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What is the quickest way to find the first character which only appears once in a string?

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1  
In what language? – SLaks Feb 18 '10 at 0:43
4  
Irrespective of language – Thunderhashy Feb 18 '10 at 0:51
2  
Homework question? – DVK Feb 18 '10 at 0:54
3  
are you talking about consecutive repetition, or simply if a character appears more than once in the string? – Agent_9191 Feb 18 '10 at 1:06
2  
Isn't the very first character always the first that isn't repeated, since there's no characters for it to be a repeat of? – tylerl Feb 18 '10 at 1:20

32 Answers 32

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can't know that the character is un-repeated until you've processed the whole string, so my suggestion would be this:

def first_non_repeated_character(string):
  chars = []
  repeated = []
  for character in string:
    if character in chars:
      chars.remove(character)
      repeated.append(character)
    else:
      if not character in repeated:
        chars.append(character)
  if len(chars):
    return chars[0]
  else:
    return False

Edit: originally posted code was bad, but this latest snippet is Certified To Work On Ryan's Computer™.

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1  
Erm... first_non_repeated_character('aaab') == 'a' – Mark Byers Feb 18 '10 at 0:50
1  
This algorithm is O(n), and won't use much memory as few characters will be stored in either chars or repeated at any given time. That makes it decent-ish in my book. However, if you have a seriously long string to check, the algorithm could be massively parallelized with little extra code or worry. – Ryan Prior Feb 18 '10 at 0:58
3  
I think your code works correctly now. A note about performace: testing if an element is in a list is O(m) where m is the length of the list. With a long unicode string with lots of different repeated characters, the character in repeated will become slow as repeated contains more and more elements. – Mark Byers Feb 18 '10 at 1:05
1  
It isn't a true O(n^2) runtime unless you assume an unlimited number of potential characters. The largest set of characters I know of is Unicode, which according to this page[1] contains 234,803 designated code points. The runtime is O(n^2) so long as n<234,803; but that's not the same as having a o(n^2) algorithm runtime, because once you run out of characters, the runtime stops growing exponentially. [1] i18nguy.com/unicode/char-count.html – Ryan Prior Jun 13 '13 at 21:57

It has to be at least O(n) because you don't know if a character will be repeated until you've read all characters.

So you can iterate over the characters and append each character to a list the first time you see it, and separately keep a count of how many times you've seen it (in fact the only values that matter for the count is "0", "1" or "more than 1").

When you reach the end of the string you just have to find the first character in the list that has a count of exactly one.


Example code in Python:

def first_non_repeated_character(s):
    counts = defaultdict(int)
    l = []
    for c in s:
        counts[c] += 1
        if counts[c] == 1:
            l.append(c)

    for c in l:
        if counts[c] == 1:
            return c

    return None

This runs in O(n).

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Why not use a heap based data structure such as a minimum priority queue. As you read each character from the string, add it to the queue with a priority based on the location in the string and the number of occurrences so far. You could modify the queue to add priorities on collision so that the priority of a character is the sum of the number appearances of that character. At the end of the loop, the first element in the queue will be the least frequent character in the string and if there are multiple characters with a count == 1, the first element was the first unique character added to the queue.

share|improve this answer

Here is another fun way to do it. Counter requires Python2.7 or Python3.1

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> def first_non_repeated_character(s):
...     return min((k for k,v in Counter(s).items() if v<2), key=s.index)
...
>>> first_non_repeated_character("aaabbbcddd")
'c'
>>> first_non_repeated_character("aaaebbbcddd")
'e'
share|improve this answer

Lots of answers are attempting O(n) but are forgetting the actual costs of inserting and removing from the lists/associative arrays/sets they're using to track.

If you can assume that a char is a single byte, then you use a simple array indexed by the char and keep a count in it. This is truly O(n) because the array accesses are guaranteed O(1), and the final pass over the array to find the first element with 1 is constant time (because the array has a small, fixed size).

If you can't assume that a char is a single byte, then I would propose sorting the string and then doing a single pass checking adjacent values. This would be O(n log n) for the sort plus O(n) for the final pass. So it's effectively O(n log n), which is better than O(n^2). Also, it has virtually no space overhead, which is another problem with many of the answers that are attempting O(n).

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Counter requires Python2.7 or Python3.1

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> def first_non_repeated_character(s):
...     counts = Counter(s)
...     for c in s:
...         if counts[c]==1:
...             return c
...     return None
... 
>>> first_non_repeated_character("aaabbbcddd")
'c'
>>> first_non_repeated_character("aaaebbbcddd")
'e'
share|improve this answer

Refactoring a solution proposed earlier (not having to use extra list/memory). This goes over the string twice. So this takes O(n) too like the original solution.

def first_non_repeated_character(s):
    counts = defaultdict(int)
    for c in s:
        counts[c] += 1
    for c in s:
        if counts[c] == 1:
            return c
    return None
share|improve this answer

I think this should do it in C. This operates in O(n) time with no ambiguity about order of insertion and deletion operators. This is a counting sort (simplest form of a bucket sort, which itself is the simple form of a radix sort).

unsigned char find_first_unique(unsigned char *string)
{
    int chars[256];
    int i=0;
    memset(chars, 0, sizeof(chars));

    while (string[i++])
    {
        chars[string[i]]++;
    }

    i = 0;
    while (string[i++])
    {
        if (chars[string[i]] == 1) return string[i];
    }
    return 0;
}
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1  
Instead of returning i, it should return string[i], in that second while loop. – jasper77 Dec 3 '12 at 18:57
def first_non_repeated_character(string):
  chars = []
  repeated = []
  for character in string:
    if character in repeated:
        ... discard it.
    else if character in chars:
      chars.remove(character)
      repeated.append(character)
    else:
      if not character in repeated:
        chars.append(character)
  if len(chars):
    return chars[0]
  else:
    return False
share|improve this answer

