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In my code, I have a line that says something like

print("Some string:", end=" ")

When I try to run pytest, I get the following:

ryansmacbook:scripts ryan$ py.test file.py
============================= test session starts ==============================
platform darwin -- Python 2.7.5 -- py-1.4.20 -- pytest-2.5.2
collected 0 items / 1 errors 

==================================== ERRORS ====================================
________________________ ERROR collecting cpp-allman.py ________________________
/Library/Python/2.7/site-packages/pytest-2.5.2-py2.7.egg/_pytest/python.py:451: in _importtestmodule
>           mod = self.fspath.pyimport(ensuresyspath=True)
/Library/Python/2.7/site-packages/py-1.4.20-py2.7.egg/py/_path/local.py:620: in pyimport
>           __import__(modname)
E             File "/Users/ryan/path/to/file.py", line 65
E               "Some string:", end=" ")
E                                     ^
E           SyntaxError: invalid syntax
=========================== 1 error in 0.07 seconds ============================

When I comment out the print statement, testing takes forever. I'm trying to test regexes (Testing regexes in Python using py.test), but this is what happens:

ryansmacbook:scripts ryan$ py.test file.py
============================= test session starts ==============================
platform darwin -- Python 2.7.5 -- py-1.4.20 -- pytest-2.5.2
collecting 0 items^C    
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! KeyboardInterrupt !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
/Users/ryan/magzor/scripts/file.py:134: KeyboardInterrupt
=============================  in 2397.55 seconds ==============================

Before I implemented that possible solution, testing took between 30 and 60 seconds, which still seems too long. What's going on?

========================================

Edit: I commented out a part of my code that read from one file and wrote to another but was not contained within a test_ prefixed function. Pytest now runs in about 0.03 seconds. Why is that? I thought tests were independent of program function.

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Do you have any from __future__ imports? You seem to be using a python 2.7 environment –  Tim Castelijns Apr 2 '14 at 21:18
    
No, the shebang says #!/usr/local/bin/python3. I'm unsure of how to tell pytest that I'm using Python3, at which point that SyntaxError will hopefully disappear. –  Ryan M Apr 2 '14 at 21:26
    
You said you "I commented out a part of my code that read from one file and wrote to another"... was that code inside a function or was in the global namespace? Remember that in Python statements in the global namespace are executed at import time. –  Bruno Oliveira Apr 3 '14 at 2:45
    
I moved the aforementioned code into a function main() and added an if __name__ == "__main__" statement, and that fixed the problem. Thanks! Do all my test functions have to be at the global level? –  Ryan M Apr 3 '14 at 4:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to have py.test installed in a python3 environment. A #! line with python3 will only be picked up if the script is run by the OS directly (i.e. ./file.py).

To be sure you're invoking the correct version of py.test you could invoke it as python3 -m pytest. Note the second line of py.test's output when running tests where it shows exactly which version of python is being used (2.7.5 in your case).

The speed issue is probably a separate question hard to answer without seeing the code involved. Somehow the commented out code must have been triggered before. This would be a mistake most likely at import time as py.test does not randomly start to run code.

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Reinstalling pytest using python3 setup.py build/install fixed my issue with the print statement. Thanks! For some reason, it wasn't clear to me that when installed through 2.7.5, it wouldn't detect the right version of Python somewhere on my system. –  Ryan M Apr 3 '14 at 4:11

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