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I planned to use setInterval to simply set a variable to false, which would be inspected by the main loop to stop. Example (note: this is an example only, the acutal code is not a while() loop which would be easy to reconstruct, but a quite complex, and long to execute script generated by a closed source software actually):

var running = true;
setInterval(function () {
  if (running) {
    console.log("Stopping now!");
    running = false;
  }
}, 100);

while (running) {
  // do something ...
}

However it does not seem to work at least firefox drops a "busy script" box after a while. What's the problem with the code above? setInterval() may not be able to run if your script already runs otherwise? I couldn't find an exact specification what setInterval() does exactly.

I would need something like this, since I already have huge (and very long to execute) script, so I thought I will try to stop it after a while, then using setTimeout() to let the browser breath a bit and then continue: as the script itself does know its internal state so it can continue from any point, but it's not an option to modify the script actually ....

If it's not possible with setInterval, is there any alternative to this, without any modification in the "long to execute" code itself?

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If it's not possible with setInterval, is there any alternative to this, without any modification in the "long to execute" code itself?

One possibility is to make that a web worker rather than trying to use it on the UI thread. Despite people repeatedly saying so, JavaScript is not single-threaded (JavaScript, the language, is silent on the subject), not even on browsers anymore. In the browser environment, there is one main UI thread, but you can spawn other worker threads (web workers). The worker(s) and the main UI code can communicate via postMessage / onmessage.

Here's an example of a web worker in action. This page uses JavaScript on the UI thread to start a web worker, which runs on a separate thread. The worker runs for 10 seconds, busily updating a counter (this is just to simulate a long-running, calculation-intensive process), and sends updates to the UI thread every second:

Main page:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
<title>Worker Example</title>
<style type="text/css">

body {
    font-family: sans-serif;
}
</style>
<meta charset="UTF-8">
</head>
<body>

<script>
(function() {
    var worker = new Worker("worker.js");
    worker.onmessage = function(e) {
        display("Worker says " + e.data);
    };
    display("Starting worker");
    worker.postMessage("start");

    function display(msg) {
        var p = document.createElement('p');
        p.innerHTML = String(msg);
        document.body.appendChild(p);
    }
})();
</script>
</body>
</html>

worker.js:

this.onmessage = function(e) {
    var counter, lastUpdate, now;

    if (e.data === "start") {
        // Loop without yeilding for 10 seconds, sending updates
        // to the UI every second.
        start = lastUpdate = Date.now();
        counter = 0;
        do {
            ++counter;
            now = Date.now();
            if (now - lastUpdate > 1000) {
                lastUpdate = now;
                this.postMessage(counter);
            }
        }
        while (now - start < 10000);
        this.postMessage("Done");
    }
};

(You're not required to make the worker wait for a message to start, but it's fairly common.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, web worker seems to be a nice solution. Though in my example I wrote a simple while() loop which is easy to reconstruct, the actual long-to-execute script is not like this and it's not so much possible to modify it, as it's a generated JS code by a closed source software emiting an JS file only (and it's even not the same if you generate that again). Maybe putting it into a worker thread would work somehow, I'll try. –  LGB Apr 3 at 9:42
    
@LGB: Ah, I get it. I thought the while loop was waiting for the other code to complete (which doesn't work :-) ). I've removed that first paragraph. Best, –  T.J. Crowder Apr 3 at 9:43

The problem is that Javascript is single-threaded. Rewrite your while loop to use setInterval itself and everything should work, since you will release the thread at the end of each loop.

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...but it's not an option to modify the script actually. Well there's a problem. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 3 at 9:20
    
yes, it is ... Since it's generated by a software and not even the same all the time. The software is a closed source thing :( –  LGB Apr 3 at 9:24
    
@LGB: the while loop's part of the original script, right? –  Qantas 94 Heavy Apr 3 at 9:25
    
Ok, my fault, it was only a very stupid example/test script, not the actual one (which is really huge and complex). Please read the comment I did for T.J. Crowder's answer. Sorry for the confusion. –  LGB Apr 3 at 9:54

You should use setTimeout or setInterval instead while loop. JS runs in single thread, so infinite loop will freeze your browser.

var running = true;
setInterval(function(){
   if(running){
      console.log('Stopping now!');
      running = false;
   }
}, 100);

(function loop(){
    // Do yours loop stuff
    if( running ){
       setTimeout(loop, 0);
    }
})();
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You should consider using Worker or writing asynchronous code.

Or you can modify your code.

var running = true;
var past = Date.now();
while (running) {
    // do heavy calculations ...



    if ((Date.now() - past) > 10) {
        running = false;
    }
}

Of course, blocking loops aren't good idea, but I don't see good way to satisfy requirement:

If it's not possible with setInterval, is there any alternative to this, without any modification in the "long to execute" code itself?

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2  
"Or you can modify your code." What's the point of a busy-loop that waits 10ms? –  T.J. Crowder Apr 3 at 9:25
1  
The Worker suggestion is good but your code example below is not. –  filmor Apr 3 at 9:30
    
@filmor: my example was meant to test the theory that I can do this, or not. It as a simple test example that I wanted to try if my idea works. It didn't. –  LGB Apr 3 at 9:57

JavaScript runs in a single threaded event loop. What this means is while your code is running no other code can run. This is why your callback does not get executed.

You can workaround this by also making your while(running) be asynchronous. Consider doing the following:

var running = true;
var monitor = setInterval(function () {
  if (running) {
    console.log("Stopping now!");
    running = false;
    clearInterval(monitor);
  }
}, 100);

var work = setInterval(function() {
    if (running) {
        // do something
    } else {
        clearInterval(work);
    }
}, 1);

Don't forget to call clearInterval!

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