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I've just had to write a string reverse function in C# 2.0 (i.e. LINQ not available) and came up with this:

public string Reverse(string text)
{
    char[] cArray = text.ToCharArray();
    string reverse = String.Empty;
    for (int i = cArray.Length - 1; i > -1; i--)
    {
        reverse += cArray[i];
    }
    return reverse;
}

Personally I'm not crazy about the function and am convinced that there's a better way to do it. Is there?

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30  
Surprisingly tricky if you want proper international support. Example: Croatian/Serbian have two-character letters lj, nj etc. Proper reverse of "ljudi" is "idulj", NOT "idujl". I'm sure you'd fare far worse when it comes to Arabic, Thai etc. –  dbkk Nov 14 '09 at 10:46
1  
Much newer related thread: Reverse a string with accent chars? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jul 23 '13 at 15:15

32 Answers 32

up vote 167 down vote accepted
public static string Reverse( string s )
{
    char[] charArray = s.ToCharArray();
    Array.Reverse( charArray );
    return new string( charArray );
}

I think the above works not tested, although the stringbuilder class may also have a reverse function I haven't checked that though.

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12  
sambo99: It doesn't need to mention unicode: chars in C# are unicode characters, not bytes. Xor may be faster, but apart from being far less readable, that may even be what Array.Reverse() uses internally. –  Nick Johnson Oct 23 '08 at 13:18
14  
@Arachnid: Actually, chars in C# are UTF-16 code units; it takes two of them to represent a supplementary character. See jaggersoft.com/csharp_standard/9.4.1.htm. –  Bradley Grainger Oct 23 '08 at 15:18
12  
Unicode control characters makes this method useless for non latin character sets. See Jon Skeet explanation, using a sock puppet: msmvps.com/blogs/jon_skeet/archive/2009/11/02/… (1/4 the way down), or the video: vimeo.com/7516539 –  Callum Rogers Apr 19 '10 at 23:14
7  
Hope you don't encounter any surrogates or combining characters. –  dalle Oct 14 '10 at 19:04
3  
The .NET framework has a correct implementation through Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings.StrReverse. wikiencyclopedia.net/DotNET/8.0/untmp/whidbey/REDBITS/vb/… has the implementation in StrReverse and InternalStrReverse. –  Pieter van Ginkel Aug 3 '12 at 6:07

This is turning out to be a surprisingly tricky question.

I would recommend using Array.Reverse for most cases as it is coded natively and it is very simple to maintain and understand.

It seems to outperform StringBuilder in all the cases I tested.

public string Reverse(string text)
{
   if (text == null) return null;

   // this was posted by petebob as well 
   char[] array = text.ToCharArray();
   Array.Reverse(array);
   return new String(array);
}

There is a second approach that can be faster for certain string lengths which uses Xor.

    public static string ReverseXor(string s)
    {
        if (s == null) return null;
        char[] charArray = s.ToCharArray();
        int len = s.Length - 1;

        for (int i = 0; i < len; i++, len--)
        {
            charArray[i] ^= charArray[len];
            charArray[len] ^= charArray[i];
            charArray[i] ^= charArray[len];
        }

        return new string(charArray);
    }

Note If you want to support the full Unicode UTF16 charset read this. And use the implementation there instead. It can be further optimized by using one of the above algorithms and running through the string to clean it up after the chars are reversed.

Here is a performance comparison between the StringBuilder, Array.Reverse and Xor method.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication4
{
    class Program
    {
        delegate string StringDelegate(string s);

        static void Benchmark(string description, StringDelegate d, int times, string text)
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
            sw.Start();
            for (int j = 0; j < times; j++)
            {
                d(text);
            }
            sw.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("{0} Ticks {1} : called {2} times.", sw.ElapsedTicks, description, times);
        }

        public static string ReverseXor(string s)
        {
            char[] charArray = s.ToCharArray();
            int len = s.Length - 1;

            for (int i = 0; i < len; i++, len--)
            {
                charArray[i] ^= charArray[len];
                charArray[len] ^= charArray[i];
                charArray[i] ^= charArray[len];
            }

            return new string(charArray);
        }

        public static string ReverseSB(string text)
        {
            StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(text.Length);
            for (int i = text.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                builder.Append(text[i]);
            }
            return builder.ToString();
        }

