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I am trying to optimize the performance of a class in our legacy code that is using reflection to create various views. I'd rather we didn't use reflection at all, but removing it is not an option in the short term. The code comes from the MVC# framework. Here it is:

public class CreateHelper
{
    #region Documentation
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates an object of specified type.
    /// </summary>
    #endregion
    public static object Create(Type t)
    {
        return t.GetConstructor(new Type[] { }).Invoke(new object[] { });
    }

    #region Documentation
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates an object of specified type with parameters passed to the constructor.
    /// </summary>
    #endregion
    public static object Create(Type t, params object[] parameters)
    {
        Type[] paramTypes = new Type[parameters.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < parameters.Length; i++)
            paramTypes[i] = parameters[i].GetType();
        return t.GetConstructor(paramTypes).Invoke(parameters);
    }
}

I am looking to make the implementation of these two methods as fast as possible. I read this great article by Ayende on object creation optimization and have tried to modify his example for my purposes, however my knowledge of IL is non existent.

I get a VerificationException Operation could destabilize the runtime. in the Create method. Does anyone know what is the problem? Is there a faster implementation of this method I can use? Here is my attempt:

public class Created
{
    public int Num;
    public string Name;

    public Created()
    {
    }

    public Created(int num, string name)
    {
        this.Num = num;
        this.Name = name;
    }
}

public class CreateHelper
{
    private delegate object CreateCtor();
    private static CreateCtor createdCtorDelegate;

    #region Documentation
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates an object of specified type.
    /// </summary>
    #endregion
    public static object Create(Type t)
    {
        var ctor = t.GetConstructor(new Type[] { });

        var method = new DynamicMethod("CreateIntance", t, new Type[] { typeof(object[]) });
        var gen = method.GetILGenerator();
        gen.Emit(OpCodes.Ldarg_0);//arr
        gen.Emit(OpCodes.Call, ctor);// new Created
        gen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
        createdCtorDelegate = (CreateCtor)method.CreateDelegate(typeof(CreateCtor));
        return createdCtorDelegate(); // <=== VerificationException Operation could destabilize the runtime.
    }

    #region Documentation
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates an object of specified type with parameters passed to the constructor.
    /// </summary>
    #endregion
    public static object Create(Type t, params object[] parameters)
    {
        Type[] paramTypes = new Type[parameters.Length];
        for (int i = 0; i < parameters.Length; i++)
            paramTypes[i] = parameters[i].GetType();
        return t.GetConstructor(paramTypes).Invoke(parameters);
    }
}

I then use the class like this:

class Program
{
    private static Created CreateInstance()
    {
        return (Created)CreateHelper.Create(typeof(Created));
        //return new Created();
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int iterations = 1000000;
        Stopwatch watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < iterations; i++)
        {
            CreateInstance();
        }
        Console.WriteLine(watch.Elapsed);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Update 1

I did some timings:

  • new Created() : 00:00:00.0225015
  • Activator.CreateInstance<Created>() : 00:00:00.1232143
  • (Created)CreateHelper.Create(typeof(Created)) : 00:00:00.3946555

  • new Created(i, i.ToString()) : 00:00:00.1476882

  • (Created)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(Created), new object[]{ i, i.ToString() }) : 00:00:01.6342624
  • (Created)CreateHelper.Create(typeof(Created), new object[] {i, i.ToString()}) : 00:00:01.1591511

Update 2

For the default constructor case, the solution suggested by @Brannon worked, however the time obtained was 00:00:00.1165000, which was not a huge improvement. Here it is:

public class CreateHelper
{
    private delegate object DefaultConstructor();

    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<Type, DefaultConstructor> DefaultConstructors = new ConcurrentDictionary<Type, DefaultConstructor>();

