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I am receiving a java.sql.Timestamp in UTC for example:

2014-04-03 08:25:20.0

I know, that this timestamp is in UTC. And I know that the target timezone for this timestamp. Example:

Europe/Berlin

Now I 'd like to convert the UTC timestmap to a localized timestamp. With the correct daylight savings, of course.

My attempt so far:

println(msg.timestamp)
println(new DateTime(msg.timestamp))
val storeTz = DateTimeZone.forID(store.timezone)
println(new DateTime(msg.timestamp, storeTz))
val localTimestamp = new DateTime(msg.timestamp).withZone(storeTz)
println(localTimestamp)

This prints:

2014-04-03 08:25:20.0
2014-04-03T08:25:20.000+02:00
2014-04-03T07:25:20.000+01:00
2014-04-03T07:25:20.000+01:00

Shouldn't the correct localized timestamp be:

2014-04-03T10:25:20.000+02:00
share|improve this question
    
It says +02:00 behind. 10:00 + 02:00 would be 12:00 I think. (Notice the missing ( ) around the +02:00). So 08:00 +02:00 might already be your desired output, only wrong formated. –  ifLoop Apr 3 at 8:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think that this might work

println(msg.timestamp)
println(new DateTime(msg.timestamp))
val storeTz = DateTimeZone.forID(store.timezone)
println(new DateTime(msg.timestamp, storeTz))
val localTimestamp = new DateTime(msg.timestamp).withZoneRetainFields(DateTimeZone.UTC).toDateTime(storeTz)
println(localTimestamp)
share|improve this answer
    
This is close to correct. Now I am getting the localized timestamp but it seems that the current daylight saving is now taken into account. The out put is 2014-04-03T09:25:20.000+02:00 –  Coxer Apr 3 at 9:07
    
according to the world clock this is correct. The time in Europe/Berlin differs 2 hours from UTC. –  mmjmanders Apr 3 at 9:20
    
Huh? But then a fully localized timestamp should be 2014-04-03T10:25:20.000+02:00 shouldn't it? –  Coxer Apr 3 at 9:23
1  
I see the problem now, you have to say that the timestamp is in the UTC timezone but retain the field values. Then convert to the correct timezone. See edits. –  mmjmanders Apr 3 at 9:46
1  
See JavaDoc –  mmjmanders Apr 3 at 9:49

The other answer seems needlessly complicated. Here is my take using Joda-Time 2.3.

Berlin is 2 hours ahead of UTC because of Daylight Saving Time nonsense. So if UTC is 8 AM, then Berlin is 10 AM.

String inputRaw = "2014-04-03 08:25:20.0";
String input = inputRaw.replace( " ", "T" ); // Convert to strict ISO 8601 format.

DateTime dateTimeUtc = new DateTime( input, DateTimeZone.UTC );

DateTimeZone timeZoneBerlin = DateTimeZone.forID( "Europe/Berlin" );
DateTime dateTimeBerlin = dateTimeUtc.withZone( timeZoneBerlin );

Dump to console…

System.out.println( "input: " + input );
System.out.println( "dateTimeUtc: " + dateTimeUtc );
System.out.println( "dateTimeBerlin: " + dateTimeBerlin );

When run…

input: 2014-04-03T08:25:20.0
dateTimeUtc: 2014-04-03T08:25:20.000Z
dateTimeBerlin: 2014-04-03T10:25:20.000+02:00
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