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There is the Zen of Python written by Tim Peters. It is considered like a summary manual of python's philosophy. Here it is:

>>> import this
The Zen of Python, by Tim Peters

Beautiful is better than ugly.
Explicit is better than implicit.
Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated.
Flat is better than nested.
Sparse is better than dense.
Readability counts.
Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.
Although practicality beats purity.
Errors should never pass silently.
Unless explicitly silenced.
In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.
There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.
Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.
Now is better than never.
Although never is often better than *right* now.
If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.
If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.
Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

Can I have an example of each of those items, applied to real python programming?

I think one example per answer would be best, so we could vote on each example.

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closed as not constructive by Tim Post Aug 13 '11 at 18:29

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
This is an awesome question, but it should really be marked as community wiki :) –  Jeremy Cantrell Oct 23 '08 at 14:26
3  
This should be on programmers.stackexchange.com really. –  Milliams Dec 27 '12 at 23:02
2  
I gave a -1. Not because I think it's not a funny topic, but I think it hurts the idea of thinking about this topic in such a direct, logical way. It's Zen, right? –  erikb85 Mar 27 '13 at 23:55
    
Yeah, of course this is not constructive :-P –  Dogweather Sep 17 '13 at 22:06
1  
I ran across this website which I found a great read, perhaps a little out of date though: python.net/~goodger/projects/pycon/2007/idiomatic/handout.html –  Jens Nov 10 '13 at 22:26

19 Answers 19

Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.

A string of length 1 is not special enough to deserve a dedicated char type.

Although practicality beats purity.

That's why we have the chr() and ord() builtins.

share|improve this answer
14  
Not a python guy but i like that first item :) –  RCIX Nov 14 '09 at 1:40
25  
That is funny, because I see things as exactly the opposite. The string is the special case that is breaking the rule. To have a character type would be the rule. A string is, as the very name of the type implies, a sequence of characters one after the other. It is a sequence, an array or a list (as you prefer) of some basic type. For every other situation like that the language has provided a basic type and we build the sequences over the basic type, but for the special case of sequences of characters, the language breaks the rule. Just think: 'a string of length 1'. One what? –  Jeff May 23 '11 at 5:16
22  
the pythonic way to think is that a string is a constant, just like a number, that is why it is an immutable type: "strings in Python are considered as elemental as numbers. no amount of activity will change the value 8 to anything else, and in Python, no amount of activity will change the string 'eight' to anything else." so the string of length 1 is more like a norm on the string, you wouldn't 'normally' think of the number 8.5 as being made up of 8 and a half 1's now would you? –  wim Jun 3 '11 at 4:55
2  
A list of chars... –  RickyA Aug 25 '12 at 23:08
2  
@BeniCherniavsky-Paskin: both 'c' in 'chars' and 'str' in 'string' work on Python 2. Why do you think it should work only in Python 3.2+? –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 13 '13 at 16:55

Beautiful is better than ugly.

Behold, Euler's Algorithm to find the greatest common denominator in 4 lines:

def gcd(x, y):
    while y:
        x, y = y, x % y
    return x

Of course, the mathematical beauty comes from the algorithm, but I love the way Python succeeds at being precise, concise, and explicit at the same time. In fact "elegant" also comes to mind. Of course, any language that can implement qsort in only one more line than C's "Hello World" certainly has a claim on elegance.

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1  
In c hello world is is 4 lines. #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { printf("Hello, world!\n"); return(0); } I would love to see a 5 line quicksort. –  agiliq Jul 3 '09 at 5:19
38  
Here is a Python one line, one statement lambda quicksort: qsort1 = lambda lst : lst if len(lst) <= 1 else qsort1([i for i in lst[1:] if i < lst[0]]) + [lst[0]] + qsort1([i for i in lst[1:] if i >= lst[0]]) –  truppo Sep 15 '09 at 21:41
6  
+1 for while y:. Please quotify the koan. –  systemovich Dec 21 '10 at 23:28
7  
gcd x 0 = x; gcd x y = gcd y (x rem y) -- a little more than one character, but certainly nicer Python –  Neil Mitchell Dec 27 '12 at 20:42
6  
return gcd(b, a % b) if b else a –  wim Mar 21 '13 at 0:52

I've just noticed zen #15 hasn't been covered yet. Well, now is better than never.

never:

f = open('i_will_stay_open_for_ages.txt', 'w')
f.write('every even number > 2 is the sum of two primes')
assert not 'this sentence is false'
f.close()

now:

with open('i_will_be_closed_right_away.txt', 'w') as f:
  f.write('the sum of two primes > 2 is an even number')
  raise AssertionError('this sentence is false')

In the first example, an exception will bump you out of the codeblock before the file can be closed. In the second, python will politely handle this for you with context managers. You could of course fix the first case by using try: and finally: blocks, but beautiful is better than ugly.

