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I have many different lambdas that all iterate through a list of parameters and pick some of them (with a switch) to do an operation on. I want to make sure that each lambda finds at least one of each case it is looking for and to report back if any case isn't hit. I can setup a vector of bools to track if each case was found, but I need to know the full count of cases in the switch to see if I got them all and to see the indices of the bools. I'd really like to integrate it in the general case macro, that way nothing will break if a case gets added later without updating a count.

Lambda example:

#define OneCase ???

auto MysteryLambda = [](Parameters params) -> int
{
 //something to set the case count to 0, whatever it is

 for (auto param : params)
 {
  switch (param)
  {
   case First:
    OneCase; //case count + 1
    //do operation
    break;
   case Second:
    OneCase; //case count + 1
    //do operation
    break;
   case Third:
    OneCase; //case count + 1
    //do operation
    break;
  }
 }


 static const int cases = ???; //this would be 3

 std::cout << "The enum has " << cases << " cases." << std::endl;

 return cases;
};

Then the lambda can return that const count. Is this possible?

If it isn't possible, is there an alternative way to do this?

share|improve this question
1  
It is not clear what you are asking, maybe if you explain the context in which you want to use this and how it might help. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 1 at 20:51
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas I want an automatic way to count the cases in a switch just by placing some command in each case. –  user173342 Apr 1 at 20:53
    
Do you want this because you want to statically enforce that every lambda has a case for every value of the enum? –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 at 21:00
    
Count all of the cases, not those that are evaluated? Think what that means... you are asking without computing the value to come up with a result is it not? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 1 at 21:01
    
@j_random_hacker No, that's the problem, each lambda only looks at a subset of the possible cases, but I still want to know if it didn't fill out everything it is looking at. –  user173342 Apr 1 at 21:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Idea: Turn a switch into a bunch of if statements that record their presence in an array.

Preamble:

#define BIG_ENOUGH 50     // Just needs to be bigger than the maximum enum value

#define BEGIN_DETECTED_SWITCH(x) \
{ \
    vector<bool> __has(BIG_ENOUGH, false); \
    vector<bool> __saw(BIG_ENOUGH, false); \
    auto __x(x); \
    { ;    // Dummy open brace to be consumed by first DETECTED_CASE()

#define END_DETECTED_SWITCH \
    } \
    for (int i = 0; i < BIG_ENOUGH; ++i) { \
        if (__has[i] && !__saw[i]) { \
            cout << "Didn't see any " << i << "'s!\n"; \
        } \
    } \
}

#define DETECTED_CASE(x) \
    } \
    __has[x] = true; \
    if (__x == (x)) { \
        __saw[x] = true;

Now turn each switch statement into:

BEGIN_DETECTED_SWITCH(someEnumVal)
    DETECTED_CASE(First)
        // Code for first
    DETECTED_CASE(Second)
        // Code for second
    DETECTED_CASE(Third)
        // Code for Third
END_DETECTED_SWITCH

You could slightly generalise it by having END_DETECTED_SWITCH take a lambda parameter that gets called with every non-firing case, instead of hardcoding the "reaction".

share|improve this answer
    
Since the amount of cases would be small, there wouldn't be much of an issue with having lots of if statements. This could be done without macros at all, right? Certainly less insane than what I've been pursuing –  user173342 Apr 1 at 21:55
1  
I don't think you can get rid of macros entirely, unless you want to rely on programmer discipline to ensure that __has[x] and __saw[x] always get set at the right times. And it's still fairly insane :-P –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 at 21:57
1  
However, it has one big advantage over counting (besides counting being compiler dependent): it's possible to have the vector store a std::pair<bool, std::string> and have the macro place the enum text as a string in __has. I don't really see a way to slip such functionality into the __COUNTER__ method. edit: Nevermind, it'd be possible but not pretty –  user173342 Apr 1 at 21:59
    
Good idea. Also the __COUNTER__ approach is vulnerable if other code calls __COUNTER__ somewhere inside the switch. That's probably unlikely, but debugging versions of various things might do this behind the scenes. –  j_random_hacker Apr 1 at 22:03

It would be just this side of possible to use the GCC/MSVC __COUNTER__ macro for this, though it would entail a significant amount of scaffolding around the switch statement itself. In general, no, it's not possible. It sounds like you want a map of lambdas, not a switch statement.

share|improve this answer
    
It really doesn't take much scaffolding, and it's only done once. This actually works and is basically what I was looking for, although I'm sad that something hacky like __COUNTER__ is the only way to do it. Oh well, check out my answer to see the terrible results of your suggestion. –  user173342 Apr 1 at 21:41

Ok, Sneftel's __COUNTER__ suggestion is viable! Here's how I managed to make it work:

enum class Parameter //sample parameters, they don't have to be the same for each lambda
{
 First, Second, Third, Fourth
};

typedef std::vector<Parameter> Parameters;

void test()
{
 static const int startcases = __COUNTER__ + 1; //the initial state of counter when this lambda is pre-proced

 auto GetIndex = [](unsigned int counter) -> unsigned int //helper function, it takes __COUNTER__ from wherever it is called
 {
  return counter - startcases;
 };

 //Example lambda.  This isn't built to do anything useful at all.

 auto Example = [&GetIndex](Parameters parameters, std::vector<bool>& used) -> unsigned int
 {
  for (auto parameter : parameters)
  {
   switch (parameter) //only looking at First and Third
   {
   case Parameter::First:
    used[GetIndex(__COUNTER__)] = true;
    break;
   case Parameter::Third:
    used[GetIndex(__COUNTER__)] = true;
    break;
   }
  }

  static const unsigned int cases = __COUNTER__ - startcases; //this would be 2

  std::cout << "The enum has " << cases << " cases." << std::endl;

  return cases;
 };

 //Ok, time for a test!

 //Load out sample params, using VC++2012 so no init list on vectors. :(

 Parameters parameters; 
 parameters.push_back(Parameter::First);
 parameters.push_back(Parameter::Second);
 parameters.push_back(Parameter::First); //no Third in this vector
 parameters.push_back(Parameter::Fourth);

 std::vector<bool> used; //a vector of bools filled to some arbitrary capacity with falses, I can have size checks in a more extensive helper function so no big deal
 used.insert(used.begin(), 10, false);

 unsigned int cases = Example(parameters, used); //returns # of cases in this particular lambda

 for (unsigned int i = 0; i < cases; ++i) //loop through for each case and see if one is false (meaning it had no hit)
 {
  if (!used[i])
  {
   std::cerr << "Didn't process case " << i << "." << std::endl; 
  }
 }
}

Output:

The enum has 2 cases.
Didn't process case 1.
share|improve this answer

If the number of lines of code per case is fixed (admittedly a hard constraint), the answer is yes !

Insert Begin= __LINE__; before the switch and End= __LINE__; after it. Anytime later, (End - Begin - Extra) / LinesPerCase gives you the answer :)

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