Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on a functionality related to job scheduling in Java, where I'm required to schedule jobs based on days, weeks, or hours.

I'm running into 2 problems:

  • What is a good representation/library to handle a duration of time (not date)?

  • What is a good library to parse a text representation of time, i.e. 2d 3wk for 3 weeks and 2 days? similary to what JIRA has for their.


I'm thinking this must've been done before, but I can't seem to find the correct word to google it.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The JODA time library http://joda-time.sourceforge.net/ gives some nice Java time functionality. You may have to write some regular expressions to parse the type of text strings you're talking about though.

For scheduling the jobs, the Quartz scheduler http://www.opensymphony.com/quartz/;jsessionid=LDKHONNCOPJC may be useful to you.

share|improve this answer
1  
JODA time seems to be the standard, and it's looking good from the API too. Thanks object and Valentin Rocher, I'll tick Jeff for the most detailed answer. –  John Feb 17 '10 at 23:08

Joda Time is THE reference for handling date in Java.

share|improve this answer
    
I remember using this for an application I made to count the hours I'd have to sleep, which would sit in the system tray and warn me when I was going under my allocated sleep quota :) It was pretty cool and handled everything. –  Chris Dennett Feb 17 '10 at 23:09

Have a look at Quartz, it s a powerful cron like system for Java.

share|improve this answer

You could parse a jira style time string into seconds using Joda time using something like this:

import org.joda.time.format.*;

import org.joda.time.; import java.util.;

public class JiraStyleTimeParser {

public static void main(String[] args)
{
String example = "1h 1m 30s";

MutablePeriod parsedPeriod = new MutablePeriod();

PeriodFormatter formatter = new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
    .appendDays().appendSuffix("d")
    .appendSeparator(" ")
    .appendHours().appendSuffix("h")
    .appendSeparator(" ")
    .appendMinutes().appendSuffix("m")
    .appendSeparator(" ")
    .appendSeconds().appendSuffix("s")
    .printZeroAlways()
    .toFormatter();


PeriodParser parser = new PeriodFormatterBuilder()
    .appendDays().appendSuffix("d")
    .appendSeparator(" ")
    .appendHours().appendSuffix("h")
    .appendSeparator(" ")
    .appendMinutes().appendSuffix("m")
    .appendSeparator(" ")
    .appendSeconds().appendSuffix("s")
    .printZeroAlways()
    .toParser();

int working = parser.parseInto(parsedPeriod, example,0, new Locale("en"));
System.out.println(formatter.print(parsedPeriod));

Duration theduration = parsedPeriod.toPeriod().toStandardDuration();
System.out.println("period in seconds: " + theduration.getStandardSeconds());

}

}

share|improve this answer

The nicest way to use Quartz is probably by using the interface to it that Spring Framework provides, here's a link to the reference manual.

share|improve this answer

have a look at Joda

Joda-Time provides a quality replacement for the Java date and time classes. The design allows for multiple calendar systems, while still providing a simple API. The 'default' calendar is the ISO8601 standard which is used by XML. The Gregorian, Julian, Buddhist, Coptic, Ethiopic and Islamic systems are also included, and we welcome further additions. Supporting classes include time zone, duration, format and parsing.

share|improve this answer
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Craigy Aug 24 '12 at 18:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.