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8  
for the record: the first case describes goldbach's conjecture (for integers greater than 2), this problem has remained open for hundreds of years - no proof and no counterexample! the converse statement, in the second case, is something which we can clearly and easily see is true. –  wim Jun 22 '12 at 2:10
2  
The sum of 2 primes is even only if you require primes > 2. –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 16 '13 at 3:23

Explicit is better than implicit.

That's why you should never do anything like this:

from os import *
print getcwd()

Instead, every time you invoke a function you should name its module explicitly:

import os
print os.getcwd()

In case you forget this best practice, let the last koan remind it to you:

Namespaces are one honking great idea - let's do more of those!

Another example: the 'self' parameter in methods. You always have to mention explicitly what object you are working with.

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17  
Why do so many examples start off with the from x import * idiom? It might be fine for production code, but not for people trying to learn your library or framework! –  David Eyk Oct 23 '08 at 19:15
21  
It isn't even fine for production code. I vastly prefer either explicitly importing exactly those names you need, or explicitly naming the module each time. –  Omnifarious Nov 14 '09 at 1:54
18  
Or, if you don't like typing lots of code, import biglonghugename as bname (the main one I use is import Tkinter as tk) –  Wayne Werner Aug 11 '10 at 20:38

There should be one - and preferably only one - obvious way to do it. (The exact contrary of perl's motto - there's more than one way to do it).

How many ways could you provide to "iterate over a sequence" in C++? Iterating over an array with integers or pointers; iterating over STL vectors with various kinds of iterators... etc. If you want to be proficient in C++ (and be able to read other people's code), you must learn them all. In Python you must learn only one:

for element in sequence:

And isn't it obvious?

This is also why they're dropping duplicate modules in Python3000's standard library. There should be one module for every need.

[Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch: OK, Guido van Rossum is Dutch].

share|improve this answer
2  
You've forgotten a while loop. It is almost never used to iterate over a sequence but it can be done with it. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 26 '08 at 21:07
4  
It's not 100% true, u know, somethings can be done with either for loops or list comprehensions or a combination of map/filter (or even a plain old while loop) –  hasenj Dec 27 '08 at 1:57
36  
Yet there are zillion ways to do things in the Python packaging world. –  Sridhar Ratnakumar Aug 8 '09 at 15:43
10  
The item should not be taken too literally. Also it contains the words 'should' and 'obvious'. There will be always multiple ways of doing things, but Python provides only one (or few) for a specific problem. –  Joschua Dec 19 '10 at 0:02
    
Or with recursion. –  Ali Afshar Dec 31 '12 at 6:26

I can give an example of "readability counts" (the easy one :D) Compare C and Python:

 #include <stdio.h>
 int main(void) {
     printf("Hello, world!\n");
     return(0);
 }
print "Hello, world!"

(And what about indentation? Well-indented code is more readable. Thus, in Python it's mandatory)

share|improve this answer
2  
Cool, but I'd like to see python examples instead. –  nosklo Oct 23 '08 at 1:37
10  
Or even worse std::cout << "Hello World" << std:endl; –  Martin Beckett Oct 23 '08 at 1:37
10  
I don't think this is entirely valid, since that code is "readable" c code. A more suitable example would be an unreadable python vs readable python. –  freespace Oct 23 '08 at 1:42
6  
I don't think that the "zen of python" is a list of best practices in python. According to me it's an explanation of why Python is as we know it, why was it designed to be so. Thus, I think comparisons with other languages are useful... –  Federico A. Ramponi Oct 23 '08 at 1:46
10  
@Bob, I disagree -- to someone who knows neither language, the C is less readable. –  Charles Duffy Oct 23 '08 at 1:54