        public static string ReverseArray(string text)
        {
            char[] array = text.ToCharArray();
            Array.Reverse(array);
            return (new string(array));
        }

        public static string StringOfLength(int length)
        {
            Random random = new Random();
            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
            {
                sb.Append(Convert.ToChar(Convert.ToInt32(Math.Floor(26 * random.NextDouble() + 65))));
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            int[] lengths = new int[] {1,10,15,25,50,75,100,1000,100000};

            foreach (int l in lengths)
            {
                int iterations = 10000;
                string text = StringOfLength(l);
                Benchmark(String.Format("String Builder (Length: {0})", l), ReverseSB, iterations, text);
                Benchmark(String.Format("Array.Reverse (Length: {0})", l), ReverseArray, iterations, text);
                Benchmark(String.Format("Xor (Length: {0})", l), ReverseXor, iterations, text);

                Console.WriteLine();    
            }

            Console.Read();
        }
    }
}

Here are the results:

26251 Ticks String Builder (Length: 1) : called 10000 times.
33373 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 1) : called 10000 times.
20162 Ticks Xor (Length: 1) : called 10000 times.

51321 Ticks String Builder (Length: 10) : called 10000 times.
37105 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 10) : called 10000 times.
23974 Ticks Xor (Length: 10) : called 10000 times.

66570 Ticks String Builder (Length: 15) : called 10000 times.
26027 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 15) : called 10000 times.
24017 Ticks Xor (Length: 15) : called 10000 times.

101609 Ticks String Builder (Length: 25) : called 10000 times.
28472 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 25) : called 10000 times.
35355 Ticks Xor (Length: 25) : called 10000 times.

161601 Ticks String Builder (Length: 50) : called 10000 times.
35839 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 50) : called 10000 times.
51185 Ticks Xor (Length: 50) : called 10000 times.

230898 Ticks String Builder (Length: 75) : called 10000 times.
40628 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 75) : called 10000 times.
78906 Ticks Xor (Length: 75) : called 10000 times.

312017 Ticks String Builder (Length: 100) : called 10000 times.
52225 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 100) : called 10000 times.
110195 Ticks Xor (Length: 100) : called 10000 times.

2970691 Ticks String Builder (Length: 1000) : called 10000 times.
292094 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 1000) : called 10000 times.
846585 Ticks Xor (Length: 1000) : called 10000 times.

305564115 Ticks String Builder (Length: 100000) : called 10000 times.
74884495 Ticks Array.Reverse (Length: 100000) : called 10000 times.
125409674 Ticks Xor (Length: 100000) : called 10000 times.

It seems that Xor can be faster for short strings.

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1  
That doesn't return a string - you need to wrap this in a call to "new String(...)" –  Greg Beech Oct 23 '08 at 0:43
7  
These methods don't handle strings containing characters outside of the Base Multilingual Plane, i.e., Unicode characters >= U+10000 that are represented with two C# chars. I've posted an answer that handles such strings correctly. –  Bradley Grainger Oct 23 '08 at 3:42

Here a solution that properly reverses the string "Les Mise\u0301rables" as "selbare\u0301siM seL". This should render just like selbarésiM seL, not selbaŕesiM seL (note the position of the accent), as would the result of most implementations based on code units (Array.Reverse, etc) or even code points (reversing with special care for surrogate pairs).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Globalization;
using System.Linq;

public static class Test
{
    private static IEnumerable<string> GraphemeClusters(this string s) {
        var enumerator = StringInfo.GetTextElementEnumerator(s);
        while(enumerator.MoveNext()) {
            yield return (string)enumerator.Current;
        }
    }
    private static string ReverseGraphemeClusters(this string s) {
        return string.Join("", s.GraphemeClusters().Reverse().ToArray());
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        var s = "Les Mise\u0301rables";
        var r = s.ReverseGraphemeClusters();
        Console.WriteLine(r);
    }
}

(And live running example here: https://ideone.com/DqAeMJ)

It simply uses the .NET API for grapheme cluster iteration, which has been there since ever, but a bit "hidden" from view, it seems.

