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For example:

class ClassA<TA> where TA: T1, T2, T3, T4 ...
{
}

class ClassB<TB> where TB: whatever ClassA.TA accepts
{
  ClassA<TB> MyA;
}

I don't want to copy ClassA's constraint to ClassB because of SSoT and DRY principles.

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If you have a generic base class, you can't even inherit generic constraints, and that's a far more closely aligned scenario than here where you just happen to make use of another class (i.e. the compiler already would know exactly which type you'd like to align your constraints with) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 3 '14 at 14:25
    
What T1,T2, T3, T4, ... have in common? It should be extracted to common interface and used by both constrains. –  Konrad Kokosa Apr 3 '14 at 14:25
    
What's wrong with copy-paste? –  dasblinkenlight Apr 3 '14 at 14:29
    
@KonradKokosa That may not be an option. It would mean you'd need to be going around to any class used as a generic argument here and ensuring it implements that interface; that may not be possible. For example, you may not be able to edit a BCL type to ensure it implements IEnumerable, IDisposable, IComparable, IEquatable, even if you need all of those constraints. –  Servy Apr 3 '14 at 14:29
    
I'm interested in what the practical need for this is. I write some fairly generic-heavy code and I have not had this issue come up ever. I'm not saying that there isn't a use case, but I don't see it at the moment. It might be possible to refactor the model to not require this. –  George Mauer Apr 3 '14 at 14:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could do that if it was acceptable for ClassB to be a public inner class of ClassA. It's rather inelegant and ugly.

public class ClassA<T> where T : IDisposable
{
    public ClassA(T thing)
    {
        ThingA = thing;
    }
    public T ThingA { get; set; }
    public class ClassB
    {
        public ClassB(T thing)
        {
            ThingB = thing;
        }
        public T ThingB { get; set; }
    }
}

This lets me use this (horrible) syntax:

var b = new ClassA<Stream>.ClassB(stm);

I think that your better bet is to write the two obvious unit tests that use Type.GetGenericParameterConstraints to ensure that ClassA and ClassB are in sync.

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1  
I would prefer copy-paste to this. –  Romoku Apr 3 '14 at 14:38
    
There's no need for a unit test to ensure they're in sync. The code won't compile unless the second class has all of the constraints of the first, which is of course much much better. –  Servy Apr 3 '14 at 14:39
    
Romoku - I made no statement that this was pretty. Servy - edited to fix. No, if you don't use this (awful) solution and the compiler won't help you then the unit test is the only practical way to ensure that they're in sync. –  plinth Apr 3 '14 at 14:39
    
@plinth Yes, it will. Take the code in the OP but just don't apply any generic constraint to class B. It won't compile because the generic constraints aren't met. There is no need for a unit test. –  Servy Apr 3 '14 at 14:49

If I was in control of the type definitions then I would use a common interface.

public interface IBase { }

public class T1 : IBase { }
public class T2 : IBase { }

public class ClassA<TA> where TA: IBase { }
public class ClassB<TB> where TB: IBase { }

Otherwise C# does not support preprocessor macros, implicit interfaces, or constraint aliasing, so you will need to copy-paste the constraints.

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That may not be an option. It would mean you'd need to be going around to any class used as a generic argument here and ensuring it implements that interface; that may not be possible. For example, you may not be able to edit a BCL type to ensure it implements IEnumerable, IDisposable, IComparable, IEquatable, even if you need all of those constraints. Just because a type implements all of the interfaces needed for the generic argument doesn't mean you can ensure it implements your custom interface. –  Servy Apr 3 '14 at 14:30
    
I see your point, but I've never come across that case. –  Romoku Apr 3 '14 at 14:36

There is no C# language mechanism that would do this. The best that you could hope for would be that some 3rd party tool could potentially list them out for you, but that of course wouldn't stay up to date with any changes to ClassA.

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