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This is a question I have asked myself many times in the past as I nested using statements 5 deep.

Reading the docs and finding no mention either way regarding other disposables instantiated within the block I decided it was a good Q for SO archives.

Consider this:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection())
{
    var conn2 = new SqlConnection();
}

// is conn2 disposed?
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7 Answers 7

No they are not. Only the set of variables explicitly listed in the using clause will be automatically disposed.

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1  
So you'll need to nest your using's 6 deep :-) –  Eric J. Feb 17 '10 at 22:43
1  
I guess you have a fan club Jared.. lol.. –  Sky Sanders Feb 17 '10 at 23:00

If you want the exact rules for the using statement see section 8.13 of the specification. All your questions should be clearly answered there.

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@eric, thanks for the reference. I posted this Q after having sussed it out with the tests in my answer more as a public service than anything else. –  Sky Sanders Feb 17 '10 at 23:02
2  
@Eric: care to supply a link to the spec, for those who don't know the way to MSDN? –  John Saunders Feb 17 '10 at 23:39
    
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Obviously I have the answer... ;-)

The answer is no. Only the objects in the using declaration are disposed

[Test]
public void TestUsing()
{
    bool innerDisposed = false;
    using (var conn = new SqlConnection())
    {
        var conn2 = new SqlConnection();
        conn2.Disposed += (sender, e) => { innerDisposed = true; };
    }

    Assert.False(innerDisposed); // not disposed
}

[Test]
public void TestUsing2()
{
    bool innerDisposed = false;
    using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(), conn2 = new SqlConnection())
    {
        conn2.Disposed += (sender, e) => { innerDisposed = true; };
    }
    Assert.True(innerDisposed); // disposed, of course
}
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FYI: I had the answer in the clipboard before I submitted the question. –  Sky Sanders Feb 23 '10 at 15:49
    
I think it is technically possible for that thread to somehow get suspended such that SqlConnection.Dispose() would get called by Component.Finalizer() between the conn2 variable going out of scope and your Assert line. There is a race condition here, is there not? –  binki Feb 11 at 19:37

No. Using causes the object in the using statement to be disposed. If you want both of your objects to be disposed, you should rewrite this as:

using (var conn = new SqlConnection())
{
    using (var conn2 = new SqlConnection())
    {
        // use both connections here...
    }
}

Or, alternatively, you can use the more succinct syntax:

using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(), conn2 = new SqlConnection())
{
    // use both connections here...
}
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4  
Note that you can write this more compactly. "using(SqlConn conn1 = new SqlConn(), conn2 = new SqlConn()) { stuff }" –  Eric Lippert Feb 17 '10 at 22:43
    
Also, a using statement rather than a block (using(var conn=new SqlConnection())using(var conn2=new SqlConnection()){ ... }) will be lined up nicely in Visual Studio. It won't indent the second using. –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Feb 17 '10 at 22:57
    
@Eric Lippert: I updated to show that option, too... @Jeffrey: I tend to not do that, as StyleCop complains if you don't use braces for each statement. –  Reed Copsey Feb 17 '10 at 23:21

No, it doesn't work, conn2 will not be disposed. Note that multiples using are the only situation where I allow not using brackets for more lisibility :

        using (var pen = new Pen(color, 1))
        using (var brush = new SolidBrush(color))
        using (var fontM60 = new Font("Arial", 15F, FontStyle.Bold, GraphicsUnit.Pixel))
        using (var fontM30 = new Font("Arial", 12F, FontStyle.Bold, GraphicsUnit.Pixel))
        using (var fontM15 = new Font("Arial", 12F, FontStyle.Regular, GraphicsUnit.Pixel))
        using (var fontM05 = new Font("Arial", 10F, FontStyle.Regular, GraphicsUnit.Pixel))
        using (var fontM01 = new Font("Arial", 8F, FontStyle.Regular, GraphicsUnit.Pixel))
        using (var stringFormat = new StringFormat())
        {
        }

This way, nested using are not a big deal.

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No. Check the generated IL with ILDASM or Reflector.

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you are just too fast for me to QnA myself.... –  Sky Sanders Feb 17 '10 at 22:36

Only the variables within the using() will be disposed, not the actual code block. .

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