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Is it possible to set FTP passive or active mode when working with URLConnection class? I cannot find any documentation on this, yet this is such a basic functionality that it's hard to believe it is not implemented.

If it's not, what other options do I have in standard Java?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

To get FTP full fledged to work, you'll really need to fall back to low-level programming with Sockets. The URLConnection and consorts simply doesn't suit your needs (no support to enter into passive mode). Fortunately Apache Commons has already done a lot of work for you in flavor of Apache Commons Net FTPClient. To achieve what you need, just use FTPClient#enterLocalPassiveMode() or FTPClient#enterLocalActiveMode()

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This answer might be old? There exists sun.net.ftp.FtpClient#openPassiveDataConnection() (used by sun.net.www.protocol.ftp.FtpURLConnection which is the default handler for ftp://-schemed-URI's in java.net.URLConnection.openConnection(). That seems to facilitate the use of PASV, though not the explicit setting of it. –  David Bullock Jan 9 '13 at 13:29
    
@DavidBullock using "sun.net" packages makes your code vendor dependent. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 8 at 15:57
    
@Thor my point was more that if all you are wanting to do is get the data at an 'ftp://' URL, then Sun/Oracle JVM's may already suffice if you just need casual 'do the best you can' behaviour. But yes, it is not documented, and therefore you if you must guarantee that your app can get a PASV/EPSV connection when required, then you'll need BalusC's fine answer (except his 'no support to enter into passive mode' is a bit too strong as of at least JDK6 and someone with 400K+ rep ought not be so carefree ;-P ). –  David Bullock Jul 13 at 22:18
    
@DavidBullock If you can guarantee that you will never, ever run on anything else than official Oracle JVM's (i.e IBM Java or Google Application Engine) and you are willing to update your code if Oracle choose to refactor their code base in a new Java release and all the other reasons Oracle is saying this is a very dumb thing to do then using unofficial undocumented internal classes is fine. As a quick and very dirty hack in an emergency it would do too (but with a proper fix scheduled in the pipeline). The "no support" is naturally a "There is no official API" for it. Just do it right –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 13 at 22:44
    
@Thor 'Right' is relative to the goals of the program you're writing. Think about the design goals of URLConnection.openConnection() - it's there to take a URL and give you an InputStream. One might justly consider any implementation claiming to support an ftp:// URL to be broken if it did not deal with PASV when getting the stream. Yes, you're not going to rely on this when writing an FTP client. But it may be good enough if you're writing an app that parses the content of any URL the user happens to throw at it, on a best-effort basis. It's useful to know that Sun did think of it. –  David Bullock Jul 14 at 1:44

Today, we capture TCP/IP packet and confirm that the Android/JAVA/URLConnection still use PORT(Active mode) for FTP.

If the server don't support active mode or the network don't support active mode, the URLConnection will failed.

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