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I have a class named book in C#. In an ASPX page (which has access to book class), I have an iframe element. I want to use Javascript from the page in the iframe, to call book.write(), but I'm not sure if I can call a C# method from a page inside an iframe using Javascript.

How I can do that?

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1  
What framework are you using? ASP.NET Webforms? ASP.NET MVC? –  George Stocker Apr 3 '14 at 0:32
    
possible duplicate of Call ASP.NET Function From Javascript? –  kiprainey Apr 3 '14 at 0:41
    
@GeorgeStocker the OP said "In aspx page I have iframe." - ASPX :D –  nathan742 Apr 3 '14 at 0:48
    
@nathan742 MVC has aspx pages too if you're using the WebformsViewEngine (not to be confused with ASP.NET Webforms). –  George Stocker Apr 3 '14 at 0:49
    
@GeorgeStocker I think what is better is: Razor or ASP.NET Web? –  nathan742 Apr 3 '14 at 0:51

4 Answers 4

You will have to make postback using javascript to the server with some parameters and then the server side can access the required class and function as per the parameter.

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c# = server side, JavaScript = client side. You cannot directly interact with one from the other.

The best you can do is to have some sort of postback, (through a button click, or other method) which would then call the method in your book class.

To execute JavaScript code from c#, you need to write a JavaScript call in your rendered page, from a post back.

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Try AJAX,in your aspx.cs file,add this

 [WebMethod]
public static string CallCSharpCode(){
    new book().write();
}

use AJAX call the method,

 $.ajax({
    type : "POST",
    contentType : "application/json; charset=utf-8",
    url : "your aspx page.aspx/CallCSharpCode",
    dataType : "json",
    success : function (data) {
        var obj = data.d;
        //your code
    },
    error : function (result) {
        //your code
    }
 });
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There's no way you can access C# class by using JavaScript - NEVER you can do it. All you can do is to use <% ... %> and then call your class method through that.

Here's an example:

Your class has method LIKE this (note that you must declare the method as public to access it on your page):

public String Hello()
{
    return "Hello!";
}

And then you want to diplay it in your ASPX page by this:

<body>
    <form id="form1" runat="server">
        <input type="button" value="Test" onclick="alert('<%= Hello() %>')" />
    </form>
</body>
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1  
This isn't doing what you think it is. The call to Hello() is made as the page is rendered by the server, and isn't called by the JavaScript onload event. To show this, take a look at the source for your rendered page, and you will see that your onload function just looks like: alert('Hello!');, and doesn't contain the inline server calls. –  AaronS Apr 3 '14 at 13:33
    
I have said in my answer as 'like this'. Anyway, I have updated my answer. –  nathan742 Apr 4 '14 at 2:18
1  
That's not the issue though. Your call to <%=Hello() %> is made as the page is rendered on the server, and not from any interaction on the client. Again, look at the rendered HTML before you click the button. It will actually look like: onclick="alert('Hello!')", and does not interact with the c# class at all. Try putting a break point in your c# class, and then see when you actually hit it. –  AaronS Apr 4 '14 at 15:16
    
Try it yourself first. I have tried that code and it works –  nathan742 Apr 7 '14 at 1:29
    
Besides, the OP does not indicate when to call the class method he needs, basically, one would just need a return from a C# method in this case (i.e. JSON), so I made a suggestion like this, note SUGGESTION. Additionally, I have said in the beggining of my answer similar to your answer –  nathan742 Apr 7 '14 at 1:39

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