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I have a code which uses bit-fields declared as follows

typedef struct my{
    const char *name;
    uint8_t is_alpha : 1;   
    uint8_t is_hwaccel : 1; 
    uint8_t x_chroma_shift; 
    uint8_t y_chroma_shift; 

} mystr; 

uint8_t is typedef'ed to unsigned char.

Building the code in MS-VS 2008 using this bit fields gives a warning as below:

imgconvert.c(60) : warning C4214: nonstandard extension used : bit-field types other than int.
  1. Is there any problems/potential issues in using bit fields of type other than int? Why the warning?
  2. Are other than int type bit-fileds they allowed by C99 C language specification?
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1  
The warning is pretty self-explanatory: nonstandard extension used ; your code may have portability problems. –  Mehrdad Afshari Feb 17 '10 at 12:28
    
@Mehrad:Using type int is useful from portability aspects only if all targets/compiler have same sized ints. –  goldenmean Feb 17 '10 at 12:51
    
you are writing about bitfields here, their size is specified in the code. –  AProgrammer Feb 17 '10 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

1] Is there any problems/potential issues in using bit fields of type other than int? Why the warning?

Since bit-fields are low-level, there may be issues with portability if you are using non-standard types. Hence the warning -- note it is still a warning and not an error.

2] Are other than int type bit-fileds they allowed by C99 C language specification?

From the draft of C99:

6.7.2.1 Structure and union specifiers

4 A bit-field shall have a type that is a qualified or unqualified version of _Bool, signed int, unsigned int, or some other implementation-defined type.

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5  
Isn't "some other implementation-defined type" remarkably useless in a standards document? –  anon Feb 17 '10 at 12:34
    
@Neil Butterworth: ATM, I just have the draft. Will need to look up the actual though. But, yes, I guess you are right. –  dirkgently Feb 17 '10 at 12:42
    
@dirkgently: Using type int is useful from portability aspects only if all targets/compiler are guaranteed to have same sized ints. Is this a reasonable assumption. I dont know thats why i am asking. –  goldenmean Feb 17 '10 at 12:51
    
@goldenmean: No, the standard gurantess only char to have the same size across all machines. The size of an intis defined only as a range so it's not very useful from the portability perspective. The stdint header was added for this purpose to C99. I guess you should be okay with the warning. –  dirkgently Feb 17 '10 at 13:01
1  
@dirkgently, sizeof(char) is one, but that doesn't mean CHAR_BIT is the same on all platforms. –  AProgrammer Feb 17 '10 at 13:31

Why not use int? The actual implementation of bitfields varies from compiler to compiler. If you want to write portable code, use int. If you want to create a small structure, or a structure of a fixed number of bytes, or a structure where the bits are in a fixed position, don't use bitfields. Create a uint8_t member called something like flags and define macros to use as bitmasks.

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You mean unsigned int. uint8_t is unsigned, int is signed, mixing them is no good. –  kennytm Feb 17 '10 at 16:49
    
I haven't personally used bitfields in code, but if it's a 1-bit bitfield, does the sign matter? –  tomlogic Feb 17 '10 at 16:58

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