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I'm learning python for the first time. I have an aim which is to take data from an API and output it as xml.

The output is stored in an array ("projectData"), here is an example of the output:

[{'code': 'demo',
 'created_at': datetime.datetime(2008, 6, 11, 7, 35, 19, tzinfo=<api.LocalTimezone object at 0x10072ab10>),
 'created_by': None,
 'id': 4,
 'image': 'https://website.com/files/0000/0000/blah.jpg',
 'name': 'Demo Project',
 'description': 'This is for demonstration purposes',
 'due': '2009-05-30',
 'start': '2009-05-06',
 'status': 'Active',
 'stype': 'Demo',
 'tag_list': [],
 'type': 'Project',
 'updated_at': datetime.datetime(2009, 5, 27, 1, 41, 55, tzinfo=<api.LocalTimezone object at 0x10072ab10>),
 'updated_by': {'id': 24, 'name': 'Test', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
 'users': [{'id': 19, 'name': 'User 1', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 18, 'name': 'User 2', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 17, 'name': 'User 3', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 16, 'name': 'User 4', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 15, 'name': 'User 5', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 14, 'name': 'User 6', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 13, 'name': 'User 7', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 12, 'name': 'User 8', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 20, 'name': 'Client 1', 'type': 'HumanUser'}]},

(etc.)

I've written some code which will output it as xml like so:

for _project in projectData:
  print "<Project>"
  for key in _project:
    value = _project[key]
    print "\t<" + str(key) + ">" + str(value) + "</" + str(key) + ">"
  print("</Project>\n")

Which actually gives me a result that works for me.

However, because I'm new to this, I suspect that this isn't a very efficient approach, and may be susceptible to all sorts of bugs, I was hoping that someone more knowledgeable might have some pointers for me. The next thing I want to try with this is make it recursive, so that the "updated_by" element for example returns its own xml

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I'm curious, this question does not seem to me to be either "unclear" or "not useful". If you mark a question down, should you not comment as to why? –  MattH Feb 17 '10 at 18:21
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's an example using lxml.etree, incomplete.. and probably a bit naive. Really you should define a schema and make sure your output is consistent with it.

Edit, said it was incomplete, added None type and assumed a created_by is like an updated_by when populated

import datetime

projects = [{'code': 'demo',
 'created_at': datetime.datetime(2008, 6, 11, 7, 35, 19),
 'created_by': None,
 'id': 4,
 'image': 'https://website.com/files/0000/0000/blah.jpg',
 'name': 'Demo Project',
 'description': 'This is for demonstration purposes',
 'due': '2009-05-30',
 'start': '2009-05-06',
 'status': 'Active',
 'stype': 'Demo',
 'tag_list': [],
 'type': 'Project',
 'updated_at': datetime.datetime(2009, 5, 27, 1, 41, 55),
 'updated_by': {'id': 24, 'name': 'Test', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
 'users': [{'id': 19, 'name': 'User 1', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 18, 'name': 'User 2', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 17, 'name': 'User 3', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 16, 'name': 'User 4', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 15, 'name': 'User 5', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 14, 'name': 'User 6', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 13, 'name': 'User 7', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 12, 'name': 'User 8', 'type': 'HumanUser'},
           {'id': 20, 'name': 'Client 1', 'type': 'HumanUser'}]},
 ]

from lxml import etree

def E(tag, parent=None, content=None, children=None, **kw):
  e = etree.Element(tag)
  if not content is None:
    e.text = str(content)
  for k,v in kw.items():
    e.set(k, str(v))
  if not parent is None:
    parent.append(e)
  if not children is None:
    for c in children:
      e.append(c)
  return e

def processProject(data):
  attrs = ('name','type','id')
  p = E('Project')
  for item in attrs:
    p.set(item,str(data[item]))
  for k,v in [ x for x in data.items() if x[0] not in attrs ]:
    if v is None:
      E(k,parent=p)
    elif isinstance(v,basestring):
      E(k,content=v,parent=p)
    elif isinstance(v,(float,long,int)):
      E(k,content=str(v),parent=p)
    elif isinstance(v,datetime.datetime):
      E(k,content=v.strftime('%Y-%m-%d %H%M'),parent=p)
    elif k == 'users':
      users = E(k,parent=p)
      for u in v:
        E('user',parent=users,**dict([ (x,str(y)) for (x,y) in u.items()]))
    elif k in ('updated_by','created_by'):
      E(k,parent=p,**dict([ (x,str(y)) for (x,y) in v.items()]))
    elif k == 'tag_list':
      taglist = E(k,parent=p)
      for t in v:
        E('tag',parent=taglist,content=t)
  return p

>>> projxml = processProject(projects[0])
>>> etree.dump(projxml)
<Project name="Demo Project" type="Project" id="4">
  <status>Active</status>
  <code>demo</code>
  <created_at>2008-06-11 0735</created_at>
  <due>2009-05-30</due>
  <created_by/>
  <updated_at>2009-05-27 0141</updated_at>
  <start>2009-05-06</start>
  <image>https://website.com/files/0000/0000/blah.jpg</image>
  <updated_by type="HumanUser" id="24" name="Test"/>
  <users>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="19" name="User 1"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="18" name="User 2"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="17" name="User 3"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="16" name="User 4"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="15" name="User 5"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="14" name="User 6"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="13" name="User 7"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="12" name="User 8"/>
    <user type="HumanUser" id="20" name="Client 1"/>
  </users>
  <tag_list/>
  <stype>Demo</stype>
  <description>This is for demonstration purposes</description>
</Project>
share|improve this answer
    
thanks matt I will examine this and see if I can follow it all through! –  Jack Feb 17 '10 at 13:14
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Consider using something like genshi or etree instead of building the XML by hand.

share|improve this answer
1  
eTree is already distributed with Python, so I'd say it's the best starting point and seems good for the job until different needs arise. –  piro Feb 17 '10 at 11:48
    
thanks i will check out eTree –  Jack Feb 17 '10 at 13:13
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Consider using some kind of template tool (even string.Template) instead of lots of string manipulation.

For example, a generic dictionary-to-tag is pretty simple with the silly little built-in Template class.

import string
tag= string.Template( "<$tag>$value</$tag>" )
for k,v in someProjectDictionary:
    print tag.substitute( key=k, value=v )

However, graduating to Jinja or Mako makes this much, much simpler, since your entire XML document becomes simple iteration within the template language.

{% for p in project_data %}
<project>
    {% for k in p %}
    <{{k}}>{{p[k]}}</{{k}}>
    {% endfor %}
</project>
{% endfor %}        

You can create a separate file for this and use Jinja to handle the substitution into your XML template from your data.

from jinja2 import Environment, PackageLoader
env = Environment(loader=PackageLoader('yourapplication', 'templates'))
template = env.get_template('mytemplate.html')
print template.render(project_data=the_project_data_list)
share|improve this answer
    
Do Jinja and/or Mako guarantee that the output will be well-formed XML? Or does he have to know to escape special characters in his values? –  Robert Rossney Feb 17 '10 at 11:57
    
@Robert Rossney: They're just template engines; they guarantee very little. Jinja offers several kinds of escape mechanisms. Generally, automatic escaping is what you use. jinja.pocoo.org/2/documentation/templates#html-escaping –  S.Lott Feb 17 '10 at 13:42
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