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2  
+1 One of the very few correct answers, and a lot more elegant and future proof than any of the others, IMO –  sehe Feb 27 '13 at 12:29
2  
It's funny how most of the other answerers are trying to shave ms off of what are otherwise incorrect approaches. How representative. –  G. Stoynev Dec 5 '13 at 19:38

If the string contains Unicode data (strictly speaking, non-BMP characters) the other methods that have been posted will corrupt it, because you cannot swap the order of high and low surrogate code units when reversing the string. (More information about this can be found on my blog.)

The following code sample will correctly reverse a string that contains non-BMP characters, e.g., "\U00010380\U00010381" (Ugaritic Letter Alpa, Ugaritic Letter Beta).

public static string Reverse(this string input)
{
    if (input == null)
    	throw new ArgumentNullException("input");

    // allocate a buffer to hold the output
    char[] output = new char[input.Length];
    for (int outputIndex = 0, inputIndex = input.Length - 1; outputIndex < input.Length; outputIndex++, inputIndex--)
    {
    	// check for surrogate pair
    	if (input[inputIndex] >= 0xDC00 && input[inputIndex] <= 0xDFFF &&
    		inputIndex > 0 && input[inputIndex - 1] >= 0xD800 && input[inputIndex - 1] <= 0xDBFF)
    	{
    		// preserve the order of the surrogate pair code units
    		output[outputIndex + 1] = input[inputIndex];
    		output[outputIndex] = input[inputIndex - 1];
    		outputIndex++;
    		inputIndex--;
    	}
    	else
    	{
    		output[outputIndex] = input[inputIndex];
    	}
    }

    return new string(output);
}
share|improve this answer
26  
Actually, chars in C# are 16-bit UTF-16 code units; a supplementary character is encoded using two of them, so this is necessary, –  Bradley Grainger Oct 23 '08 at 15:14
10  
It seems like System.String really ought to expose a HereBeDragons property for strings that contain Unicode supplementary characters. –  Robert Rossney Oct 23 '08 at 20:54
4  
@SebastianNegraszus: That's correct: this method just reverses the codepoints in the string. Reversing the grapheme clusters would probably be more "useful" overall (but what's the "use" of reversing an arbitrary string in the first place?), but is not easy to implement with just the built-in methods in the .NET Framework. –  Bradley Grainger Nov 6 '12 at 14:38
2  
@Richard: The rules for breaking grapheme clusters are a little more complicated than just detecting combining code points; see the documentation on Grapheme Cluster Boundaries in UAX #29 for more information. –  Bradley Grainger Feb 5 '13 at 16:56

Ok, in the interest of "don't repeat yourself," I offer the following solution:

public string Reverse(string text)
{
   return Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings.StrReverse(text);
}

My understanding is that this implementation, available by default in VB.NET, properly handles Unicode characters.

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5  
This only handles surrogates properly. It messes up combining marks: ideone.com/yikdqX. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 3 '13 at 21:52

Greg Beech posted an unsafe option that is indeed as fast as it gets (it's an in-place reversal); but, as he indicated in his answer, it's a completely disastrous idea.

That said, I'm surprised there is so much of a consensus that Array.Reverse is the fastest method. There's still an unsafe approach that returns a reversed copy of a string (no in-place reversal shenanigans) significantly faster than the Array.Reverse method for small strings:

public static unsafe string Reverse(string text)
{
    int len = text.Length;

    // Why allocate a char[] array on the heap when you won't use it
    // outside of this method? Use the stack.
    char* reversed = stackalloc char[len];

    // Avoid bounds-checking performance penalties.
    fixed (char* str = text)
    {
        int i = 0;
        int j = i + len - 1;
        while (i < len)
        {
            reversed[i++] = str[j--];
        }
    }

    // Need to use this overload for the System.String constructor
    // as providing just the char* pointer could result in garbage
    // at the end of the string (no guarantee of null terminator).
    return new string(reversed, 0, len);
}

Here are some benchmark results.

You can see that the performance gain shrinks and then disappears against the Array.Reverse method as the strings get larger. For small- to medium-sized strings, though, it's tough to beat this method.

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If you want to play a really dangerous game, then this is by far the fastest way there is (around four times faster than the Array.Reverse method). It's an in-place reverse using pointers.

