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Can someone explain in simple terms to me what a Directed acyclic graph is? I have looked on Wikipedia but it doesn't really make me see its use in programming.

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Wikipedia frequently contains overwhelming technical content that would take beginners a great deal of studying to comprehend. Many of the math help sites are superior in this regard, but they tend not to get into computation related subjects, unfortunately. –  Jonathon Faust Feb 17 '10 at 19:41

9 Answers 9

up vote 11 down vote accepted

graph = structure consisting of nodes, that are connected to each other with edges

directed = the connections between the nodes (edges) have a direction: A -> B is not the same as B -> A

acyclic = "non-circular" = moving from node to node by following the edges, you will never encounter the same node for the second time.

Basically a directed acyclic graph is a tree.

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I understand what nodes are. When you say "edge", do you mean an arrow pointing from Node A to Node B? –  Zubair Feb 17 '10 at 19:30
    
Better explanation. So what has this got to do with programming? Is it related to functional programming? –  Zubair Feb 17 '10 at 19:32
    
It's typically represented by an arrow, but it's really just that there is a relation between A and B. In your program this might be a true value in an adjacency matrix at the indices representing those two nodes. –  tvanfosson Feb 17 '10 at 19:32
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All directed trees are DAGs, but not all DAGs are trees. The DAG A->B, A->C, B->C cannot be represented as a tree since node C has more than one parent. –  Jason S Feb 17 '10 at 19:39
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Directedness of edges is not the only feature separating DAGs from trees. A DAG can have more than |V|-1 edges, unlike a tree. For instance, A->B, A->C, B->D, C->D is a DAG but clearly not a tree since it has the same number of edges and nodes. –  stubbscroll Feb 24 '10 at 10:17

Example uses of a directed acyclic graph in programming include more or less anything that represents connectivity and causality.

For example, suppose you have a computation pipeline that is configurable at runtime. As one example of this, suppose computations A,B,C,D,E,F, and G depend on each other: A depends on C, C depends on E and F, B depends on D and E, and D depends on F. This can be represented as a DAG. Once you have the DAG in memory, you can write algorithms to:

  • make sure the computations are evaluated in the correct order (topological sort)
  • if computations can be done in parallel but each computation has a maximum execution time, you can calculate the maximum execution time of the entire set

among many other things.

Outside the realm of application programming, any decent automated build tool (make, ant, scons, etc.) will use DAGs to ensure proper build order of the components of a program.

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+1 for mention of causality. This comes up a lot when you need to represent a complex systems where the output of one process is the input for one or more other processes. –  Alex Feinman Feb 17 '10 at 20:03
    
+1 for the multiple uses of a DAG. –  Frank Shearar Jul 26 '10 at 7:44

Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAG) have the following properties which distinguish them from other graphs:

  1. Their edges show direction.
  2. They don't have cycles.

Well, I can think of one use right now - DAG (known as Wait-For-Graphs - more technical details) are handy in detecting deadlocks as they illustrate the dependencies amongst a set of processes and resources (both are nodes in the DAG). Deadlock would happen when a cycle is detected.

I hope this helps.

cheers

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Andriyev, +1 for the deadlock example. This is in fact used by MySQL's InnoDB engine, and they call it a "wait-for-graph", as in, "that row has to wait for the lock on that row to be released" –  Roland Bouman Feb 17 '10 at 19:40
    
yes, you are dead right with the name - Wait For Graph. Some how missed that. Updated the response. :) –  Andriyev Feb 17 '10 at 19:43
    
How do they know there is a dependency? Is it by checking to see if two nodes have a common ancestor? –  Zubair Feb 18 '10 at 8:38
    
This link -cis.temple.edu/~ingargio/cis307/readings/deadlock.html has more technical details. –  Andriyev Feb 18 '10 at 14:10

Several answers have given examples of the use of graphs (e.g. network modeling) and you've asked "what does this have to do with programming?".

The answer to that sub-question is that it doesn't have much of anything to do with programming. It has to do with problem solving.

Just like linked-lists are data structures used for certain classes of problems, graphs are useful for representing certain relationships. Linked lists, trees, graphs, and other abstract structures only have a connection to programming in that you can implement them in code. They exist at a higher level of abstraction. It's not about programming, it's about applying data structures in the solution of problems.

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Can be implemented in programming. Yes, I like that, as graphs exist in the real world independant of computers! –  Zubair Feb 18 '10 at 8:44

I assume you already know basic graph terminology; otherwise you should start from the article on graph theory.

Directed refers to the fact that the edges (connections) have directions. In the diagram, these directions are shown by the arrows. The opposite is an undirected graph, whose edges don't specify directions.

Acyclic means that, if you start from a random node X and walk through all possible edges (following the edge directions), you will not return to X. Naturally, this is only possible in a directed graph (otherwise you could go from node X to some node Y, then back to X).

Several applications:

  • Spreadsheets; this is explained in the DAG article.
  • Revision control: if you have a look at the diagram in that page, you will see that the evolution of revision-controlled code is directed (it goes "down", in this diagram) and acyclic (it never goes back "up").
  • Family tree: it's directed (you are your parents' child, not the other way around) and acyclic (your ancestors can never be your descendant).
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Graphs, of all sorts, are used in programming to model various different real-world relationships. For example, a social network is often represented by a graph (cyclic in this case). Likewise, network topologies, family trees, airline routes, ...

