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I was using a regular expression for email formats which I thought was ok but the customer is complaining that the expression is too strict. So they have come back with the following requirement:

The email must contain an "@" symbol and end with either .xx or .xxx ie.(.nl or .com). They are happy with this to pass validation. I have started the expression to see if the string contains an "@" symbol as below

^(?=.*[@])

this seems to work but how do I add the last requirement (must end with .xx or .xxx)?

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Depending of the used language, try: \.\w{2,3}$ But there are some domaind endings with more than 3 characters: *.info, ... –  tur1ng Feb 17 '10 at 13:52
1  
@tur1ng: And, indeed, .museum. –  Charles Stewart Feb 17 '10 at 13:54
    
+1: Never heared of that one ;-) –  tur1ng Feb 17 '10 at 13:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A regex simply enforcing your two requirements is:

^.+@.+\.[a-zA-Z]{2,3}$

However, there are email validation libraries for most languages that will generally work better than a regex.

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I always use this for emails

          ^([a-zA-Z0-9_\-\.]+)@((\[[0-9]{1,3}" +
            @"\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.)|(([a-zA-Z0-9\-]+\" +
            @".)+))([a-zA-Z]{2,4}|[0-9]{1,3})(\]?)$

Try http://www.ultrapico.com/Expresso.htm as well!

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It is not possible to validate every E-Mail Adress with RegEx but for your requirements this simple regex works. It is neither complete nor does it in any way check for errors but it exactly meets the specs:

[^@]+@.+\.\w{2,3}$

Explanation:

  • [^@]+: Match one or more characters that are not @
  • @: Match the @
  • .+: Match one or more of any character
  • \.: Match a .
  • \w{2,3}: Match 2 or 3 word-characters (a-zA-Z)
  • $: End of string
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Try this :

([\w-\.]+)@((?:[\w]+\.)+)([a-zA-Z]{2,4})\be(\w*)s\b

A good tool to test our regular expression : http://gskinner.com/RegExr/

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, mainly, and the RegExp tester at gskinner is what I use too. I'm curious why you include literal "e" + any whitespace + "s" at the end. Your expression will fail at foo@bar.com, for example. Simply using ([\w-\.]+)@((?:[\w]+\.)+)([a-zA-Z]{2,4})\b will succeed. –  Robusto Feb 17 '10 at 14:03

You could use

[@].+\.[a-z0-9]{2,3}$
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Are digits allowed in top-level domains? –  tur1ng Feb 17 '10 at 13:53
    
IPs are technically allowed in emails ... that's why I added the 0-9. –  Dominik Feb 17 '10 at 14:04

This should work:

^[^@\r\n\s]+[^.@]@[^.@][^@\r\n\s]+\.(\w){2,}$

I tested it against these invalid emails:

@exampleexample@domaincom.com   
example@domaincom  
exampledomain.com  
exampledomain@.com  
exampledomain.@com  
example.domain@.@com  

e.x+a.1m.5e@em.a.i.l.c.o  

some-user@internal-email.company.c  
some-user@internal-ema@il.company.co  
some-user@@internal-email.company.co  

@test.com  
test@asdaf  
test@.com    
test.@com.co  

And these valid emails:

example@domain.com  
e.x+a.1m.5e@em.a.i.l.c.om  
some-user@internal-email.company.co 

edit

This one appears to validate all of the addresses from that wikipedia page, though it probably allows some invalid emails as well. The parenthesis will split it into everything before and after the @:

^([^\r\n]+)@([^\r\n]+\.?\w{2,})$

niceandsimple@example.com
very.common@example.com
a.little.lengthy.but.fine@dept.example.com
disposable.style.email.with+symbol@example.com
other.email-with-dash@example.com
user@[IPv6:2001:db8:1ff::a0b:dbd0]
"much.more unusual"@example.com
"very.unusual.@.unusual.com"@example.com
"very.(),:;<>[]\".VERY.\"very@\\ \"very\".unusual"@strange.example.com
postbox@com
admin@mailserver1
 !#$%&'*+-/=?^_`{}|~@example.org
"()<>[]:,;@\\\"!#$%&'*+-/=?^_`{}| ~.a"@example.org
" "@example.org
üñîçøðé@example.com
üñîçøðé@üñîçøðé.com
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2  
    
Wow thank you. This is exactly what I was looking for. Probably should have googled that before I started making the regex. –  BrettLefty Feb 19 at 23:23

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