Note that I really do not recommend this for any use, ever (have a look here for some reasons why you should not use this method), but it's just interesting to see that it can be done, and that strings aren't really immutable once you turn on unsafe code.

public static unsafe string Reverse(string text)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
    {
        return text;
    }

    fixed (char* pText = text)
    {
        char* pStart = pText;
        char* pEnd = pText + text.Length - 1;
        for (int i = text.Length / 2; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            char temp = *pStart;
            *pStart++ = *pEnd;
            *pEnd-- = temp;
        }

        return text;
    }
}
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hi we can use Like this also above 3.5 Framework

public string ReverseString(string srtVarable)
{
    return new string(srtVarable.Reverse().ToArray());
}
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Firstly you don't need to call ToCharArray as a string can already be indexed as a char array, so this will save you an allocation.

The next optimisation is to use a StringBuilder to prevent unnecessary allocations (as strings are immutable, concatenating them makes a copy of the string each time). To further optimise this we pre-set the length of the StringBuilder so it won't need to expand its buffer.

public string Reverse(string text)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
    {
        return text;
    }

    StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(text.Length);
    for (int i = text.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
        builder.Append(text[i]);
    }

    return builder.ToString();
}

Edit: Performance Data

I tested this function and the function using Array.Reverse with the following simple program, where Reverse1 is one function and Reverse2 is the other:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var text = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";

    // pre-jit
    text = Reverse1(text); 
    text = Reverse2(text);

    // test
    var timer1 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (var i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
    {
        text = Reverse1(text);
    }

    timer1.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("First: {0}", timer1.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    var timer2 = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (var i = 0; i < 10000000; i++)
    {
        text = Reverse2(text);
    }

    timer2.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Second: {0}", timer2.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

It turns out that for short strings the Array.Reverse method is around twice as quick as the one above, and for longer strings the difference is even more pronounced. So given that the Array.Reverse method is both simpler and faster I'd recommend you use that rather than this one. I leave this one up here just to show that it isn't the way you should do it (much to my surprise!)

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public static string Reverse(string input)
{
    return string.Concat(Enumerable.Reverse(input));
}

Of course you can extend string class with Reverse method

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string Reverse(this string input)
    {
        return string.Concat(Enumerable.Reverse(input));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I like this answer. Nice and compact. –  David West Jun 4 '13 at 19:34

Try using Array.Reverse


public string Reverse(string str)
{
    char[] array = str.ToCharArray();
    Array.Reverse(array);
    return new string(array);
}
share|improve this answer

Had to submit a recursive example:

private static string Reverse(string str)
{
    if (str.Length == 1)
        return str;
    else
        return str[str.Length - 1] + Reverse(str.Substring(0, str.Length - 1));
}
share|improve this answer
1  
string of Length 0 are not handled –  modosansreves May 15 '13 at 14:07

Have a look at the wikipedia entry here. They implement the String.Reverse extension method. This allows you to write code like this:

string s = "olleh";
s.Reverse();

They also use the ToCharArray/Reverse combination that other answers to this question suggest. The source code looks like this:

public static string Reverse(this string input)
{
    char[] chars = input.ToCharArray();
    Array.Reverse(chars);
    return new String(chars);
}
share|improve this answer

Sorry for long post, but this might be interesting

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        public static string ReverseUsingArrayClass(string text)
        {
            char[] chars = text.ToCharArray();
            Array.Reverse(chars);
            return new string(chars);
        }

        public static string ReverseUsingCharacterBuffer(string text)
        {
            char[] charArray = new char[text.Length];
            int inputStrLength = text.Length - 1;
            for (int idx = 0; idx <= inputStrLength; idx++) 
            {
                charArray[idx] = text[inputStrLength - idx];                
            }
            return new string(charArray);
        }

        public static string ReverseUsingStringBuilder(string text)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
            {
                return text;
            }

            StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(text.Length);
            for (int i = text.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                builder.Append(text[i]);
            }

            return builder.ToString();
        }

        private static string ReverseUsingStack(string input)
        {
            Stack<char> resultStack = new Stack<char>();
            foreach (char c in input)
            {
                resultStack.Push(c);
            }

            StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
            while (resultStack.Count > 0)
            {
                sb.Append(resultStack.Pop());
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }

        public static string ReverseUsingXOR(string text)
        {
            char[] charArray = text.ToCharArray();
            int length = text.Length - 1;
            for (int i = 0; i < length; i++, length--)
            {
                charArray[i] ^= charArray[length];
                charArray[length] ^= charArray[i];
                charArray[i] ^= charArray[length];
            }

            return new string(charArray);
        }


        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string testString = string.Join(";", new string[] {
                new string('a', 100), 
                new string('b', 101), 
                new string('c', 102), 
                new string('d', 103),                                                                   
            });
            int cycleCount = 100000;

            Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
            stopwatch.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < cycleCount; i++) 
            {
                ReverseUsingCharacterBuffer(testString);
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("ReverseUsingCharacterBuffer: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");

            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < cycleCount; i++) 
            {
                ReverseUsingArrayClass(testString);
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("ReverseUsingArrayClass: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");

            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < cycleCount; i++) 
            {
                ReverseUsingStringBuilder(testString);
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("ReverseUsingStringBuilder: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");

            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < cycleCount; i++) 
            {
                ReverseUsingStack(testString);
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("ReverseUsingStack: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");

            stopwatch.Reset();
            stopwatch.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < cycleCount; i++) 
            {
                ReverseUsingXOR(testString);
            }
            stopwatch.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("ReverseUsingXOR: " + stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds + "ms");            
        }
    }
}

Results:

  • ReverseUsingCharacterBuffer: 346ms
  • ReverseUsingArrayClass: 87ms
  • ReverseUsingStringBuilder: 824ms
  • ReverseUsingStack: 2086ms
  • ReverseUsingXOR: 319ms
share|improve this answer

How about:

    private string Reverse(string stringToReverse)
    {
        char[] rev = stringToReverse.Reverse().ToArray();
        return new string(rev); 
    }
share|improve this answer

"Better way" depends on what is more important to you in your situation, performance, elegance, maintainability etc.

Anyway, here's an approach using Array.Reverse:

string inputString="The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.";
char[] charArray = inputString.ToCharArray(); 
Array.Reverse(charArray); 

string reversed = new string(charArray);
share|improve this answer

Don't bother with a function, just do it in place. Note: The second line will throw an argument exception in the Immediate window of some VS versions.

string s = "Blah";
s = new string(s.ToCharArray().Reverse().ToArray()); 
share|improve this answer

Stack-based solution.

    public static string Reverse(string text)
    {
        var stack = new Stack<char>(text);
        var array = new char[stack.Count];

        int i = 0;
        while (stack.Count != 0)
        {
            array[i++] = stack.Pop();
        }

        return new string(array);
    }

Or

    public static string Reverse(string text)
    {
        var stack = new Stack<char>(text);
        return string.Join("", stack);
    }
share|improve this answer

Before I discovered that everyone was posting their test results to this thread I wrote this up on my blog. Essentially the results of my tests on 10 and 500 character strings show that the Array.Reverse() function wins the game and that's why I've marked this one as the correct answer.

Much obliged to everyone for helping me with this. You guys rock!

share|improve this answer
public static string Reverse2(string x)
        {
            char[] charArray = new char[x.Length];
            int len = x.Length - 1;
            for (int i = 0; i <= len; i++)
                charArray[i] = x[len - i];
            return new string(charArray);
        }
share|improve this answer
private static string Reverse(string str)
        {
            string revStr = string.Empty;
            for (int i = str.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
            {
                revStr += str[i].ToString();
            }
            return revStr;
        }

Faster than above method

private static string ReverseEx(string str)
        {
            char[] chrArray = str.ToCharArray();
            int len = chrArray.Length - 1;
            char rev = 'n';
            for (int i = 0; i <= len/2; i++)
            {
                rev = chrArray[i];
                chrArray[i] = chrArray[len - i];
                chrArray[len - i] = rev;
            }
            return new string(chrArray);
        }
share|improve this answer
public string Reverse(string input)
{
    char[] output = new char[input.Length];

    int forwards = 0;
    int backwards = input.Length - 1;

    do
    {
        output[forwards] = input[backwards];
        output[backwards] = input[forwards];
    }while(++forwards <= --backwards);