    #region Documentation
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates an object of specified type.
    /// </summary>
    #endregion
    public static object Create(Type t)
    {
        DefaultConstructor defaultConstructorDelegate;

        if (!DefaultConstructors.TryGetValue(t, out defaultConstructorDelegate))
        {
            var ctor = t.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes);

            var method = new DynamicMethod("CreateIntance", t, Type.EmptyTypes);
            var gen = method.GetILGenerator();
            gen.Emit(OpCodes.Nop);
            gen.Emit(OpCodes.Newobj, ctor);
            gen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
            defaultConstructorDelegate = (DefaultConstructor)method.CreateDelegate(typeof(DefaultConstructor));
            DefaultConstructors[t] = defaultConstructorDelegate;
        }

        return defaultConstructorDelegate.Invoke();
    }
}

Update 3

Using a compiled expression of Expression.New also yielded a very good result (00:00:00.1166022). Here is the code:

public class CreateHelper
{        
    private static readonly ConcurrentDictionary<Type, Func<object>> DefaultConstructors = new ConcurrentDictionary<Type, Func<object>>();

    #region Documentation
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates an object of specified type.
    /// </summary>
    #endregion
    public static object Create(Type t)
    {
        Func<object> defaultConstructor;

        if (!DefaultConstructors.TryGetValue(t, out defaultConstructor))
        {
            var ctor = t.GetConstructor(Type.EmptyTypes);

            if (ctor == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("Unsupported constructor for type " + t);
            }

            var constructorExpression = Expression.New(ctor);
            var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<Created>>(constructorExpression);
            defaultConstructor = lambda.Compile();
            DefaultConstructors[t] = defaultConstructor;
        }

        return defaultConstructor.Invoke();
    }

    #region Documentation
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates an object of specified type with parameters passed to the constructor.
    /// </summary>
    #endregion
    public static object Create(Type t, params object[] parameters)
    {
        return null;
    }
}

Summary

For the default constructor case, here is the summary:

  • (Created)CreateHelper.Create(typeof(Created)) : 00:00:00.3946555
  • new Created() : 00:00:00.0225015
  • Activator.CreateInstance<Created>() : 00:00:00.1232143
  • DynamicMethod : 00:00:00.1165000
  • Expression.New : 00:00:00.1131143
share|improve this question
    
Activator.CreateInstance – hazzik Apr 2 '14 at 3:50
    
Good suggestion, it is still six times slower than using the constructor but 4 times faster than the original implementaiton – Ned Stoyanov Apr 2 '14 at 4:02
    
You should also try Expression.New : geekswithblogs.net/mrsteve/archive/2012/02/19/… – YK1 Apr 2 '14 at 9:20

First, you should probably disable the garbage collector for that particular test. It might hamper your results. Or you could put all the created instances into an array. I'm not sure that calling ToString() as part of it is helpful either.

Your plan for fancy constructor code is not necessarily the right plan. The constructor lookup itself is quite slow. You should cache the delegates in a dictionary with a Type key. Most of the IoC containers do this (caching and constructing) for you automatically. I think that using one of those would prove valuable in your situation. In fact, the newer JSON frameworks also cache the constructor information for quick object creation. Maybe something like Json.Net or ServiceStack.Text would be helpful.

How many different types are you constructing? (I know your example only shows one.)

I'm not sure your parameters on DynamicMethod are right. This code (below) has been stable for me. Don't call it on value types or arrays.

DynamicMethod dm = new DynamicMethod("MyCtor", type, Type.EmptyTypes, typeof(ClassFactory).Module, true);
ILGenerator ilgen = dm.GetILGenerator();
ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Nop);
ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Newobj, ci);
ilgen.Emit(OpCodes.Ret);
CtorDelegate del = ((CtorDelegate) dm.CreateDelegate(typeof(CtorDelegate)));
return del.Invoke(); // could cache del in a dictionary
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks for you answer, I'll try out your code and storing the constructor delegates in the dictionary. We're probably creating around 50 different types. – Ned Stoyanov Apr 2 '14 at 5:14
    
The code you posted worked nicely, thanks! Do you by any chance know how to generate the IL for non-default constructors? – Ned Stoyanov Apr 2 '14 at 5:53
    
I do not know the IL for the other constructors. For them, you might try caching compiled expressions. See here: rogeralsing.com/2008/02/28/linq-expressions-creating-objects – Brannon Apr 2 '14 at 13:22

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