read() {
    ... everything else you're already doing ...
    return k;
}

The code you showed passes a pointer by value into read(). The subroutine can use that pointer (though it's kind of useless since its local copy is immediately changed), however changes made within read() do not bubble back to its caller.

My suggestion is one method of allowing read() to send the new pointer back up, and it's probably the right method to choose. Another method is to change read()s signature to be void read(Kap **);, where it will receive a pointer to a pointer -- allowing it to modify the caller's pointer (due to being passed by reference).

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