The module this itself is an example of what you don't have to do, it has implicit behaviour, ambiguity, complexity, unreadability... a pure gem :)

import this

dir(this)

this.c
this.d
this.i
this.s

"".join([c in this.d and this.d[c] or c for c in this.s])

help(this)
share|improve this answer
3  
yeah, this is an example how it looks, when not using the Zen of Python! :D –  Joschua Sep 6 '10 at 13:08
6  
"".join(this.d.get(c, c) for c in this.s) –  juliomalegria Sep 16 '12 at 16:25
    
I'm really confused...I tried those statements (this.c,d,i,s) and they gave me strange unknown values. What are they? I tried "help(this)" but it gave no useful information whatsoever. –  Aerovistae Dec 22 '12 at 8:13
2  
@Aerovistae See that "".join([...]) line Jaime quoted? It means "create a string by grabbing every character in this.s (a string containing an encrypted version of the text quoted in the question above) and either using that character directly, or if it is present in dictionary this.d as a key, using that corresponding value. this.c is an exclamation point that isn't really used for anything. –  Zecc Dec 28 '12 at 9:55

Errors should never pass silently.

try:
    import this
except ImportError:
    print 'this is not available'

Unless explicitly silenced.

try:
    v = d[k]
except KeyError:
    v = d[k] = default
share|improve this answer
11  
Of course, you could just use d.setdefault(). ;) –  Benjamin Peterson Dec 24 '08 at 22:24
16  
or collections.defaultdict –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 26 '08 at 21:11
    
'Import this' actually doesn't throw any error, it gives you the zen of python. :P –  Optimus Nov 27 '11 at 16:08
3  
This is a bad use of try/except. If this happens to contain an import error, then your program will print this is not available, which is not the error. Substitute this for your program and you are left with a debugging headache when you typo a module import. ("What the hell? It says "this" is not available when it clearly is! My world is inside out!") –  pwaller Dec 27 '12 at 22:08
3  
@pwaller: That's the point. The top example is an error passing silently, which is what we should never do. –  Matchu Dec 28 '12 at 3:54

I think Hunter Blanks does a better job of this than I could in PEP 20 (The Zen of Python) by example

#!/usr/bin/env python

"""
=====================================
PEP 20 (The Zen of Python) by example
=====================================

Usage: %prog

:Author: Hunter Blanks, hblanks@artifex.org / hblanks@monetate.com
:Date: 2011-02-08 for PhillyPUG/philly.rb, revised 2011-02-10

Sources:

    - http://artifex.org/~hblanks/talks/2011/pep20_by_example.pdf
    - http://artifex.org/~hblanks/talks/2011/pep20_by_example.html
    - http://artifex.org/~hblanks/talks/2011/pep20_by_example.py.txt

Dependencies for PDF output:

    - Pygments 1.4
    - pdflatex & the usual mess of latex packages
"""

from __future__ import with_statement
import sys

################################ preface ###############################

"""
   "In his wisdom and in his Molisan poverty, Officer Ingravallo,
    who seemed to live on silence... , in his wisdom, he sometimes
    interrupted this silence and this sleep to enunciate some
    theoretical idea (a general idea, that is) on the affairs of men,
    and of women. At first sight, or rather, on first hearing, these
    seemed banalities. They weren't banalities. And so, those rapid
    declarations, which crackled on his lips like the sudden
    illumination of a sulphur match, were revived in the ears of people
    at a distance of hours, or of months, from their enunciation: as if
    after a mysterious period of incubation. 'That's right!' the person
    in question admitted, 'That's exactly what Ingravallo said to me.'"

        - Carlo Emilio Gadda, *That Awful Mess on the Via Merulana*
"""

################################# text #################################

"""
The Zen of Python, by Tim Peters

Beautiful is better than ugly.
Explicit is better than implicit.
Simple is better than complex.
Complex is better than complicated.
Flat is better than nested.
Sparse is better than dense.
Readability counts.
Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.
Although practicality beats purity.
Errors should never pass silently.
Unless explicitly silenced.
In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.
There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.
Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.
Now is better than never.
Although never is often better than *right* now.
If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.
If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.
Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!
"""

################################### 1 ##################################

"""
Give me a function that takes a list of numbers and returns only the
even ones, divided by two.
"""

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

halve_evens_only = lambda nums: map(lambda i: i/2, filter(lambda i: not i%2, nums))

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def halve_evens_only(nums):
    return [i/2 for i in nums if not i % 2]

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Beautiful is better than ugly.'

