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is there a way to align first line of multiple headings of various size to the same baseline? Also regardless to the text that follows, which should be aligned as well.

See picture at http://snapplr.com/snap/z1mw please

EDIT: re-uploaded:

alt text

It seems to me the only solution is to put each heading and each body text into separate DIV and then with headings to play with padding-top or margin-top to align them (e.g. H1 would be 36px with 0px margin, while H3 would be 24px with 12px top margin). Something like this:

<html>
<head>
    <style type="text/css" media="all">
        div {
            width: 240px;
            float: left;
        }

        h1 {
            font-size: 36px;
            margin: 0;
            padding: 0;
        }

        h3 {
            font-size: 24px;
            margin: 0;
            padding: 10px 0 0 0; /*for some reason I must use 10px instead of 12px to align. Why??*/
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div>
        <h1>H1 heading</h1>
    </div>
    <div>
        <h3>H3 heading</h3>
    </div>
    <div>
        <h3>H3 heading that is somewhat longer and spans multiple lines</h3>
    </div>
    <div style="clear:both;"></div>
    <div>
        <p>There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don't look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn't anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.</p>
    </div>
    <div>
        <p>There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don't look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn't anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.</p>
    </div>
    <div>
        <p>There are many variations of passages of Lorem Ipsum available, but the majority have suffered alteration in some form, by injected humour, or randomised words which don't look even slightly believable. If you are going to use a passage of Lorem Ipsum, you need to be sure there isn't anything embarrassing hidden in the middle of text. All the Lorem Ipsum generators on the Internet tend to repeat predefined chunks as necessary, making this the first true generator on the Internet. It uses a dictionary of over 200 Latin words, combined with a handful of model sentence structures, to generate Lorem Ipsum which looks reasonable. The generated Lorem Ipsum is therefore always free from repetition, injected humour, or non-characteristic words etc.</p>
    </div>
</body>

But this is not very nice solution. Is there something better, please?

Thank you very much!

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Welcome to Stack Overflow. –  Pekka 웃 Feb 17 '10 at 18:34
    
I checked your sample in photoshop and you do need 12 px - it is just some kind of optical illusion due to the serifs the font has :) –  easwee Feb 17 '10 at 18:44
    
Zoomed in img682.imageshack.us/img682/1604/optic.jpg –  easwee Feb 17 '10 at 18:46
    
easwee that's strange coz when I zoom it, 12px seems too much: img704.imageshack.us/img704/6513/screenshot2010021722h53.jpg Safari 4 on Mac Pekka - thank you –  Josef Richter Feb 17 '10 at 22:03

3 Answers 3

The web handles baselines differently than you are used to in print. Browsers will align your text to the center of the line-height, rather than the bottom. This means text aligned to the web grid are vertically centered in relation to each other rather than sitting on the same baseline.

If you are OK with that, you can still get a strong grid from it. You just have to be exact with your combined use of line-height, padding, borders and margins. It takes some math, but is entirely possible. More here:

http://24ways.org/2006/compose-to-a-vertical-rhythm/

If you need things actually aligned to a baseline as you know it in print, the game is much more difficult. The problem is that you will need to push things various amounts depending on the exact font - hardly possible when each browser may be using a different font. Here is one attempt to make that possible:

http://baselinecss.com/

With either solution there are cross-browser problems. The web just doesn't offer the proper tools for this yet. But in no case should you need the divs. You can do all that adjustment on the headings themselves. You don't even need them in your example. Why are the divs there?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Eric, The 24ways article seems to show the same solution I arrived at, i.e. fiddling with line-height, padding, etc. Was just hoping I'm missing some hidden CSS features/solutions which make life easier :-) baselinecss.com seems promissing. Need to dig into the code to see what exactly it does. As regards the divs - that was the only way I could think of to align the first line of following paragraphs, in case I have headings with various lines count (see image in original post). I'd be glad to see a better solution, as this one makes the code a bit clumsy :-( –  Josef Richter Mar 5 '10 at 13:28
    
Not only are they a bit clumsy, but they destroy any sense of semantics, as the headers aren't attached to their content in the source-order. You may as well be using tables at that point. No reason to keep pure-CSS if you are willing to sacrifice all your semantics to make it work anyway. I'd do semantics first, and then add in some jQuery if you really need the effect. –  Eric M Suzanne Mar 5 '10 at 23:17

To me using padding-top to set top spacing is a crossbrowser solution and works by writing only one line of css, so I would go with that. Only catch is in case you change the font you have to readjust the padding.

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a good solution albeit not good enough if you're a perfectionist, as in, it works in most cases, but it's not a crossbrowser solution. Not all systems use the same fonts you know. So when you think you're using arial, I may be seeing helvetica or some liberty font family equivalent (the latter is slightly larger). –  vise Feb 17 '10 at 19:15
    
True - forgot about font-families - that can be tricky too. –  easwee Feb 17 '10 at 19:32
    
Yes, this seems to be the easiest solution to get satisfactory result. Do I really need to readjust when I change font? font-size:10px; will always remain 10px, regardless the font... I find it cross-browser safe as long as I use web-safe fonts. –  Josef Richter Mar 5 '10 at 13:39

Just a quick thought (as in "I had this idea, that might work, but I didn't test it"): How about using line-height? You could use the same line-height for all headlines, thereby ensuring a uniform baseline on all lines.

Regards Jesper Hauge

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