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So I've been trying to finish up the following lab for university. Most of this code was supplied to us, but we were told to fill in the methods for the LinkedStack.java code. The concept is pretty simple, each Node() object contains an Object type variable (an Integer in this case) and another Node() object. The LinkedStack() class is meant to initialize these Nodes and set a limit on the amount of them. The problem is, after executing StackTest.java, the following is returned:

18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18 18
6 6 6 6 6 6

When it is supposed to return the following:

18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0
6 5 4 3 2 1

P.S. The code is extensively commented on, so I'm sure you'll be able to figure out whatever I haven't mentioned. Also, StackADT is just a simple interface, all it does is state the methods used in LinkedStack.

And of course, thanks so much to anyone who helps!

Here is the all of the code (Sorry, I'm new here and didn't know how to keep it from grouping together):

    // ***************************************************************
    // LinkedStack.java
    //
    // A linked implementation of an Object stack class with operations push,
    // pop, and isEmpty and isFull.
    //
    // ***************************************************************
    public class LinkedStack implements StackADT {

    private Node top; // reference to top of stack
    private int size;
    private int counter = 0;

    // ---------------------------------------------------
    // Constructor -- initializes top
    // ---------------------------------------------------
      public LinkedStack() {
        top = new Node();
        size = 10;
      }

    // ---------------------------------------------------
    // Adds element to top of stack if it's not full, else
    // does nothing.
    // ---------------------------------------------------
      public void push(Object val) {
        counter++; 
        if(counter > 0 && counter <= size) {]
          top.setNext(top);
          top.setElement(val);
        }
        else {
          top.setElement(val);
        }
      }

    // ---------------------------------------------------
    // Removes and returns value at top of stack. If stack
    // is empty returns null.
    // ---------------------------------------------------
      public Object pop() {
        if (counter > 0) {
          Object val = top.getElement();
          top = top.getNext();
          counter--;
          return(val);
        }
        else {
          return(null);
        }
      }

    // ---------------------------------------------------
    // Returns true if stack is empty, false otherwise.
    // ---------------------------------------------------
      public boolean isEmpty() {
        if(counter == 0) {
          return(true);
        }
        else {
          return(false);
        }
      }

    // ---------------------------------------------------
    // Returns true if stack is full, false otherwise.
    // ---------------------------------------------------
      public boolean isFull() {
        if(counter == size) {
          return(true);
        }
        else {
          return(false);
        }
      }
    }

Node.java:

//***********************************************************
// Node.java
// A general node for a singly linked list of objects.
//***********************************************************

public class Node {

  private Node next;
  private Object element;

//----------------------------------------------------
// Creates an empty node
//----------------------------------------------------
  public Node() {
    next = null;
    element = null;
  }

//----------------------------------------------------
// Creates a node storing a specified element
//----------------------------------------------------
  public Node(Object element) {
    next = null;
    this.element = element;
  }

//----------------------------------------------------
// Returns the node that follows this one
//----------------------------------------------------
  public Node getNext() {
    return next;
  }

//----------------------------------------------------
// Sets the node that follows this one
//----------------------------------------------------
  public void setNext(Node node) {
    next = node;
  }

//----------------------------------------------------
// Returns the element stored in this node
//----------------------------------------------------
  public Object getElement() {
    return element;
  }

//----------------------------------------------------
// Sets the element stored in this node
//----------------------------------------------------
  public void setElement(Object element) {
    this.element = element;
  }
}

StackTest.java:

// *******************************************************
// StackTest.java
//
// A simple driver that exercises push, pop, isFull and isEmpty.
// Thanks to autoboxing, we can push integers onto a stack of Objects.
//
// *******************************************************

public class StackTest {

public static void main(String[] args) {
   StackADT stack = new LinkedStack ();

   //push some stuff on the stack
   for (int i=0; i<10; i++)
     stack.push(i*2);

   //pop and print
   //should print 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0
   while (!stack.isEmpty())
     System.out.print(stack.pop() + " ");
     System.out.println();

   //push a few more things
   for (int i=1; i<=6; i++)
     stack.push(i);

   //should print 6 5 4 3 2 1
   while (!stack.isEmpty())
     System.out.print(stack.pop() + " ");
     System.out.println();
  }
}
share|improve this question
3  
"Extensive" commenting != good commenting. //Returns true if stack is empty, false otherwise. comment on a method called isEmpty is unnecessary, and even distracting. –  Azar Apr 3 at 21:55
1  
@Azar Well had it been proper javadoc commenting, that comment absolutely should be there because you should describe what each method does regardless of how obvious it is for proper documentation. –  Jared Apr 3 at 21:59
3  
If we're going to take pot shots at the style of isEmpty(), shouldn't it be to suggest that its implementation should read return counter==0;? –  pamphlet Apr 3 at 22:02
1  
@Jared Fair point. As is though, it's superfluous, and the only people that can see that comment are those with access to the class anyway. –  Azar Apr 3 at 22:03
1  
To be fair to the both of you, this javadoc was supplied by the university to keep the students from getting confused. In fact, this is our first time visiting stacks, whereas we're all first years. –  user3495690 Apr 3 at 22:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A stack works by adding a new node to the top of the stack and setting its next reference to the previously top node.