################################## 2 ###################################

"""
Load the cat, dog, and mouse models so we can edit instances of them.
"""

def load():
    from menagerie.cat.models import *
    from menagerie.dog.models import *
    from menagerie.mouse.models import *

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def load():
    from menagerie.models import cat as cat_models
    from menagerie.models import dog as dog_models
    from menagerie.models import mouse as mouse_models

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Explicit is better than implicit.'

################################### 3 ##################################

"""
Can you write out these measurements to disk?
"""

measurements = [
    {'weight': 392.3, 'color': 'purple', 'temperature': 33.4},
    {'weight': 34.0, 'color': 'green', 'temperature': -3.1},
    ]

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def store(measurements):
    import sqlalchemy
    import sqlalchemy.types as sqltypes

    db = sqlalchemy.create_engine('sqlite:///measurements.db')
    db.echo = False
    metadata = sqlalchemy.MetaData(db)
    table = sqlalchemy.Table('measurements', metadata,
        sqlalchemy.Column('id', sqltypes.Integer, primary_key=True),
        sqlalchemy.Column('weight', sqltypes.Float),
        sqlalchemy.Column('temperature', sqltypes.Float),
        sqlalchemy.Column('color', sqltypes.String(32)),
        )
    table.create(checkfirst=True)

    for measurement in measurements:
        i = table.insert()
        i.execute(**measurement)

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def store(measurements):
    import json
    with open('measurements.json', 'w') as f:
        f.write(json.dumps(measurements))

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Simple is better than complex.'

################################### 4 ##################################

"""
Can you write out those same measurements to a MySQL DB? I think we're
gonna have some measurements with multiple colors next week, by the way.
"""

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def store(measurements):
    import sqlalchemy
    import sqlalchemy.types as sqltypes

    db = create_engine(
        'mysql://user:password@localhost/db?charset=utf8&use_unicode=1')
    db.echo = False
    metadata = sqlalchemy.MetaData(db)
    table = sqlalchemy.Table('measurements', metadata,
        sqlalchemy.Column('id', sqltypes.Integer, primary_key=True),
        sqlalchemy.Column('weight', sqltypes.Float),
        sqlalchemy.Column('temperature', sqltypes.Float),
        sqlalchemy.Column('color', sqltypes.String(32)),
        )
    table.create(checkfirst=True)

    for measurement in measurements:
        i = table.insert()
        i.execute(**measurement)

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def store(measurements):
    import MySQLdb
    db = MySQLdb.connect(user='user', passwd="password", host='localhost', db="db")

    c = db.cursor()
    c.execute("""
        CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS measurements
          id int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
          weight float,
          temperature float,
          color varchar(32)
          PRIMARY KEY id
          ENGINE=InnoDB CHARSET=utf8
          """)

    insert_sql = (
        "INSERT INTO measurements (weight, temperature, color) "
        "VALUES (%s, %s, %s)")

    for measurement in measurements:
        c.execute(insert_sql,
            (measurement['weight'], measurement['temperature'], measurement['color'])
            )

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Complex is better than complicated.'

################################### 5 ##################################

"""Identify this animal. """

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def identify(animal):
    if animal.is_vertebrate():
        noise = animal.poke()
        if noise == 'moo':
            return 'cow'
        elif noise == 'woof':
            return 'dog'
    else:
        if animal.is_multicellular():
            return 'Bug!'
        else:
            if animal.is_fungus():
                return 'Yeast'
            else:
                return 'Amoeba'

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def identify(animal):
    if animal.is_vertebrate():
        return identify_vertebrate()
    else:
        return identify_invertebrate()

def identify_vertebrate(animal):
    noise = animal.poke()
    if noise == 'moo':
        return 'cow'
    elif noise == 'woof':
        return 'dog'

def identify_invertebrate(animal):
    if animal.is_multicellular():
        return 'Bug!'
    else:
        if animal.is_fungus():
            return 'Yeast'
        else:
            return 'Amoeba'

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Flat is better than nested.'

