Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The Python docs clearly state that x==y calls x.__eq__(y). However it seems that under many circumstances, the opposite is true. Where is it documented when or why this happens, and how can I work out for sure whether my object's __cmp__ or __eq__ methods are going to get called.

Edit: Just to clarify, I know that __eq__ is called in preferecne to __cmp__, but I'm not clear why y.__eq__(x) is called in preference to x.__eq__(y), when the latter is what the docs state will happen.

>>> class TestCmp(object):
...     def __cmp__(self, other):
...         print "__cmp__ got called"
...         return 0
... 
>>> class TestEq(object):
...     def __eq__(self, other):
...         print "__eq__ got called"
...         return True
... 
>>> tc = TestCmp()
>>> te = TestEq()
>>> 
>>> 1 == tc
__cmp__ got called
True
>>> tc == 1
__cmp__ got called
True
>>> 
>>> 1 == te
__eq__ got called
True
>>> te == 1
__eq__ got called
True
>>> 
>>> class TestStrCmp(str):
...     def __new__(cls, value):
...         return str.__new__(cls, value)
...     
...     def __cmp__(self, other):
...         print "__cmp__ got called"
...         return 0
... 
>>> class TestStrEq(str):
...     def __new__(cls, value):
...         return str.__new__(cls, value)
...     
...     def __eq__(self, other):
...         print "__eq__ got called"
...         return True
... 
>>> tsc = TestStrCmp("a")
>>> tse = TestStrEq("a")
>>> 
>>> "b" == tsc
False
>>> tsc == "b"
False
>>> 
>>> "b" == tse
__eq__ got called
True
>>> tse == "b"
__eq__ got called
True

Edit: From Mark Dickinson's answer and comment it would appear that:

  1. Rich comparison overrides __cmp__
  2. __eq__ is it's own __rop__ to it's __op__ (and similar for __lt__, __ge__, etc)
  3. If the left object is a builtin or new-style class, and the right is a subclass of it, the right object's __rop__ is tried before the left object's __op__

This explains the behaviour in theTestStrCmp examples. TestStrCmp is a subclass of str but doesn't implement its own __eq__ so the __eq__ of str takes precedence in both cases (ie tsc == "b" calls b.__eq__(tsc) as an __rop__ because of rule 1).

In the TestStrEq examples, tse.__eq__ is called in both instances because TestStrEq is a subclass of str and so it is called in preference.

In the TestEq examples, TestEq implements __eq__ and int doesn't so __eq__ gets called both times (rule 1).

But I still don't understand the very first example with TestCmp. tc is not a subclass on int so AFAICT 1.__cmp__(tc) should be called, but isn't.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

You're missing a key exception to the usual behaviour: when the right-hand operand is an instance of a subclass of the class of the left-hand operand, the special method for the right-hand operand is called first.

See the documentation at:

http://docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html#coercion-rules

and in particular, the following two paragraphs:

For objects x and y, first x.__op__(y) is tried. If this is not implemented or returns NotImplemented, y.__rop__(x) is tried. If this is also not implemented or returns NotImplemented, a TypeError exception is raised. But see the following exception:

Exception to the previous item: if the left operand is an instance of a built-in type or a new-style class, and the right operand is an instance of a proper subclass of that type or class and overrides the base’s __rop__() method, the right operand’s __rop__() method is tried before the left operand’s __op__() method.