You create a node on construction of the LinkedStack, then in the push method you set the reference to the next node to itself (making an infinite loop).

You shouldn't create the top node until you are instructed to push the first item. And the bottom-most item should have its next reference set to null to indicate that there are no more below it.

public void push(Object val) {
    if(!isFull()) {
        counter++;
        Node lastTop = top;
        top = new Node(val);
        top.setNext(lastTop);
    }
}

Your isEmpty() method just needs to check if top is null.

Your pop method is fine, but you should make use of the isEmpty method to make the code easier to understand:

public Object pop() {
    if(!isEmpty()) {
        counter--;
        Node lastTop = top;
        top = top.getNext();
        return lastTop.getElement();
    } else {
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but doesn't the else loop stop this from happening? It's supposed to give the top node an element first, and leave the next node as null. Then on the next run through, it will be pushed down and a new value will be assigned to it's element –  user3495690 Apr 3 at 22:02
    
That means you have a node in the stack with no element. Are you sure that's what you want? That certainly is not normal stack behaviour. –  Jason Apr 3 at 22:08
    
Edited to use isFull() in push() to make code easier to understand (rather than reader trying to figure out what the counter thing does). –  Jason Apr 3 at 22:14
    
Okay, I see.. You were right. The problem I'm facing now is that when I fill the stack, I seem to be getting a null pointer exception during the pop process. Any idea why this would be? It didn't happen until I entirely topped off the stack. (I modified the StackTest code to fill it) –  user3495690 Apr 3 at 22:32
    
Did you move the counter increment inside the if statement in the push() method? Are you popping more Nodes than you have on the stack? Are you still creating a Node in the constructor? –  Jason Apr 3 at 22:44
// ---------------------------------------------------
// Adds element to top of stack if it's not full, else
// does nothing.
// ---------------------------------------------------
  public void push(Object val) {
    counter++; 
    if(counter > 0 && counter <= size) {]
      top.setNext(top);
      top.setElement(val);
    }
    else {
      top.setElement(val);
    }

Look at top.setNext(top). This is why you're getting your output.

Read the comment. Now look at the if .. else. You're actually doing something when the stack is full.

Edit: Looking at other methods I can see logical flaws throughout. I would recommend using a pen and paper to decide what should be happening. Alternatively, start from scratch and implement a method at a time. Run the method and ensure it works as expected. If that works, add another method, test it and previous methods. I'm suggesting this as I assume you're fairly novice to programming -- I believe this will do you the world of good.

share|improve this answer

The problem with this lies in the push function:

      top.setNext(top);
      top.setElement(val);

You are setting top's next element to itself, instead of making a new node. Therefore, when you set the element to val, you are overwriting the previous value of val.

To put it simply, top is now pointing to top in a one-node loop. Instead, you should create a new node, like so:

Node new_top = new Node(val); 
new_top.setNext(top);
top = new_top;

This creates a new node, populates it with the pushed value, sets its next pointer to the previous top of the stack, and overwrites your pointer to the top of the stack with a pointer to it, instead.

Credit to Jason via these comments, beware that there will be an empty node in the stack unless you modify the push logic further. Essentially, simply move the counter increment inside the conditional statement, so that the counter is incremented after a node has been placed.

You should probably rewrite that logic, may even be worth removing the node creation in the constructor and doing everything in the push function.

share|improve this answer
    
Omg! I can't believe I missed this. Thanks! –  user3495690 Apr 3 at 22:04
    
Thanks to Zyn below: beware the if statement as well - it works when counter == 0, but you probably wouldn't want the top value getting overwritten when counter == size, as it does. –  omgz0r Apr 3 at 22:04
    
The code still has a problem: stack contains a node with no element (created in the constructor). –  Jason Apr 3 at 22:11
    
That is by design; pop will return null so long as nothing gets pushed, but now the push function doesn't have to worry about a null top. –  omgz0r Apr 3 at 22:13
    
No, I'm wrong; the counter gets incremented first. Good catch! –  omgz0r Apr 3 at 22:14

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