Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code -

class myClass{
.....
.....
   myClass operator+(myClass& sc)
   {
      *this += sc;
      return *this;
   }
....
}

and this code -

class myClass{
.....
.....
   myClass operator+(myClass& sc)
   {
      myClass mc;
      mc += (*this);
      mc += sc;
      return mc;
   }
....
}

do they produce same result? In other words, they both return new object. The first one implicitly creates new myClass object and returns it and the other one is explicit. Is it my understanding wrong?

share|improve this question
2  
Both are wrong. Member operator+ should be const. The normal version is operator+(MyClass const& rhs) const { MyClass copy(*this); copy += rhs; return copy; } –  MSalters Apr 2 at 14:42
    
@MSalters +1. Only += operator should modify the this object. –  Neil Kirk Apr 2 at 14:44
    
@MSaters : Thanks for pointing that out! –  user3273345 Apr 2 at 14:57
    
To clarify: You couldn't write a+b+c for the either of the definitions given, precisely because they miss const. –  MSalters Apr 2 at 15:08
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Both return new objects, and both return objects with (presumably) identical values, but the first one modifies this, before making a copy.

share|improve this answer
add comment

yes. return value is "myClass". if you want to avoid copy of object: change it on myClass& or myClass* (reference or poiter), but do not return pointer/reference on temporary object..

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.