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In Angular everything seems to have a steep learning curve and unit testing an Angular app definitely doesn't escape this paradigm.

When I started with TDD and Angular I felt that I was spending twice (maybe more) as much time figuring out just how to test and maybe even more just getting my tests set up correctly. But as Ben Nadel put it in his blog there are ups and downs in the angular learning process. His graph is definitely my experience with Angular.

However as I have progressed in learning Angular and unit testing as well, now i feel that I am spending much less time setting up tests and much more time making tests go from red to green - which is a good feeling.

So I have come across different methods of setting up my unit test to mock services and promises and I thought I would share what I have learned and also ask the question of:

Are there any other or better ways of accomplishing this?

So onto the code, that what we all come for here anyways - not to listen to some guy talk about his love, err accomplishments learning a framework.

This is how I started out mocking my services and promises, I'll use a controller, but services and promises can be mocked in other places obviously.

describe('Controller: Products', function () {
    var//iable declarations
        $scope,
        $rootScope,
        ProductsMock = {
            getProducts: function () {
            } // There might be other methods as well but I'll stick to one for the sake of consiseness
        },
        PRODUCTS = [{},{},{}]
    ;

    beforeEach(function () {
        module('App.Controllers.Products');
    });

    beforeEach(inject(function ($controller, _$rootScope_) {
        //Set up our mocked promise
        var promise = { then: jasmine.createSpy() };

        //Set up our scope
        $rootScope = _$rootScope_;
        $scope = $rootScope.$new();

        //Set up our spies
        spyOn(ProductsMock, 'getProducts').andReturn(promise);

        //Initialize the controller
        $controller('ProductsController', {
            $scope: $scope,
            Products: ProductsMock
        });

        //Resolve the promise
        promise.then.mostRecentCall.args[0](PRODUCTS);

    }));

    describe('Some Functionality', function () {
        it('should do some stuff', function () {
            expect('Stuff to happen');
        });
    });
});

For us this worked, but as time went on I thought there must be a better way. For one I hated the

promise.then.mostRecentCall 

thing, and if we wanted to reinitialise the controller then we had to pull it out of the beforeEach block and inject it individually into each test.

There has to be a better way...

Now I ask does anyone have other ways to set tests up, or and thoughts or feeling on the way I have chose to do it?

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2 Answers 2

The main point in your own answer about using $q.defer sounds good. My only additions would be that

setupController(0, true)

is not particularly clear, due to the parameters 0 and true, and then the if statement that uses this. Also, passing the mock of products into the $controller function itself seems unusual, and means you might have 2 different products services available. One directly injected into the controller, and one injected by the usual Angular DI system into other services. I think better to use $provide to inject mocks and then everywhere in Angular will have the same instance for any test.

Putting this all together, something like the following seems better, which can be seen at http://plnkr.co/edit/p676TYnAIb9QlD7MPIHu?p=preview

describe('Controller: ProductsController', function() {

  var PRODUCTS, productsMock,  $rootScope, $controller, $q;

  beforeEach(module('plunker'));

  beforeEach(module(function($provide){
    PRODUCTS = [{},{},{}]; 
    productsMock = {};        
    $provide.value('products', productsMock);
  }));

  beforeEach(inject(function (_$controller_, _$rootScope_, _$q_, _products_) {
    $rootScope = _$rootScope_;
    $q = _$q_;
    $controller = _$controller_;
    products = _products_;
  }));

  var createController = function() {
    return $controller('ProductsController', {
      $scope: $rootScope
    })
  };

  describe('on init', function() {
    var getProductsDeferred;

    var resolve = function(results) {
      getProductsDeferred.resolve(results);
      $rootScope.$apply();
    }

    var reject = function(reason) {
      getProductsDeferred.reject(reason);
      $rootScope.$apply();
    }

    beforeEach(function() {
      getProductsDeferred = $q.defer();
      productsMock.getProducts = function() {
        return getProductsDeferred.promise;
      };
      createController();
    });

    it('should set success to be true if resolved with product', function() {
      resolve(PRODUCTS[0]);
      expect($rootScope.success).toBe(true);
    });

    it('should set success to be false if rejected', function() {
      reject();
      expect($rootScope.success).toBe(false);
    });
  });
});

Notice that lack of if statement, and the limitation of the getProductsDeferred object, and getProducts mock, to the scope of a describe block. Using this sort of pattern, means you can add other tests, on other methods of products, without polluting the mock products object, or the setupController function you have, with all the possible methods / combinations you need for the tests.