################################### 6 ##################################

""" Parse an HTTP response object, yielding back new requests or data. """

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def process(response):
    selector = lxml.cssselect.CSSSelector('#main > div.text')
    lx = lxml.html.fromstring(response.body)
    title = lx.find('./head/title').text
    links = [a.attrib['href'] for a in lx.find('./a') if 'href' in a.attrib]
    for link in links:
        yield Request(url=link)
    divs = selector(lx)
    if divs: yield Item(utils.lx_to_text(divs[0]))

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def process(response):
    lx = lxml.html.fromstring(response.body)

    title = lx.find('./head/title').text

    links = [a.attrib['href'] for a in lx.find('./a') if 'href' in a.attrib]
    for link in links:
        yield Request(url=link)

    selector = lxml.cssselect.CSSSelector('#main > div.text')
    divs = selector(lx)
    if divs:
        bodytext = utils.lx_to_text(divs[0])
        yield Item(bodytext)

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Sparse is better than dense.'

################################### 7 ##################################

""" Write out the tests for a factorial function. """

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def factorial(n):
    """
    Return the factorial of n, an exact integer >= 0.

    >>> [factorial(n) for n in range(6)]
    [1, 1, 2, 6, 24, 120]

    >>> factorial(30)
    265252859812191058636308480000000L

    >>> factorial(-1)
    Traceback (most recent call last):
        ...
    ValueError: n must be >= 0
    """
    pass

if __name__ == '__main__' and '--test' in sys.argv:
    import doctest
    doctest.testmod()

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

import unittest

def factorial(n):
    pass

class FactorialTests(unittest.TestCase):
    def test_ints(self):
        self.assertEqual(
            [factorial(n) for n in range(6)], [1, 1, 2, 6, 24, 120])

    def test_long(self):
        self.assertEqual(
            factorial(30), 265252859812191058636308480000000L)

    def test_negative_error(self):
        with self.assertRaises(ValueError):
            factorial(-1)

if __name__ == '__main__' and '--test' in sys.argv:
    unittest.main()

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Readability counts.'

################################# 8 & 9 ################################

"""
Write a function that returns another functions. Also, test floating point.
"""

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def make_counter():
    i = 0
    def count():
        """ Increments a count and returns it. """
        i += 1
        return i
    return count

count = make_counter()
assert hasattr(count, '__name__') # No anonymous functions!
assert hasattr(count, '__doc__')


assert float('0.20000000000000007') == 1.1 - 0.9 # (this is platform dependent)
assert 0.2 != 1.1 - 0.9 # Not special enough to break the rules of floating pt.
assert float(repr(1.1 - 0.9)) == 1.1 - 0.9

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def make_adder(addend):
    return lambda i: i + addend # But lambdas, once in a while, are practical.

assert str(1.1 - 0.9) == '0.2' # as may be rounding off floating point errors
assert round(0.2, 15) == round(1.1 - 0.9, 15)

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print "Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules."
print 'Although practicality beats purity.'

################################ 10 & 11 ###############################

""" Import whatever json library is available. """

try:
    import json
except ImportError:
    try:
        import simplejson as json
    except:
        print 'Unable to find json module!'
        raise

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'Errors should never pass silently'
print 'Unless explicitly silenced.'

################################## 12 ##################################

""" Store an HTTP request in the database. """

def process(response):
    db.store(url, response.body)

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

def process(response):
    charset = detect_charset(response)
    db.store(url, response.body.decode(charset))

print 'In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.'

################################## 13 ##################################

# Example 1
assert hasattr(__builtins__, 'map') # ('map' in __builtins__) raises TypeError
assert not hasattr(__builtins__, 'collect')

# Example 2
def fibonacci_generator():
    prior, current = 0, 1
    while current < 100:
        yield prior + current
        prior, current = current, current + prior

sequences = [
    range(20),
    {'foo': 1, 'fie': 2},
    fibonacci_generator(),
    (5, 3, 3)
    ]

for sequence in sequences:
    for item in sequence: # all sequences iterate the same way
        pass

#-----------------------------------------------------------------------

print 'There should be one, and preferably only one way to do it.'
print "Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch."

