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Program as of now counts the occurrence of every character in the ASCII Code, When testing yesterday it was working perfectly with no errors on even the biggest case that I tried (The novel Huck Finn). I loaded it today and tested it again and it gives me a segmentation fault. I did not change or add any code to it. It is the same code that was working perfectly yesterday. I do not understand how it would work one day and not the next. When running the debugger I get this:

    Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
    0x00007ffff7343f01 in getc () from /lib64/libc.so.6

My code:

#include <cstdio>

using namespace std;

//==============================================================
//                  initialize
//==============================================================
// initialize(freq) initializes all values in the array pointed
// to by freq to 0.
//==============================================================
void initialize(int* freq)
{
   for(int i = 0; i<=256; i++)
   {
      freq[i]=0;
   } 
}

//==============================================================
//                  getFreq
//==============================================================
// getFreq(inf, freq) counts the number of occurences of each
// character in file inf and stores those numbers into the array
// freq at with the index number being the ASCII code for that 
// character
//==============================================================

void getFreq(FILE* inf, int* freq)
{
   int c = fgetc(inf);
   while(c != EOF)
   {
      freq[c]++;
      c = fgetc(inf);
   }  

}

//==============================================================
//                  showCount
//==============================================================
// showCount(freq) prints the counts of the characters stored in
// freq at with the indexs being the ASCII code for each charater.
// *Does not print characters that do not occur
//==============================================================

void showCount(int* freq)
{
   for(int i = 0; i <= 256; i++)
   {
      if(freq[i]> 0)
      {
         if(i == ' ')
         {
            printf("Spaces: %i \n", freq[i]);
         }
         else if(i == '\n')
         {
            printf("Newlines: %i \n", freq[i]);
         }
         else if(i == '\t')
         {
            printf("Tabs: %i \n", freq[i]);
         }
         else if(i == '.')
         {
            printf("Periods: %i \n", freq[i]);
         }
         else
         {
            printf("%c's: %i \n",i , freq[i]);
         }
      }
   }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
   int* freq = new int[256];
   initialize(freq);
   FILE* inf = fopen(argv[1], "r");
   getFreq(inf, freq);
   showCount(freq);
   fclose(inf);
}​
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2  
You are allocating 256 ints, but initializing 257 (0-256). –  Plow Apr 3 '14 at 18:34
    
Also, memset is wonderful for zeroing memory. Why roll your own? Any reason you allocate freq dynamically? Why use int if it can never be below 0? Why bother closing the file, if you don't free the memory )not that either matters)? –  Deduplicator Apr 3 '14 at 18:35
    
To avoid such problems, use std::vector instead of a dynamically allocated array. Not guaranteed, but problems like "index out of bounds" may get recognized and generate a readable error message instead of a segmentation fault. –  anatolyg Apr 3 '14 at 18:40
    
Also, why are you dynamically allocating memory for freq? Just declare an array int freq[256]; –  PaulMcKenzie Apr 3 '14 at 18:58
    
Disregard the question I am used to having to redirect the input to the file and did not notice that I was doing that instead of putting it as a command line argument. Sorry. –  DMG Apr 3 '14 at 19:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You are using i<=256 in your code everywhere when the array actually has just 256 elements starting from index 0 to index 255. The code exhibits Undefined Behavior. Worked fine yesterday and bit me in the ass today is a perfect example of what can happen when code exhibits UB.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I notice that I was out of bounds right after I submitted the question. It it still doesn't solve the problem. I put in a test to show if it was reading in the file or not, and its not. Why would it read it in one day and not the next? –  DMG Apr 3 '14 at 18:55
    
Look at your initialize() function. There is no guarantee that it will even return after you assigned 0 to freq[256]. Once you did that, then anything can happen, including "working" or crashing on the spot. –  PaulMcKenzie Apr 3 '14 at 19:00
    
Thanks for pointing out the Out of Bounds mistakes. I found my problem though I am used to having to redirect the input to the file and did not notice that I was doing that instead of putting it as a command line argument. –  DMG Apr 3 '14 at 19:04

You're not checking the return value of fopen and overrunning a buffer by accessing an element outside an array (index 256 of an array that goes from 0-255).

share|improve this answer
    
Okay well I put in a test to show if it was reading in the file or not and its not. Why would it read it in one day and not the next? –  DMG Apr 3 '14 at 18:49
    
@DMG - When you overrun a buffer, the behavior of the program is undefined. That is how C++ works -- make an error like this, and all bets are off. –  PaulMcKenzie Apr 3 '14 at 18:53
    
@DMG Either Paul's answer or file permission problems or maybe the file is in the wrong directory. If fopen fails you can call perror to get the exact problem whether it be file not found or permissions error or something. –  Jesus Ramos Apr 3 '14 at 19:01

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