    return new String(output);
}

public string DotNetReverse(string input)
{
    char[] toReverse = input.ToCharArray();
    Array.Reverse(toReverse);
    return new String(toReverse);
}

public string NaiveReverse(string input)
{
    char[] outputArray = new char[input.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < input.Length; i++)
    {
        outputArray[i] = input[input.Length - 1 - i];
    }

    return new String(outputArray);
}    

public string RecursiveReverse(string input)
{
    return RecursiveReverseHelper(input, 0, input.Length - 1);
}

public string RecursiveReverseHelper(string input, int startIndex , int endIndex)
{
    if (startIndex == endIndex)
    {
        return "" + input[startIndex];
    }

    if (endIndex - startIndex == 1)
    {
        return "" + input[endIndex] + input[startIndex];
    }

    return input[endIndex] + RecursiveReverseHelper(input, startIndex + 1, endIndex - 1) + input[startIndex];
}


void Main()
{
    int[] sizes = new int[] { 10, 100, 1000, 10000 };
    for(int sizeIndex = 0; sizeIndex < sizes.Length; sizeIndex++)
    {
        string holaMundo  = "";
        for(int i = 0; i < sizes[sizeIndex]; i+= 5)
        {   
            holaMundo += "ABCDE";
        }

        string.Format("\n**** For size: {0} ****\n", sizes[sizeIndex]).Dump();

        string odnuMaloh = DotNetReverse(holaMundo);

        var stopWatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        string result = NaiveReverse(holaMundo);
        ("Naive Ticks: " + stopWatch.ElapsedTicks).Dump();

        stopWatch.Restart();
        result = Reverse(holaMundo);
        ("Efficient linear Ticks: " + stopWatch.ElapsedTicks).Dump();

        stopWatch.Restart();
        result = RecursiveReverse(holaMundo);
        ("Recursive Ticks: " + stopWatch.ElapsedTicks).Dump();

        stopWatch.Restart();
        result = DotNetReverse(holaMundo);
        ("DotNet Reverse Ticks: " + stopWatch.ElapsedTicks).Dump();
    }
}

Output

For size: 10

Naive Ticks: 1
Efficient linear Ticks: 0
Recursive Ticks: 2
DotNet Reverse Ticks: 1

For size: 100

Naive Ticks: 2
Efficient linear Ticks: 1
Recursive Ticks: 12
DotNet Reverse Ticks: 1

For size: 1000

Naive Ticks: 5
Efficient linear Ticks: 2
Recursive Ticks: 358
DotNet Reverse Ticks: 9

For size: 10000

Naive Ticks: 32
Efficient linear Ticks: 28
Recursive Ticks: 84808
DotNet Reverse Ticks: 33
share|improve this answer

If you have a string that only contains ASCII characters, you can use this method.

    public static string ASCIIReverse(string s)
    {
        byte[] reversed = new byte[s.Length];

        int k = 0;
        for (int i = s.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            reversed[k++] = (byte)s[i];
        }

        return Encoding.ASCII.GetString(reversed);
    }
share|improve this answer

If it ever came up in an interview and you were told you can't use Array.Reverse, i think this might be one of the fastest. It does not create new strings and iterates only over half of the array (i.e O(n/2) iterations)

    public static string ReverseString(string stringToReverse)
    {
        char[] charArray = stringToReverse.ToCharArray();
        int len = charArray.Length-1;
        int mid = len / 2;

        for (int i = 0; i < mid; i++)
        {
            char tmp = charArray[i];
            charArray[i] = charArray[len - i];
            charArray[len - i] = tmp;
        }
        return new string(charArray);
    }
share|improve this answer
2  
I'm pretty certain stringToReverse.ToCharArray() call will produce a O(N) execution time. –  Marcel Valdez Orozco Sep 8 '12 at 5:35
string A = null;
//a now is reversed and you can use it
A = SimulateStrReverse.StrReverse("your string");

public static class SimulateStrReverse
{
    public static string StrReverse(string expression)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(expression))
            return string.Empty;

        string reversedString = string.Empty;
        for (int charIndex = expression.Length - 1; charIndex >= 0; charIndex--)
        {
            reversedString += expression[charIndex];
        }
        return reversedString;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I've made a C# port from Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings. I'm not sure why they keep such useful functions (from VB) outside the System.String in Framework, but still under Microsoft.VisualBasic. Same scenario for financial functions (e.g. Microsoft.VisualBasic.Financial.Pmt()).

