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I need help figuring how to work around removing a 'column' from a nested list to modify it.

Say I have

L = [[1,2,3,4],
     [5,6,7,8],
     [9,1,2,3]]

and I want to remove the second column (so values 2,6,1) to get:

L = [[1,3,4],
     [5,7,8],
     [9,2,3]]

I'm stuck with how to modify the list with just taking out a column. I've done something sort of like this before? Except we were printing it instead, and of course it wouldn't work in this case because I believe the break conflicts with the rest of the values I want in the list.

def L_break(L):

i = 0
while i < len(L):
    k = 0
    while k < len(L[i]):
        print( L[i][k] , end = " ")
        if k == 1:
            break
        k = k + 1
    print()
    i = i + 1

So, how would you go about modifying this nested list? Is my mind in the right place comparing it to the code I have posted or does this require something different?

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5 Answers 5

You can simply delete the appropriate element from each row using del:

L = [[1,2,3,4],
     [5,6,7,8],
     [9,1,2,3]]

for row in L:
    del row[1]  # 0 for column 1, 1 for column 2, etc.

print L
# outputs [[1, 3, 4], [5, 7, 8], [9, 2, 3]]
share|improve this answer
    
Ok so obviously I've still much to get out of python; what exactly is 'row' ? Like, is it something that's built in python? I've never used it before –  Crisis Apr 2 '14 at 2:07
1  
@Crisis All we're doing here is looping over the list L. We assign the variable (arbitrarily named) row to each element of L (i.e. each nested list). Then, we delete an element of row using del. You might want to read about Python basics such as for-loops. –  arshajii Apr 2 '14 at 2:10
    
@arashajii Oh ok ok, right I think I understand. My instructor does not want us to use For-loops yet so I wasn't sure. Thank-you. –  Crisis Apr 2 '14 at 2:21
1  
Are >>> necessary? They make answer harder to read. –  Pavlo Apr 2 '14 at 8:21

If you want to extract that column for later use, while removing it from the original list, use a list comprehension with pop:

>>> L = [[1,2,3,4],
...       [5,6,7,8],
...       [9,1,2,3]]
>>> 
>>> [r.pop(1) for r in L]
[2, 6, 1]
>>> L
[[1, 3, 4], [5, 7, 8], [9, 2, 3]]

Otherwise, just loop over the list and delete the fields you no longer want, as in arshajii's answer

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Here is one way, updated to take in kojiro's advice.

>>> L[:] = [i[:1]+i[2:] for i in L]
>>> L
[[1, 3, 4], [5, 7, 8], [9, 2, 3]]

You can generalize this to remove any column:

def remove_column(matrix, column):
    return [row[:column] + row[column+1:] for row in matrix]

# Remove 2nd column
copyofL = remove_column(L, 1) # Column is zero-base, so, 1=second column
share|improve this answer
    
You may wish to have L[:] on the LHS of that expression to replace the list in-place. –  kojiro Apr 2 '14 at 1:53
    
@kojiro: Excellent advice. –  Hai Vu Apr 2 '14 at 1:56

You can use operator.itemgetter, which is created for this very purpose.

from operator import itemgetter
getter = itemgetter(0, 2, 3)            # Only indexes which are needed
print(list(map(list, map(getter, L))))
# [[1, 3, 4], [5, 7, 8], [9, 2, 3]]

You can use it in List comprehension like this

print([list(getter(item)) for item in L])
# [[1, 3, 4], [5, 7, 8], [9, 2, 3]]

You can also use nested List Comprehension, in which we skip the elements if the index is 1, like this

print([[item for index, item in enumerate(items) if index != 1] for items in L])
# [[1, 3, 4], [5, 7, 8], [9, 2, 3]]

Note: All these suggested in this answer will not affect the original list. They will generate new lists without the unwanted elements.

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Use map-lambda:

print map(lambda x: x[:1]+x[2:], L)
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