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In PHP you can do if(isset($array['foo'])) { ... }. In Javascript you often use if(array.foo) { ... } to do the same, but this is not exactly the same statement. The condition will also evaluate to false if array.foo does exists but is null or false (and probably other values as well).

What is the perfect equivalent of PHP's isset in Javascript?

In a broader sense, a general, complete guide on Javascript's handling of variables that don't exist, variables without a value, etc. would be convenient.

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I wrote a function that will test the existence of an objects property no matter depth of query: stackoverflow.com/a/12681101/1268003 Using my code, combined with some knowledge shared by @CMS in this thread, you can easily write a global function that works very much like PHP:s isset. –  Martin Andersson Oct 1 '12 at 22:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 381 down vote accepted

I generally use the typeof operator:

if (typeof obj.foo != 'undefined') {
  // ..
}

It will return "undefined" either if the property doesn't exist or it's value is undefined.

(See also: Difference between undefined and not being defined.)

There are other ways to figure out if a property exists on an object, like the hasOwnProperty method:

if (obj.hasOwnProperty('foo')) {
  //..
}

And the in operator:

if ('foo' in obj) {
  //..
}

The difference between the last two, is that the hasOwnProperty method, will check if the property exist physically on the object (the property is not inherited).

The in operator will check on all the properties reachable up in the prototype chain, e.g.:

var obj = { foo: 'bar'};

obj.hasOwnProperty('foo'); // true
obj.hasOwnProperty('toString'); // false
'toString' in obj; // true

As you can see, hasOwnProperty returns false and the in operator returns true when checking the toString method, this method is defined up in the prototype chain, because obj inherits form Object.prototype.

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9  
Why use typeof rather than if( obj.foo !== undefined ) ? –  Matt Ball Feb 17 '10 at 14:59
2  
Ah. One day I will write a piece of truly cross-browser Javascript. Until then... –  Matt Ball Feb 17 '10 at 15:03
14  
the problem with this is that you get an error when you try to check deeper properties, for example: obj.thisdoesntexist.foo !== undefined. In PHP you can use isset or empty and safely at any deep. –  Enrique Aug 21 '11 at 16:35
2  
IE8 doesn't has "hasOwnPropery" –  max4ever Feb 27 '12 at 14:52
1  
Exactly, PHP allows isset($abc->def->ghi->jkl) without raising an exception and halting the script, unlike JavaScript's typeof operator. You have to use something like try{ abc.def.ghi.jkl; isset=true } catch(e){ isset=false } –  Steven Pribilinskiy May 20 at 10:30

Reference to SOURCE

function isset ()
{
    // http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net
    // +   original by: Kevin van Zonneveld (http://kevin.vanzonneveld.net)
    // +   improved by: FremyCompany
    // +   improved by: Onno Marsman
    // +   improved by: Rafał Kukawski
    // *     example 1: isset( undefined, true);
    // *     returns 1: false
    // *     example 2: isset( 'Kevin van Zonneveld' );
    // *     returns 2: true

  var a = arguments,
    l = a.length,
    i = 0,
    undef;

  if (l === 0)
  {
    throw new Error('Empty isset');
  }

  while (i !== l)
  {
    if (a[i] === undef || a[i] === null)
    {
      return false;
    }
    i++;
  }
  return true;
}
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This will raise an exception when calling isset(abc.def.ghi) in case if abc.def is undefined. However by combining this solution with the one that accepts a variable name in a form of a string, it will be identical to the PHP version. –  Steven Pribilinskiy May 20 at 10:43
if (!('foo' in obj)) {
  // not set.
}
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//
//  tring to reference non-existing variable throws ReferenceError 
//  before test function is even executed
//
//  example, if you do:
//    
//     if ( isset( someVar ) ) 
//        doStuff( someVar );
//   
//  you get a ReferenceError ( if there is no someVar... ) 
//  and isset fn doesn't get executed.
//
//  if you pass variable name as string, ex. isset( 'novar' );, 
//  this might work:
//
function isset ( strVariableName ) { 

    try { 
        eval( strVariableName );
    } catch( err ) { 
        if ( err instanceof ReferenceError ) 
           return false;
    }

    return true;

 } 
//
//
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This simple solution works, but not for deep object check.

function isset(str) {
    return window[str] !== undefined;
}
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Provide the object path as a string, then you can break this string into a path and resolve hasOwnProperty at each step while overwriting the object itself with each iteration.

If you are coding in ES6 environment, take a look at http://stackoverflow.com/a/26990347/368691.

var a;

a = {
    b: {
        c: 'e'
    }
};

function isset (obj, path) {
    var stone;

    path = path || '';

    if (path.indexOf('[') !== -1) {
        throw new Error('Unsupported object path notation.');
    }

    
    path = path.split('.');
    
    do {
        if (obj === undefined) {
            return false;
        }

        stone = path.shift();
        
        if (!obj.hasOwnProperty(stone)) {
            return false;
        }
        
        obj = obj[stone];
        
    } while (path.length);

    return true;
}

console.log(
    isset(a, 'b') == true,
    isset(a, 'b.c') == true,
    isset(a, 'b.c.d') == false,
    isset(a, 'b.c.d.e') == false,
    isset(a, 'b.c.d.e.f') == false
);

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Try this

var result = (str)?str:'hello world';

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