Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way of synchronizing changes made in a html file only in some areas? leaving the other elements intact.

Lets say I have these 2 files:

hello-world-english.html:

<div>
<p>Hello World</p>
</div>

hello-world-spanish.html:

<div>
<p>Hola Mundo</p>
</div>

And I make the following change to the first one (hello-world-english.html):

<div id=new-div">

<div>

<h2 id="new-header-2">
</h2>

<p>Hello World</p>
</div>

<div>

Then I want the second one to synchronize the changes but leaving what's inside the <p> tag intact:

<div id=new-div">

<div>

<h2 id="new-header-2">
</h2>

<p>Hola Mundo</p>
</div>

<div>

P S :

I'm using Vim!

share|improve this question
1  
Why are you referring to Vim? You want to do this interactively? (Then just use vimdiff, and ignore the sections you don't want synchronized.) The question makes it sound like you prefer a scripted solution. But then why the suggested restriction to the command language of vim or any other editor? –  dubiousjim Feb 17 '10 at 12:46

3 Answers 3

You could use <iframe> to separate what you want to keep syncronized in different files, for example:

hello-world.html:
<div id="new-div">
<div>
<h2 id="new-header-2">
</h2>
</div>
</div>

'

hello-world-english.html:
<iframe src="hello-world.html"></iframe>
<p>Hello World</p>

'

hello-world-spanish.html:
<iframe src="hello-world.html"></iframe>
<p>Hola Mundo</p>

But that'd be a problem if you want the unmodified data to be, for example, inside one of those <div>. Alternatively, you could write a generator that'd take two files: hello-world.html and a list of the parts you want to keep separated. The trick here is to use a special marker, such as @ (or any other rarely used character), and replace it with one of the items in the list, which would be fairly trivial. Just regenerate when either hello-world.html or the list get updated, and you're all set.

Or rather not. I think the problem is already solved by someone with better experience than me. Google is you friend ;).

share|improve this answer

Short answer: No.

Longer answer: it really depends on what changes you are making to the file. Two possibilities come to mind:

1) make the changes to one file and run it through your version control diff (you are using version control, aren't you?) to get a patch file. Then apply the patch file to the other HTML file.

2) write a vim script with a series of edit commands that make the changes you want, and then open each file in vim and :source the script.

Both if these may fail or make unexpected changes if they hit differences between the HTML files that they are not expecting.

Better answer: Maintaining two version of the html file with different languages is a really bad idea and will not scale (what if you want to add a third language? A fourth? A tenth?). I suggest having a template file with placeholders for all the user-visible text, and a script (in Python, Ruby or whatever you are comfortable with) that replaces the placeholders with text from a language-specific conversion table. Then adding a new language is simply a matter of writing a new conversion table, and you can make whatever changes you want to the template and regenerate the HTML for every language.

share|improve this answer
:h diff

Have vim display the differences between the two files, and use dp and do to update the part you wish to.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.