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I am reading the source code of SGI standard template library. I find that the operator new function always has a double-colon in front of it. Like this:

T* tmp = (T*)(::operator new((size_t)(size * sizeof(T))));

operator new can be directly called without adding the :: field, then why do the stl coders write it in this way? What trap or situation may it come to if we don't use the :: in front of them.

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No one worked on that code for over a decade... its not really a good read. –  PlasmaHH Apr 3 '14 at 10:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can overload operator new for a class and prefixing it with "::" will call the global "default" operator new instead of a possible overload. For example:

#include <iostream>

class Foo
{
public:
  Foo() { std::cout << "Foo::Foo()" << std::endl; }

  void * operator new(size_t )
  { 
    std::cout << "Foo::operator new()" << std::endl; 
    return static_cast<Foo *>(malloc(sizeof(Foo)));
  }
};


int main()
{
  Foo foo;
  std::cout << "----------------------" << std::endl;
  Foo * p = new Foo;
  std::cout << "----------------------" << std::endl;
  Foo * q = ::new Foo;
}

will print

Foo::Foo()
----------------------
Foo::operator new()
Foo::Foo()
----------------------
Foo::Foo()

Edit: The code snipped is indeed not about operator new that is defined in a class scope. A better example would be this:

#include <iostream>

namespace quux {

void * operator new(size_t s)
{
  std::cout << "quux::operator new" << std::endl;
  return malloc(s);
}

void foo()
{
  std::cout << "quux::foo()" << std::endl;
  int * p = static_cast<int*>(operator new(sizeof(int)));
}

void bar()
{
  std::cout << "quux::bar()" << std::endl;
  int * p = static_cast<int*>(::operator new(sizeof(int)));
}

} // namespace quux


int main()
{
  quux::foo();
  quux::bar();
}

which prints

quux::foo()
quux::operator new
quux::bar()
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-1: It's not what is used in the code. The code shown is calling the raw memory allocator, not an object allocator. –  6502 Apr 3 '14 at 6:54

::operator new in C++ is the global memory allocator that is called every time a certain amount of bytes is needed for a single object. Note that the return value is a void * and that ::operator new(size_t) deals with raw bytes, not objects.

It is basically the C++ counterpart of malloc with simply a funny name.

A separate global allocator ::operator new[](size_t sz) is instead used to allocate memory for arrays of objects.

These two operators, their counterparts ::operator delete and ::operator delete[] and also the nothrow version of the allocators are used for all memory needs of the C++ runtime.

They may be implemented in terms of calls to malloc/free or not. What is guaranteed is that malloc and free dont use them (thus you can call malloc and free if you want to reimplement these functions without the risk of infinite recursion).

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True, but that doesn't explain why the :: is there, which is the core of the question. –  Angew Apr 3 '14 at 7:00
    
@AngeW: ::operator new is the name of the global allocator. Think to :: as "global" and read it as "global operator new". Note that ::operator new (size_t) (what is used in the shown code) has nothing to do with class custom allocators that other answers are talking about. –  6502 Apr 3 '14 at 8:40
1  
I know what a leading :: means. Nevertheless, you could just as well refer to that function just as operator new. That's why I think your answer should explain why the :: is there. –  Angew Apr 3 '14 at 8:43

To call the operator new from the global namespace, in case the user (or someone) else decided to have a new operator.

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Double-colon is used to prevent T::operator new() to be called (if defined).

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No: ::operator new (size_t) is a raw memory allocator and has nothing to do with custom class allocators (except a similarity in the name). –  6502 Apr 3 '14 at 8:42

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