################################## 14 ##################################

def obsolete_func():
    raise PendingDeprecationWarning

def deprecated_func():
    raise DeprecationWarning

print 'Now is better than never'
print 'Although never is often better than *right* now.'

################################## 15 ##################################

def hard():

    # Example 1
    try:
        import twisted
        help(twisted) # (this may not be as hard as I think, though)
    except:
        pass

    # Example 2
    import xml.dom.minidom
    document = xml.dom.minidom.parseString(
        '''<menagerie><cat>Fluffers</cat><cat>Cisco</cat></menagerie>''')
    menagerie = document.childNodes[0]
    for node in menagerie.childNodes:
        if node.childNodes[0].nodeValue== 'Cisco' and node.tagName == 'cat':
            return node


def easy(maybe):

    # Example 1
    try:
        import gevent
        help(gevent)
    except:
        pass

    # Example 2
    import lxml
    menagerie = lxml.etree.fromstring(
        '''<menagerie><cat>Fluffers</cat><cat>Cisco</cat></menagerie>''')
    for pet in menagerie.find('./cat'):
        if pet.text == 'Cisco':
            return pet

print "If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea."
print 'If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.'

################################## 16 ##################################

def chase():
    import menagerie.models.cat as cat
    import menagerie.models.dog as dog

    dog.chase(cat)
    cat.chase(mouse)

print "Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!"

############################### Readings ###############################

"""
    - Peters, Tim. PEP 20, "The Zen of Python".

    - Raymond, Eric. *The Art of Unix Programming*.
      (http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/taoup/)

    - Alchin, Marty. *Pro Python*.

    - Ramblings on 
      http://stackoverflow.com/questions/228181/the-zen-of-python

"""

############################## main block ##############################

from optparse import OptionParser

import os
import re
import subprocess
import sys

parser = OptionParser(usage=__doc__.strip())
parser.add_option('-v', dest='verbose', action='store_true',
    help='Verbose output')

header_pat = re.compile(r'^\\PY\{c\}\{' + (r'\\PYZsh\{\}' * 8))

def yield_altered_lines(latex):
    """
    Adds page breaks and page layout to our pygments file. Blah.
    """
    for line in latex.splitlines():
        if line == r'\documentclass{article}':
            yield line
            yield r'\usepackage{geometry}'
            yield r'\geometry{letterpaper,landscape,margin=0.25in}'
        elif line == r'\begin{document}':
            yield line
            yield r'\large'
        elif header_pat.search(line):
            yield r'\end{Verbatim}'
            yield r'\pagebreak'
            yield r'\begin{Verbatim}[commandchars=\\\{\}]'
            yield line
        else:
            yield line

if __name__ == '__main__':
    print
    options, args = parser.parse_args()
    if options.verbose:
        errout = sys.stderr
    else:
        errout = open('/tmp/pep20.log', 'w')

    try:
        # TODO: pygmentize in Python instead of farming it out
        p = subprocess.Popen(
            ('pygmentize', '-f', 'latex', '-l', 'python',
                '-O', 'full', sys.argv[0]),
            stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=errout)
        output, err = p.communicate()
        assert p.returncode == 0, 'pygmentize exited with %d' % p.returncode

        p2 = subprocess.Popen(
            ('pygmentize', '-f', 'html', '-l', 'python',
                '-O', 'full', '-o', 'pep20_by_example.html', sys.argv[0]),
            stdout=errout, stderr=errout)
        p2.communicate()
        assert p2.returncode == 0, 'pygmentize exited with %d' % p2.returncode

    except OSError, e:
        print >> sys.stderr, 'Failed to run pygmentize: %s' % str(e)
    except AssertionError, e:
        print e

    altered_output = '\n'.join(l for l in yield_altered_lines(output))

    try:
        p = subprocess.Popen(('pdflatex',),
            stdin=subprocess.PIPE, stdout=errout, stderr=errout)
        p.communicate(altered_output)
        assert p.returncode == 0, 'pdflatex exited with %d' % p.returncode
    except OSError, e:
        print >> sys.stderr, 'Failed to run pygmentize: %s' % str(e)
    except AssertionError, e:
        print e

    os.rename('texput.pdf', 'pep20_by_example.pdf')

    errout.close()
share|improve this answer
    
Please prefer inline content over link-only answers. This currently does not stand as an answer with the today's rules. –  Final Contest Feb 21 at 5:06
1  
@LaszloPapp this answer is posted almost 3 years back and at that time "link only answers are not allowed" rule wasn't exist. –  Paresh Mayani Feb 21 at 9:44
    