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dots with lines pointing to other dots

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+1 FOR A FUNNY ANSWER! :) –  Zubair Dec 14 '12 at 12:03

From a source code or even three address(TAC) code perspective you can visualize the problem really easily at this page...

http://cgm.cs.mcgill.ca/~hagha/topic30/topic30.html#Exptree

If you go to the expression tree section, and then page down a bit it shows the "topological sorting" of the tree, and the algorithm for how to evaluate the expression.

So in that case you can use the DAG to evaluate expressions, which is handy since evaluation is normally interpreted and using such a DAG evaluator will make simple intrepreters faster in principal because it is not pushing and popping to a stack and also because it is eliminating common sub-expressions.

The basic algorithm to compute the DAG in non ancient egyptian(ie English) is this:

1) Make your DAG object like so

You need a live list and this list holds all the current live DAG nodes and DAG sub-expressions. A DAG sub expression is a DAG Node, or you can also call it an internal node. What I mean by live DAG Node is that if you assign to a variable X then it becomes live. A common sub-expression that then uses X uses that instance. If X is assigned to again then a NEW DAG NODE is created and added to the live list and the old X is removed so the next sub-expression that uses X will refer to the new instance and thus will not conflict with sub-expressions that merely use the same variable name.

Once you assign to a variable X, then co-incidentally all the DAG sub-expression nodes that are live at the point of assignment become not-live, since the new assignment invalidates the meaning of sub expressions using the old value.

class Dag {
  TList LiveList;
  DagNode Root;
}

// In your DagNode you need a way to refer to the original things that
// the DAG is computed from. In this case I just assume an integer index
// into the list of variables and also an integer index for the opertor for
// Nodes that refer to operators. Obviously you can create sub-classes for
// different kinds of Dag Nodes.
class DagNode {
  int Variable;
  int Operator;// You can also use a class
  DagNode Left;
  DagNode Right;
  DagNodeList Parents;
}

So what you do is walk through your tree in your own code, such as a tree of expressions in source code for example. Call the existing nodes XNodes for example.

So for each XNode you need to decide how to add it into the DAG, and there is the possibility that it is already in the DAG.

This is very simple pseudo code. Not intended for compilation.

DagNode XNode::GetDagNode(Dag dag) {
  if (XNode.IsAssignment) {
    // The assignment is a special case. A common sub expression is not
    // formed by the assignment since it creates a new value.

    // Evaluate the right hand side like normal
    XNode.RightXNode.GetDagNode();  


    // And now take the variable being assigned to out of the current live list
    dag.RemoveDagNodeForVariable(XNode.VariableBeingAssigned);

    // Also remove all DAG sub expressions using the variable - since the new value
    // makes them redundant
    dag.RemoveDagExpressionsUsingVariable(XNode.VariableBeingAssigned);

    // Then make a new variable in the live list in the dag, so that references to
    // the variable later on will see the new dag node instead.
    dag.AddDagNodeForVariable(XNode.VariableBeingAssigned);

  }
  else if (XNode.IsVariable) {
    // A variable node has no child nodes, so you can just proces it directly
    DagNode n = dag.GetDagNodeForVariable(XNode.Variable));
    if (n) XNode.DagNode = n;
    else {
      XNode.DagNode = dag.CreateDagNodeForVariable(XNode.Variable);
    }
    return XNode.DagNode;
  }
  else if (XNode.IsOperator) {
    DagNode leftDagNode = XNode.LeftXNode.GetDagNode(dag);
    DagNode rightDagNode = XNode.RightXNode.GetDagNode(dag);


    // Here you can observe how supplying the operator id and both operands that it
    // looks in the Dags live list to check if this expression is already there. If
    // it is then it returns it and that is how a common sub-expression is formed.
    // This is called an internal node.
    XNode.DagNode = 
      dag.GetOrCreateDagNodeForOperator(XNode.Operator,leftDagNode,RightDagNode) );

    return XNode.DagNode;
  }
}

So that is one way of looking at it. A basic walk of the tree and just adding in and referring to the Dag nodes as it goes. The root of the dag is whatever DagNode the root of the tree returns for example.

Obviously the example procedure can be broken up into smaller parts or made as sub-classes with virtual functions.

As for sorting the Dag, you go through each DagNode from left to right. In other words follow the DagNodes left hand edge, and then the right hand side edge. The numbers are assigned in reverse. In other words when you reach a DagNode with no children, assign that Node the current sorting number and increment the sorting number, so as the recursion unwinds the numbers get assigned in increasing order.

This example only handles trees with nodes that have zero or two children. Obviously some trees have nodes with more than two children so the logic is still the same. Instead of computing left and right, compute from left to right etc...

// Most basic DAG topological ordering example.
void DagNode::OrderDAG(int* counter) {
  if (this->AlreadyCounted) return;

  // Count from left to right
  for x = 0 to this->Children.Count-1
    this->Children[x].OrderDag(counter)

  // And finally number the DAG Node here after all
  // the children have been numbered
  this->DAGOrder = *counter;

  // Increment the counter so the caller gets a higher number
  *counter = *counter + 1;

  // Mark as processed so will count again
  this->AlreadyCounted = TRUE;
}
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A directed acyclic graph is useful when you want to represent...a directed acyclic graph! The canonical example is a family tree or genealogy.

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Ah, that makes sense too. But still, what has this got to do with programming? –  Zubair Feb 17 '10 at 19:37
    
What does any data structure have to do with programming? –  Jonathan Feinberg Feb 17 '10 at 19:46
    
OK, I understand. Its just that you didn't mention "data structure" in your answer –  Zubair Feb 18 '10 at 8:42
    
Tautology != explanation –  Eva Jul 9 '12 at 1:39

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