public static string StrReverse(this string expression)
{
    if ((expression == null))
        return "";

    int srcIndex;

    var length = expression.Length;
    if (length == 0)
        return "";

    //CONSIDER: Get System.String to add a surrogate aware Reverse method

    //Detect if there are any graphemes that need special handling
    for (srcIndex = 0; srcIndex <= length - 1; srcIndex++)
    {
        var ch = expression[srcIndex];
        var uc = char.GetUnicodeCategory(ch);
        if (uc == UnicodeCategory.Surrogate || uc == UnicodeCategory.NonSpacingMark || uc == UnicodeCategory.SpacingCombiningMark || uc == UnicodeCategory.EnclosingMark)
        {
            //Need to use special handling
            return InternalStrReverse(expression, srcIndex, length);
        }
    }

    var chars = expression.ToCharArray();
    Array.Reverse(chars);
    return new string(chars);
}

///<remarks>This routine handles reversing Strings containing graphemes
/// GRAPHEME: a text element that is displayed as a single character</remarks>
private static string InternalStrReverse(string expression, int srcIndex, int length)
{
    //This code can only be hit one time
    var sb = new StringBuilder(length) { Length = length };

    var textEnum = StringInfo.GetTextElementEnumerator(expression, srcIndex);

    //Init enumerator position
    if (!textEnum.MoveNext())
    {
        return "";
    }

    var lastSrcIndex = 0;
    var destIndex = length - 1;

    //Copy up the first surrogate found
    while (lastSrcIndex < srcIndex)
    {
        sb[destIndex] = expression[lastSrcIndex];
        destIndex -= 1;
        lastSrcIndex += 1;
    }

    //Now iterate through the text elements and copy them to the reversed string
    var nextSrcIndex = textEnum.ElementIndex;

    while (destIndex >= 0)
    {
        srcIndex = nextSrcIndex;

        //Move to next element
        nextSrcIndex = (textEnum.MoveNext()) ? textEnum.ElementIndex : length;
        lastSrcIndex = nextSrcIndex - 1;

        while (lastSrcIndex >= srcIndex)
        {
            sb[destIndex] = expression[lastSrcIndex];
            destIndex -= 1;
            lastSrcIndex -= 1;
        }
    }

    return sb.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer

string resultString= "original";

string reverso = string.Join("", resultString.Reverse().ToArray());

share|improve this answer

First of all what you have to understand is that str+= will resize your string memory to make space for 1 extra char. This is fine, but if you have, say, a book with 1000 pages that you want to reverse, this will take very long to execute.

The solution that some people might suggest is using StringBuilder. What string builder does when you perform a += is that it allocates much larger chunks of memory to hold the new character so that it does not need to do a reallocation every time you add a char.

If you really want a fast and minimal solution I'd suggest the following:

            char[] chars = new char[str.Length];
            for (int i = str.Length - 1, j = 0; i >= 0; --i, ++j)
            {
                chars[j] = str[i];
            }
            str = new String(chars);

In this solution there is one initial memory allocation when the char[] is initialized and one allocation when the string constructor builds the string from the char array.

On my system I ran a test for you that reverses a string of 2 750 000 characters. Here are the results for 10 executions:

StringBuilder: 190K - 200K ticks

Char Array: 130K - 160K ticks

I also ran a test for normal String += but I abandoned it after 10 minutes with no output.

However, I also noticed that for smaller strings the StringBuilder is faster, so you will have to decide on the implementation based on the input.

Cheers

share|improve this answer

The easy and nice answer is using the Extension Method:

static class ExtentionMethodCollection
{
    public static string Inverse(this string BASE)
    {
        return new string(BASE.Reverse().ToArray());
    }
}

and here's the output:

string Answer = "12345".Inverse(); // = "54321"
share|improve this answer
    string original = "Stack Overflow";
    string reversed = new string(original.Reverse().ToArray());
share|improve this answer
1  
This is a duplicate of several of the other answers on this page. –  BradleyDotNET Mar 12 at 19:24

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