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I have a file like the one shown below, I want to keep the combinations between the first and second field which has the highest value on the third field(the ones with the arrows, arrows are not included in the actual file) .

1   1   10
1   1   12        <- 
1   2   6         <-
1   3   4         <- 
2   4   32
2   4   37
2   4   39
2   4   40        <- 
2   45  12
2   45  15        <- 
3   3   12
3   3   15
3   3   17
3   3   19        <- 
3   15  4
3   15  9         <- 
4   17  25
4   17  28
4   17  32
4   17  36        <- 
4   18  4         <- 

in order to have and output like this:

1   1   12
1   2   6
1   3   4
2   4   40
2   45  15
3   3   19
3   15  9
4   17  36
4   18  4

And I thought maybe I just play with the sort and uniq command, but I made a mess.

Any ideas?

Very important note: the entries are not neatly sorted from the beginning, I just used sort -k1,1 -k2,2 -k3,3

Thanks in advance guys

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1  
sort -r -k1 -k2 -k3 x.txt | awk '{if($i!=l1 && $2!=l2)print $0; l1=$1; l2=$2;}' –  Jerry Jeremiah Apr 2 '14 at 20:42
    
Pretty clever Jerry, and I added some stuff because of the sort, I had to specify thet the sort is by number values and it ended like this: sort -r -nk1,1 -nk2,2 -nk3,3 | awk '{if($i!=l1 && $2!=l2)print $0; l1=$1; l2=$2;}' please post your solution in order to give you a green check. –  Tamalero Apr 2 '14 at 20:50
1  
Give the check to one of the other answers. The reason I didn't post it as an answer is because it relied on code and it was clear from your comment about sort and uniq that a real answer would be done with just standard commands. The reason I posted it as a comment was just in case no one else supplied an answer so that you would have something that worked. –  Jerry Jeremiah Apr 2 '14 at 20:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a bit funny, but:

sort -nr myfile.txt | rev | uniq -f1 | rev | sort -n

Output:

1   1   12
1   2   6 
1   3   4 
2   4   40
2   45  15
3   15  9 
3   3   19
4   17  36
4   18  4 

How it works:

  • Sort reverse numerically, putting the highest values at the top (so they are saved)
  • Reverse each line, so the last field is first (needed for uniq)
  • Save only the first uniq line, but ignoring the first field (was the last field)
  • Reverse the line back to original order
  • Sort the lines from low to high again

Probably not the most efficient in the world, but at least each step makes some sense.

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I like this answer best! IT does exactly what he wanted: uses sort and uniq –  Jerry Jeremiah Apr 2 '14 at 20:54
    
Thanks JJ. I liked your approach in the comment, but couldn't actually get it to work. –  beroe Apr 2 '14 at 20:56
    
just curious: why did you have problems with my idea? (it worked for me when I tried it) –  Jerry Jeremiah Apr 3 '14 at 3:07

Two passes of sort should do it, for example in bash shell

sort -k1,1n -k2,2n -k3,3nr -t$'\t'  file  | sort -k1,1n -k2,2n -t$'\t' -u -s
1       1       12
1       2       6
1       3       4
2       4       40
2       45      15
3       3       19
3       15      9
4       17      36
4       18      4
share|improve this answer
    
Could work, but OP wants unique combos of the first two, not just the first item... At least for me, this gave 1 1, then 2 4 skipping 1 2 ?? –  beroe Apr 2 '14 at 20:54
    
@beroe, perhaps you have space delimiters and not tab? The command above needs tab-delimited input. As you can see from the output I have pasted in, it matches what the OP is looking for. I am using GNU sort on linux –  1_CR Apr 2 '14 at 21:02
    
OK. I had spaces delimiting original file. Works if I put tabs. Clever. –  beroe Apr 2 '14 at 21:02

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