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So this answer made me think about the scenario where you assign the result of new to a pointer to a const. AFAIK, there's no reason you can't legally const_cast the constness away and actually modify the object in this situation:

struct X{int x;};

//....
const X* x = new X;
const_cast<X*>(x)->x = 0; // okay

But then I thought - what if you actually want new to create a const object. So I tried

struct X{};

//....
const X* x = new const X;

and it compiled!!!

Is this a GCC extension or is it standard behavior? I have never seen this in practice. If it's standard, I'll start using it whenever possible.

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new obviously doesn't create a const object. Why do you say that? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 at 23:08
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit edited. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 1 at 23:08
2  
new doesn't create a const object Why do you say that? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 at 23:09
    
Before Luchian had his revelation, in the case where T is a non-const-qualified type and you write const T *ptr = new T;, then new obviously doesn't create a const object :-) It's legal to cast const away from ptr and use the result to modify the object in that case. –  Steve Jessop Apr 1 at 23:16
    
@SteveJessop: Sure, but that has nothing to do with new. It's like int obj = 2; const int* ptr = &obj; *const_cast<int*>(ptr) = 3; I don't see anything surprising here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 at 23:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

const is part of the type. It doesn't matter whether you allocate your object with dynamic, static or automatic storage duration. It's still const. Casting away that constness and mutating the object would still be an undefined operation.

constness is an abstraction that the type system gives us to implement safety around non-mutable objects; it does so in large part to aid us in interaction with read-only memory, but that does not mean that its semantics are restricted to such memory. Indeed, C++ doesn't even know what is and isn't read-only memory.

As well as this being derivable from all the usual rules, with no exception [lol] made for dynamically-allocated objects, the standards mention this explicitly (albeit in a note):

[C++03: 5.3.4/1]: The new-expression attempts to create an object of the type-id (8.1) or new-type-id to which it is applied. The type of that object is the allocated type. This type shall be a complete object type, but not an abstract class type or array thereof (1.8, 3.9, 10.4). [Note: because references are not objects, references cannot be created by new-expressions. ] [Note: the type-id may be a cv-qualified type, in which case the object created by the new-expression has a cv-qualified type. ] [..]

[C++11: 5.3.4/1]: The new-expression attempts to create an object of the type-id (8.1) or new-type-id to which it is applied. The type of that object is the allocated type. This type shall be a complete object type, but not an abstract class type or array thereof (1.8, 3.9, 10.4). It is implementation-defined whether over-aligned types are supported (3.11). [ Note: because references are not objects, references cannot be created by new-expressions. —end note ] [ Note: the type-id may be a cv-qualified type, in which case the object created by the new-expression has a cv-qualified type. —end note ] [..]

There's also a usage example given in [C++11: 7.1.6.1/4].

Not sure what else you expected. I can't say I've ever done this myself, but I don't see any particular reason not to. There's probably some tech sociologist who can tell you statistics on how rarely we dynamically allocate something only to treat it as non-mutable.

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I've just never seen a new const ... anywhere (but I guess I knew tbh, just thought it was interesting) –  Luchian Grigore Apr 1 at 23:11
    
@LuchianGrigore: I can't say I've ever used it myself, but I don't see why it should be treated as any less valid than a const object created "on the stack", as it were. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 1 at 23:11
1  
There is also example on 7.1.6.1/4 –  zch Apr 1 at 23:11
1  
Is this valid? int x = 0; const int *px = new (&x) const int(0); x = 1; cout << *px; ? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 1 at 23:18
2  
@JohannesSchaub-litb: I think that x = 1; is undefined behavior, because you're using an object that no longer exists (its storage has been reused). And naturally you have to destroy *px and use placement new to put an object of the original type, int, back before it goes out of scope. –  Ben Voigt Apr 1 at 23:33

new obviously doesn't create a const object (I hope).

If you ask new to create a const object, you get a const object.

there's no reason you can't legally const_cast the constness away and actually modify the object.

There is. The reason is that the language specification calls that out explicitly as undefined behaviour. So, in a way, you can, but that means pretty much nothing.

I don't know what you expected from this, but if you thought the issue was one of allocating in readonly memory or not, that's far from the point. That doesn't matter. A compiler can assume such an object can't change and optimise accordingly and you end up with unexpected results.

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+1 for pointing out that because you can do something doesn't mean that you should do it. –  LihO Apr 1 at 23:15
    
so const X* x = new X is a pointer to a const object? Even though new X doesn't create a new object ? –  Luchian Grigore Apr 1 at 23:16
    
Just to be clear, you are allowed to delete that const pointer right? Otherwise, how do you get rid of it? –  Mysticial Apr 1 at 23:16
1  
@Mysticial: I'd say that delete cleans up the memory regardless what occupies it. AFAIK the type is used just to determine the way the object should be cleaned (destructor) and to determine the size of the memory block that is about to be freed. –  LihO Apr 1 at 23:20
2  
@LuchianGrigore, if you create a non-const object and then assign it to a const object pointer, I believe you're able to const_cast it back to a non-const pointer and modify it. But I'm agreeing with this answer, you've created a const object and so it must remain. –  Mark Ransom Apr 1 at 23:20

My way of looking at this is:

  • X and const X and pointers to them are distinct types
  • there is an implicit conversion from X* to const X*, but not the other way around
  • therefore the following are legal and the x in each case has identical type and behaviour

    const X* x = new X; const X* x = new const X;

The only remaining question is whether a different allocator might be called in the second case (perhaps in read only memory). The answer is no, there is no such provision in the standard.

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