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I have a file (filename.txt) that is in the current working directory. The format of each line is:

ID  name    ancestors

The user will enter 2 or more IDs in the command line argument. For example:

perl program.pl 6 13

and it will obtain the ancestors from 6and 13 and print out the common ancestors. (Bacteria)

My program works for all of the IDs up to ID 43371. If I input IDs that are larger than 43371 it does not work and gives me this error:

Use of uninitialized value $len in substr at test4.pl line 28, <FILE> line 48542.
Use of uninitialized value in substr at test4.pl line 28, <FILE> line 48542.

line 28:

print substr $anc[0], 0, $len;

Here is my code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $a;
my @chunks;
my @anc;
my $temp = '';
my $len;
my $string;
open FILE, "filename.txt";

foreach $a(0 .. $#ARGV){
        while (my $line = <FILE>){
                @chunks = split(/\t/, $line);
                chomp $chunks[0];
                if ($ARGV[$a] == $chunks[0]){
                        push (@anc, $chunks[3]); #stored at chunk[3] because one area is separated by 2 tabs 
                        last;
                }
        }
        seek FILE, 0, 0;
}
$temp ^= $_ for @anc;
$temp ^= $anc[0] if @anc &1;
$temp =~ m[^(\0+)];
$len = length($1);
print substr $anc[0], 0, $len;
print "\n";
close FILE;

first few lines of filename.txt

1   root        other sequences
2   Bacteria    eubacteria  Bacteria
6   Azorhizobium        Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Xanthobacteraceae
7   Azorhizobium caulinodans        Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Alphaproteobacteria; Rhizobiales; Xanthobacteraceae; Azorhizobium
9   Buchnera aphidicola     Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Enterobacteriales; Enterobacteriaceae; Buchnera
10  Cellvibrio      Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadales; Pseudomonadaceae
11  Cellvibrio gilvus       Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Pseudomonadales; Pseudomonadaceae; Cellvibrio
13  Dictyoglomus        Bacteria; Dictyoglomi; Dictyoglomales; Dictyoglomaceae

Edit - I tried running it with the same code Miller posted:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

open my $fh, "taxonomy.txt";

my @anc;

while (<$fh>){
        chomp;
        my @chunks = split /\t/;
        if (grep {$_ == $chunks[0]} @ARGV){
                push @anc, $chunks[3];
        }
}
my $temp = '';
$temp ^= $_ for @anc;
$temp ^= $anc[0] if @anc &1;
if ($temp =~ m[^(\0+)]) {
        my $len = length($1);
        print substr $anc[0], 0, $len;
        print "\n";
}
else {
        warn "Did not find match:(";
}
close $fh;

Input:

perl test5.pl 62763 66968

Output:

Did not find match:( at test5.pl line 26, <$_[...]> line 24271.

Output should be:

Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria;

Data:

62763   Vibrio pectenicida      Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Vibrionales; Vibrionaceae; Vibrio

66968   Legionella sp. J        Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria; Legionellales; Legionellaceae; Legionella
share|improve this question
    
A good habit is to declare your variables close to where you intend to use them, in the smallest scope possible. Otherwise you are just using globals and forsaking much of the benefit of lexical variables. – TLP Apr 4 '14 at 0:46
    
If you don't mind me asking, what is the logic you are attempting with using ^= and substr? If you are just trying to print a certain part of the string, there are much simpler ways. – TLP Apr 4 '14 at 0:55
    
I used ^= and substr because I found a snippet of code that used that to find the common substrings in an array. It is the only way I can currently think of to find the strings. – Mubs123 Apr 4 '14 at 2:17
    
Yes, I see now. Any similarities between the strings will be replaced with \0. It does rely on the fact that the strings are exactly identical. The slightest variation will mess things up. And then length will return undef and cause this problem. So the error is in your filename.txt file. – TLP Apr 4 '14 at 2:45
1  
If you're looking for the intersection, why would this be the answer for 62763 with 66968: Bacteria; Proteobac-teria; Epsilonproteobacteria; Campylobacterales; Helicobacteraceae; Helicobacter? Shouldn't it be Bacteria; Proteobacteria; Gammaproteobacteria;? – Miller Apr 4 '14 at 2:51

This part is problematic because it's possible $1 won't be defined:

$temp =~ m[^(\0+)];
$len = length($1);
print substr $anc[0], 0, $len;

Always verify that a regular expression matches before trying to use a captured variable:

if ($temp =~ m[^(\0+)]) {
    $len = length($1);
    print substr $anc[0], 0, $len;
} else {
    warn "Didn't match :(";
}

For extra credit, I'd advise you to follow TLP's advise and limit the scope of all of your variables. Doing that and quite a few other enhancements leads to the following code which is mostly untested:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

open my $fh, "filename.txt";

my @anc;

while (<$fh>){
    chomp;
    my @chunks = split /\t/;
    if (grep {$_ == $chunks[0]} @ARGV){
        # Let's output some debugging info and make sure things work as intended.
        print "$chunks[0] - $chunks[3]\n";
        push @anc, $chunks[3]; #stored at chunk[3] because one area is separated by 2 tabs 
    }
}

close $fh;

my $intersection = shift @anc;
for (@anc) {
    my $overlap = $intersection ^ $_;
    $overlap =~ m/^(\0*)/;
    $intersection = substr $intersection, 0, length $1;
}

print "$intersection\n";

Update

As a final version of your cleaned up intersection code, I've created the following:

my $intersection = shift @anc;
for (@anc) {
    my $overlap = $intersection ^ $_;
    $overlap =~ m/^(\0*)/;
    $intersection = substr $intersection, 0, length $1;
}

Note, the key difference is that the regex uses * instead of + so that it will always match.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just so you know, using a newline at the end of warn and die has a hidden function: It suppresses the line number. – TLP Apr 4 '14 at 0:52
1  
@TLP Heh, I was observing that functionality today actually, but didn't question it enough to figure out why. Thanks for the tip ;) – Miller Apr 4 '14 at 0:54
    
If I try running this code with a number greater than 43371 as input, it still doesn't give me the correct result(it gives me the warning). I tried it with 2 numbers that I know should work and I know the results it should give me, but it isn't correct. Every number smaller than 43371 works. – Mubs123 Apr 4 '14 at 2:21
    
What is the warning that it gives you? – Miller Apr 4 '14 at 2:22
1  
@Mubs123 Perhaps your sample data should include sets with numbers that cause this failure. – TLP Apr 4 '14 at 2:34

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