@PareshMayani: I do not understand what point you are trying to make. We do not live in the past, but present. It means that, posts not confirming the current policies have to modified, or go - especially when there are (only) better answers. This is also what I was writing. –  Final Contest Feb 21 at 9:46
    
@LaszloPapp yeah agree but we should keep this answer LIVE especially as its been voted high and must have found useful! And in addition, it's community wiki post. –  Paresh Mayani Feb 21 at 9:47
    
@PareshMayani: Posts with hundreds of upvotes go deleted... This is neither that highly upvoted, nor is it as nearly useful as many other answers around, but more importantly: this post encourages policies not supported by the site. So, it has to be modified or go. There is no way around to it. In my understanding, it really does not matter whether it is CW, a post from Jon Skeet or Chuck Norris. –  Final Contest Feb 21 at 9:52

Sparse is better than dense

if i>0: return sqrt(i)
elif i==0: return 0
else: return 1j * sqrt(-i)

versus

if i > 0:
    return sqrt(i)
elif i == 0:
    return 0
else:
    return 1j * sqrt(-i)

To rephrase the dictum another way, "Don't try to stick too much code on one line."

Quoting (with added sparseness) python-list.

share|improve this answer
    
For the record, cmath.sqrt(i) (always complex) or just i**0.5 (float/complex as needed, but slightly imprecise). ideone.com/i72gYb –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Jan 16 '13 at 4:04

Although the poem predates this, here's my take on

Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.

The classic trinary if-then-else operator (it's cond?expr1:expr2 in C) was debated hotly. Guido came up with this

a = expr1 if cond else expr2

This is the one way to do this, and it isn't obvious at first. One of the sidebars for this is always the observation that the condition is evaluated first irrespective of the left-to-right order of the operands.

There's actually a precedent for this in some work (I think) by Hoare or Wirth on algebraic analysis of algorithms. Their article pitched this simplified if structure so you could just write the decisions out as a simple expression with an obvious effect.

share|improve this answer
3  
The "cond and expr1 or expr2" -- while provably the same -- is deprecated because it's hard to manage the operator priority issues when the condition is non-trivial. You either have to parenthesize everything or do a lot of thinking. :-( –  S.Lott Oct 24 '08 at 23:36
9  
Also, there may be issues if expr1 can be false :| –  Federico A. Ramponi Oct 26 '08 at 20:24
10  
cond and expr1 or expr2 is not the same as expr1 if cond else expr2. Counterexample cond and False or __import__('os').system('rm -r /'). corrected example is: (cond and (False,) or (__import__('os').system('rm -r /'),))[0]. If you like that better than the if/else expression, I'm afraid I can't help you. –  IfLoop Apr 2 '11 at 1:36
5  
Where is the Dutchness in here? –  RickyA Aug 25 '12 at 23:18
1  
@RickyA the Dutchness is a joke. Guido is Dutch. –  Jonathan Sternberg Jan 2 '13 at 23:08

One more: "Flat is better than nested."

I think this is the Pythonic style of piling a bunch of class definitions and singleton object creations into a single module file.

In other languages (particularly C++ or Java where the expectation is one class per file) there would be a whole directory full of files. With Python, it's a single file and that's that. Much of the library follows this "Flat is better than nested" style.

Also, the definitions of the built-in types looks relatively flat. Compare it with the Java collection classes or the C++ STL; both have considerable depth to the class inheritance, making it harder to comprehend.

share|improve this answer
6  
I always thought that one is meant more as a way to discourage deep nesting in code (if/for/while, or even function creation). For example Javascript for browser, callback function within another within another and you have lines starting at character number 97. –  grizwako Sep 13 '13 at 7:40

Beautiful is better than ugly

Logical operators - Use of and, or instead of &&, || respectively. Though it is subjective, code seems more readable and beautiful this way.

if (is_valid(a) && b == 0 || s == 'yes') {

if is_valid(a) and b == 0 or s == 'yes':

It goes well with Don't make me think philosophy.

share|improve this answer
2  
if variable is not None: vs if (variable != null) { –  Alex L Feb 11 '13 at 5:00
2  
Usually, it's if not variable: which is even nicer :) –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jan 6 at 21:18
    
But then, even better would be if variable is Some: –  rwst Mar 9 at 8:21

I'll try to tackle

Errors should never pass silently. Unless explicitly silenced.