As a sidebar, I notice:

module('App.Controllers.Products');
module('App.Services.Products');

means you are separating your controllers and services into different Angular modules. I know certain blogs have recommended this, but I suspect this overcomplicated things, and a single module per app is ok. If you then refactor, and make services and directives completely separate reusable components, then it would be time to put them into a separate module, and use them as you would any other 3rd party module.

Edit: Corrected $provide.provide to $provide.value, and fixed some of the ordering of instantiation of controller/services, and added a link to Plunkr

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Michal for taking the time to have a look. However I think you might have missed the complete picture of implementation. I am not passing in 2 products services. One is a global variable so we can pass it around - products, and the other PRODUCTS is the actual products that are returned from the promise. Finally the 3rd use of the word product is a parameter in the setupController fct, this just determines which product I would like to return and the boolean determines if the promise was reject or resolved - need to test both instances. I will rename some vars and add some more comments –  Sten Muchow Apr 10 at 5:09
    
We need the separate modules as for unit testing this is ideal - if you dont understand why i can go further into detail. But boils down to not needing functionality of other modules in the unit test of unrelated modules. And yes we are making modules separate reusable components. –  Sten Muchow Apr 10 at 5:20
    
I like the implementation of resolve and reject, but what if i need to test the controller with a different setup - with your method I am tied to one controller setup. However with a function setupController i can choose exactly how I would like the controller to be setup and it makes the code much more concise. –  Sten Muchow Apr 10 at 5:24
    
I understand that you're not passing in 2 services, but just wanted to say that it's more usual (from what I know) to use $provide to inject mocks of services during tests. I've renamed a variable to be PRODUCTS[0] to be more consistent with your names. I realise that my code wouldn't quite have worked as you wanted, and fixed in answer and at bit.ly/OIPZoQ. I now agree you still need a createController function, and I have edited my answer to include one: but the important point it does nothing but create a controller: all definitions of stub methods are separate, and in a describe block –  Michal Charemza Apr 10 at 12:28
1  
You can combine the approaches of $provide and spies. They're not mutually exclusive: you can see more at stackoverflow.com/a/22954343/1319998 . Regarding your last question: the function is defined in the test and so can return anything you like. But yes, it might be better to use a spy to a) check that it's been called, and b) define the return value closer to the test, which might be clearer. However you should also make sure that you test what happens after the call to the service. In my case, it was checking that success was set to true on the scope. –  Michal Charemza Apr 12 at 13:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Then I came across another post, blog, stackoverflow example (you pick it I was probably there), and I saw the use of the $q library. Duh! Why set up a whole mock promise when we can just use the tool that Angular gives us. Our code looks nicer and makes more sense to look at - no ugly promise.then.mostRecent thing.

Next in the iteration of unit testing was this:

describe('Controller: Products', function () {
    var//iable declarations
        $scope,
        $rootScope,
        $q,
        $controller,
        productService,
        PRODUCTS = [{},{},{}] //constant for the products that are returned by the service
    ;

    beforeEach(function () {
        module('App.Controllers.Products');
        module('App.Services.Products');
    });


    beforeEach(inject(function (_$controller_, _$rootScope_, _$q_, _products_) {
        $rootScope = _$rootScope_;
        $q = _$q_;
        $controller = _$controller_;
        productService = _products_;
        $scope = $rootScope.$new();
    }));

    function setupController(product, resolve) {
        //Need a function so we can setup different instances of the controller
        var getProducts = $q.defer();

        //Set up our spies
        spyOn(products, 'getProducts').andReturn(getProducts.promise);

        //Initialise the controller
        $controller('ProductsController', {
            $scope: $scope,
            products: productService
        });

        // Use $scope.$apply() to get the promise to resolve on nextTick().
        // Angular only resolves promises following a digest cycle,
        // so we manually fire one off to get the promise to resolve.
        if(resolve) {
            $scope.$apply(function() {
                getProducts.resolve(PRODUCTS[product]);
            });
        } else {
            $scope.$apply(function() {
                getProducts.reject();
            });
        }
    }

    describe('Resolving and Rejecting the Promise', function () {
        it('should return the first PRODUCT when the promise is resolved', function () {
            setupController(0, true); // Set up our controller to return the first product and resolve the promise. 
            expect('to return the first PRODUCT when the promise is resolved');
        });

        it('should return nothing when the promise is rejected', function () {
            setupController(0, false); // Set up our controller to return first product, but not to resolve the promise. 
            expect('to return nothing when the promise is rejected');
        });
    });
});

This started to feel like the way it should be set up. We can mock what we need to mock we can set our promise to resolve and reject so we can truly test the two possible outcomes. This feels good...

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