share|improve this answer
    
@Daniel Pryden: Thanks for the formatting fixes! I'll try to remember blockquote next time. –  Mark Dickinson Feb 17 '10 at 20:15
3  
Agreed that you're not using any __rop__ methods. The comparison methods are special in this respect: __eq__ is its own reverse, so read __eq__ for both __op__ and __rop__. (Similarly, __ne__ is its own reverse, __le__ is the reverse of __ge__, etc.) Others have commented before (correctly, IMO) that the documentation could use some work here. I'm almost certain that the __rop__ methods aren't deprecated! –  Mark Dickinson Feb 17 '10 at 20:54
3  
See docs.python.org/reference/datamodel.html#object.__lt__. The fourth paragraph starts: "There are no swapped-argument versions of these methods [...] rather, __lt__() and __gt__() are each other’s reflection, __le__() and __ge__() are each other’s reflection, and __eq__() and __ne__() are their own reflection." Or were you asking for evidence that the __rop__ methods aren't deprecated? –  Mark Dickinson Feb 18 '10 at 9:35
2  
No, I think it's right: __lt__ is the __rop__ of __gt__. There's no logical negation going on; just a reversal of the arguments. The translation is: x.__lt__(y) <=> x < y <=> y > x <=> y.__gt__(x). –  Mark Dickinson Feb 18 '10 at 16:37
2  
The rules for __cmp__ (especially in combination with rich comparisons) are truly hairy, and I don't think they're even properly documented anywhere, except in the source. (PyObject_RichCompare in the Objects/object.c file is the main place to look, if you feel inclined.) In the 1 == tc example, neither side implements __eq__, so we fall back on __cmp__. int.__cmp__ can only handle comparisons with other integers, so it's ignored (not even called), and your TestCmp.__cmp__ method gets called instead. Getting rid of __cmp__ in py3k was a Very Good Thing. :) –  Mark Dickinson Feb 18 '10 at 17:08

Actually, in the docs, it states:

[__cmp__ is c]alled by comparison operations if rich comparison (see above) is not defined.

__eq__ is a rich comparison method and, in the case of TestCmp, is not defined, hence the calling of __cmp__

share|improve this answer
    
But str.__eq__ is defined, so presumably TestStrCmp.__eq__ is defined (inherited). –  dubiousjim Feb 17 '10 at 14:20
    
You are correct. I've made the appropriate edit... thanks –  Dancrumb Feb 17 '10 at 14:25
1  
You are right that __eq__ overrides __cmp__, but that was not the surprising behaviour. The surprise was that it calls it on the right object not the left one. (I've updated the question to clarify this a bit). –  Singletoned Feb 17 '10 at 14:36

As I know, __eq__() is a so-called “rich comparison” method, and is called for comparison operators in preference to __cmp__() below. __cmp__() is called if "rich comparison" is not defined.

So in A == B:
If __eq__() is defined in A it will be called
Else __cmp__() will be called

__eq__() defined in 'str' so your __cmp__() function was not called.

The same rule is for __ne__(), __gt__(), __ge__(), __lt__() and __le__() "rich comparison" methods.

share|improve this answer

Is this not documented in the Language Reference? Just from a quick look there, it looks like __cmp__ is ignored when __eq__, __lt__, etc are defined. I'm understanding that to include the case where __eq__ is defined on a parent class. str.__eq__ is already defined so __cmp__ on its subclasses will be ignored. object.__eq__ etc are not defined so __cmp__ on its subclasses will be honored.

In response to the clarified question:

I know that __eq__ is called in preferecne to __cmp__, but I'm not clear why y.__eq__(x) is called in preference to x.__eq__(y), when the latter is what the docs state will happen.

Docs say x.__eq__(y) will be called first, but it has the option to return NotImplemented in which case y.__eq__(x) is called. I'm not sure why you're confident something different is going on here.

Which case are you specifically puzzled about? I'm understanding you just to be puzzled about the "b" == tsc and tsc == "b" cases, correct? In either case, str.__eq__(onething, otherthing) is being called. Since you don't override the __eq__ method in TestStrCmp, eventually you're just relying on the base string method and it's saying the objects aren't equal.

Without knowing the implementation details of str.__eq__, I don't know whether ("b").__eq__(tsc) will return NotImplemented and give tsc a chance to handle the equality test. But even if it did, the way you have TestStrCmp defined, you're still going to get a false result.

So it's not clear what you're seeing here that's unexpected.

Perhaps what's happening is that Python is preferring __eq__ to __cmp__ if it's defined on either of the objects being compared, whereas you were expecting __cmp__ on the leftmost object to have priority over __eq__ on the righthand object. Is that it?

share|improve this answer
    
Having played with this a bit more, I think you are right that __eq__ is preferred on either object in these cases. –  Singletoned Feb 17 '10 at 15:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.