This could be a reference to the warnings module and the -W option on the command line.

Default -- show once.

>>> import warnings
>>> warnings.warn( "Not good" )
__main__:1: UserWarning: Not good
>>> warnings.warn( "Not good" )
>>>

Here's a programmatic explicit silencing.

>>> warnings.simplefilter("ignore",Warning)
>>> warnings.warn( "Not good" )
>>>

You can also use the -W command-line option to silence warnings. For example -Wi will ignore all warnings.

Nothing is simpler than just including warnings wherever you think they might be helpful for troubleshooting, knowing that warning management and logging is already written.

share|improve this answer
2  
Man. I didn't even know about the warnings module. Good stuff. –  crystalattice Oct 23 '08 at 2:59
3  
Could be a reference to exceptions, and things like not doing try: ...; except: pass –  dbr Oct 10 '09 at 22:53

In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess

Consider:

if not a and b:
   assert not a
   assert b

What binds more tightly 'not' or 'and'? The syntax is unambiguous but my memory is not.

Could it be? (no):

if not (a and b):
   pass

If short-circuiting doesn't matter then I'd write it:

if b and not a:
   pass

Or somewhat ugly but reliable if it does:

if (not a) and b:
   pass

This is subjective because someone may argue that you should expect the reader of your code to know Python and thus the priorities for 'not' and 'and', and it is not obscure enough to justify parentheses.

share|improve this answer

Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

When you import modules, like

# import everything from a module
import module
# call some function in the module
module.spam()

# import some class from module
import module
breakfast = module.SpamAndEggs()

they are not added to the global namespace. Unless you write:

from module import *

Which you should never do, except maybe for convenience when testing things in the command prompt. Imported modules get their own namespace, which you refer to with the module name like in the first example above. This is good because there is less risk of name conflicts.

If you have some module or class with a long name, import them with aliasing:

# long module name
import aRidiculouslyLongModuleName as short
# long class name
from aRidiculouslyLongModuleName import RatherLongClassName as ShortClass
share|improve this answer

Here's another example of

Explicit is better than implicit.

, applied to the language itself.

While Python is dynamically-typed, it is also strongly-typed. Several scripting languages allow things like this:

<?php
$foo = "5";
echo $foo * 3;
?>

[$]> php test.php 
15%

(The % is a result of me not adding a newline to the end of the echo statement.)

This is known as type coercion. You'll also see it used frequently in C, where programmers often take advantage of the compiler's lack of caring to put bits in places they don't belong (as viewed by someone like me :) ).

Now, in Python, multiplying a string by an integer will print the string that many times:

>>> foo = "5"
>>> foo * 3
'555'

because Guido decided to override that particular operator. Adding them, however,

>>> foo+3
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<input>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects

produces an exception. If you really want to do so, then you need to tell Python that, dammit, you want an integer.

>>> int(foo)+3
8
share|improve this answer
    
But then, the interpreter could check if foo contains a number and, if so, add it. Dart anyone? –  rwst Mar 9 at 8:27

Take a look at 99 Bottles of Beer. It has multiple examples of different programming languages printing the "99 bottles of beer" song.

I'm actually using several examples in the Python book I'm writing to showcase why Python is a great language to learn. The simplicity and elegance of Python is a stark contrast to the convoluted code some people have created, and that's not counting the deliberate obfuscated code.

share|improve this answer
    
Look at that. I got downvoted. –  crystalattice Oct 23 '08 at 7:21
1  
maybe self fulfilling prophecy! I was about to downvote this just because you said "this will probably be downvoted" –  hasenj Dec 27 '08 at 2:12
12  
Or maybe it got downvoted because it doesn't answer the question. ;) –  Xiong Chiamiov Aug 4 '10 at 21:02

Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch

...or ','.join(nationalities.pop('Dutch')). inferred from:

Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules

share|improve this answer

protected by wim May 8 '13 at 1:42

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