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My data:

> dput(head(tbl))
structure(c("a2p1u8", "a2qab2", "a6zl23", "a6zlf3", "a6zq61", 
"a6ztx1", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0.9339597", "0", "0", "0", "0", 
"0", "14.2445924", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", " 1.84391660", "0", 
"0", "0", "0", "0", "1.00000000", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0.85034470", 
"0", "0.06312408", "0", "0", "1.11684073", "1.00000000", "1.29478436", 
"0.135377134", "0", "0", "0.941579636", "0.389199799", "0.705215641", 
"0.34063483", "0", "0", "1.00000000", "0.46785766", "0", "1.43325438", 
"0", "0", "0", "0.15782118", "0", "1.71425096", "0", "0", "0", 
"0.38274080", "0", " 0.71553232", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", 
"0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", 
"0", "0", "0", "0", "1.72759758", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "1.712898580", 
"0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0.74788829", "1.00000000", "0", "0", 
"0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", 
"0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", 
"0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "0", "1.29452015", "0", "0", 
"0", "0", "0", "0.85273992", "0", "0", "0"), .Dim = c(6L, 25L
), .Dimnames = list(NULL, c("Gene name", "2_1", "2_2", "2_3", 
"2_4", "2_5", "2_6", "2_7", "2_8", "2_9", "2_10", "2_11", "2_12", 
"2_13", "2_14", "2_15", "2_16", "2_17", "2_18", "2_19", "2_20", 
"2_21", "2_22", "2_23", "2_24")))

As an output I want to get a new data.frame/matrix with the same number of rows and columns and with the number 1 in the cells which this function finds a peak.

which(diff(sign(diff(Gene name)))==-2)+1

How to find a peak in each row of data.frame ?

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by "finds a peak"? The structure you have provided corresponds to a character matrix. You probably want all but the first column as numeric, so a good start would be to coerce to a data frame and change the data type: tbl.df <- as.data.frame(tbl, stringsAsFactors=FALSE); tbl.df[, -1] <- apply(tbl.df[, -1], 2, as.numeric). –  jbaums Apr 2 '14 at 14:15
    
This is a function which I want to use (it is used for "finding peaks"): which(diff(sign(diff(Gene name - name of the row)))==-2)+1 –  Shaxi Liver Apr 2 '14 at 14:26
1  
Still don't see what you mean by "find peaks." Trying to infer from your comment, since "Gene name" is a string (from which a numerical value cannot be easily inferred), and "name of the row" is not defined but defaults to the integers 1 through 6. Perhaps you could walk us through the calculation, if not in R code, then in human-readable math? For example, if you are treating each row as a separate sequence and "peak" is the same as "max", then perhaps the peak for "a2p1u8" would be column 2_15 (value of 1.727598). –  r2evans Apr 2 '14 at 14:58
    
I believe the OP wants to apply the function (which returns indices of 'peaks') to each row of the data. –  jbaums Apr 2 '14 at 14:59
    
Perhaps one of the following gives what you want/need apply(tbl.df[,-1], 1, function(rr) max(rr)), apply(tbl.df[,-1], 1, function(rr) which.max(rr)), or colnames(tbl.df)[1+apply(tbl.df[,-1], 1, function(rr) which.max(rr))]. –  r2evans Apr 2 '14 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you're trying to do is probably easiest with a numeric matrix, so we'll take the gene names and store them to use as row names, and we'll remove the gene column. We'll then add the row names and coerce the matrix to numeric (this last step should be done column by column, i.e. applying the as.numeric function over the 2nd dimension.

nm <- tbl[, 1]
tbl <- apply(tbl[, -1], 2, as.numeric)
row.names(tbl) <- nm

Now we can create a binary indicator matrix that shows whether diff(sign(diff(x))) is equal to -2. We do this by applying your function (slightly modified, removing the which call to ensure it returns a matrix of the desired dimensions) to the first dimension (rows) of tbl.

minus2 <- t(apply(tbl, 1, function(x) as.numeric(diff(sign(diff(x)))==-2)))

We want the columns to the right of those that were -2, so we can cbind a column of zeroes to the left minus2.

peaks <- cbind(0, minus2)

This produces:

peaks

#        [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10] [,11] [,12] [,13] [,14] [,15] [,16] [,17] [,18] [,19] [,20] [,21] [,22] [,23]
# a2p1u8    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     1     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
# a2qab2    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0
# a6zl23    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     1
# a6zlf3    0    0    0    0    0    1    0    1    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
# a6zq61    0    1    0    0    0    1    0    1    0     1     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
# a6ztx1    0    0    0    0    0    1    0    0    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
share|improve this answer
    
I noticed that my output has 23 columns, where the input has 24. This is due to the two diff calls, each of which shortens the vector by one. Not sure where that extra column belongs. –  jbaums Apr 2 '14 at 14:58
    
Do you have any idea what can we do to get this 24th column back to my data ? –  Shaxi Liver Apr 3 '14 at 8:13
    
One more comment:. I already noticed that we just added a column of 0s to the left but it should be like that. Sometimes there might be a higher number in first column than in second one so that means there is a peak. Do you know how to do it properly ? Maybe my assumption to use such function wasn't correct. –  Shaxi Liver Apr 3 '14 at 8:29
1  
I added the column of zeroes to the left because your function returns indices of cells to the right of cells for which the function is equal to -2. Unless I've misinterpreted something, this means that there can't be any 1's in the leftmost column. –  jbaums Apr 3 '14 at 8:56
1  
If you do so, make sure you are very clear about what you mean by "peaks". Give a small example data set as well as the expected output. –  jbaums Apr 3 '14 at 9:04

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