The following is a Ruby implementation of finding the first nonrepeated character of a string:

def first_non_repeated_character(string)
  string1 = string.split('')
  string2 = string.split('')

  string1.each do |let1|
    counter = 0
    string2.each do |let2|
      if let1 == let2
        counter+=1
      end
    end
  if counter == 1 
    return let1
    break
  end
end
end

p first_non_repeated_character('dont doddle in the forest')

And here is a JavaScript implementation of the same style function:

var first_non_repeated_character = function (string) {
  var string1 = string.split('');
  var string2 = string.split('');

  var single_letters = [];

  for (var i = 0; i < string1.length; i++) {
    var count = 0;
    for (var x = 0; x < string2.length; x++) {
      if (string1[i] == string2[x]) {
        count++
      }
    }
    if (count == 1) {
      return string1[i];
    }
  }
}

console.log(first_non_repeated_character('dont doddle in the forest'));
console.log(first_non_repeated_character('how are you today really?'));

In both cases I used a counter knowing that if the letter is not matched anywhere in the string, it will only occur in the string once so I just count it's occurrence.

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Other JavaScript solutions are quite c-style solutions here is a more JavaScript-style solution.

var arr = string.split("");
var occurences = {};
var tmp;
var lowestindex = string.length+1;

arr.forEach( function(c){ 
  tmp = c;
  if( typeof occurences[tmp] == "undefined")
    occurences[tmp] = tmp;
  else 
    occurences[tmp] += tmp;
});


for(var p in occurences) {
  if(occurences[p].length == 1)
    lowestindex = Math.min(lowestindex, string.indexOf(p));
}

if(lowestindex > string.length)
  return null;

return string[lowestindex];

}
share|improve this answer
2  
String.indexOf() searches through the string from left to right, you can consult Mark Byers'answer. You can look at this codepen also: codepen.io/anon/pen/awHlq – yoneal Jul 18 '14 at 7:56

in C, this is almost Shlemiel the Painter's Algorithm (not quite O(n!) but more than 0(n2)).

But will outperform "better" algorithms for reasonably sized strings because O is so small. This can also easily tell you the location of the first non-repeating string.

char FirstNonRepeatedChar(char * psz)
{
   for (int ii = 0; psz[ii] != 0; ++ii)
   {
      for (int jj = ii+1; ; ++jj)
      {
         // if we hit the end of string, then we found a non-repeat character.
         //
         if (psz[jj] == 0)
            return psz[ii]; // this character doesn't repeat

         // if we found a repeat character, we can stop looking.
         //
         if (psz[ii] == psz[jj])
            break; 
      }
   }

   return 0; // there were no non-repeating characters.
}

edit: this code is assuming you don't mean consecutive repeating characters.

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In Ruby:

(Original Credit: Andrew A. Smith)

x = "a huge string in which some characters repeat"

def first_unique_character(s)
 s.each_char.detect { |c| s.count(c) == 1 }
end

first_unique_character(x)
=> "u"
share|improve this answer

Here's an implementation in Perl (version >=5.10) that doesn't care whether the repeated characters are consecutive or not:

use strict;
use warnings;

foreach my $word(@ARGV)
{
  my @distinct_chars;
  my %char_counts;

  my @chars=split(//,$word);

  foreach (@chars)
  {
    push @distinct_chars,$_ unless $_~~@distinct_chars;
    $char_counts{$_}++;
  }

  my $first_non_repeated="";

  foreach(@distinct_chars)
  {
    if($char_counts{$_}==1)
    {
      $first_non_repeated=$_;
      last;
    }
  }

  if(length($first_non_repeated))
  {
    print "For \"$word\", the first non-repeated character is '$first_non_repeated'.\n";
  }
  else
  {
    print "All characters in \"$word\" are repeated.\n";
  }
}

Storing this code in a script (which I named non_repeated.pl) and running it on a few inputs produces:

jmaney> perl non_repeated.pl aabccd "a huge string in which some characters repeat" abcabc
For "aabccd", the first non-repeated character is 'b'.
For "a huge string in which some characters repeat", the first non-repeated character is 'u'.
All characters in "abcabc" are repeated.
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Here's a possible solution in ruby without using Array#detect (as in this answer). Using Array#detect makes it too easy, I think.

ALPHABET = %w(a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z)

def fnr(s)
  unseen_chars    = ALPHABET.dup
  seen_once_chars = []
  s.each_char do |c|
    if unseen_chars.include?(c)
      unseen_chars.delete(c)
      seen_once_chars << c
    elsif seen_once_chars.include?(c)
      seen_once_chars.delete(c)
    end
  end

  seen_once_chars.first
end

Seems to work for some simple examples:

fnr "abcdabcegghh"
# => "d"

fnr "abababababababaqababa"                                    
=> "q"

Suggestions and corrections are very much appreciated!

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Try this code:

    public static String findFirstUnique(String str)
    {
        String unique = "";

        foreach (char ch in str)
        {
            if (unique.Contains(ch)) unique=unique.Replace(ch.ToString(), "");
            else unique += ch.ToString();
        }
        return unique[0].ToString();
    }
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In Mathematica one might write this:

string = "conservationist deliberately treasures analytical";

Cases[Gather @ Characters @ string, {_}, 1, 1][[1]]
{"v"}
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This snippet code in JavaScript

var string = "tooth";
var hash = [];
for(var i=0; j=string.length, i<j; i++){
    if(hash[string[i]] !== undefined){
        hash[string[i]] = hash[string[i]] + 1;
    }else{
        hash[string[i]] = 1;
    }
}

for(i=0; j=string.length, i<j; i++){
    if(hash[string[i]] === 1){
        console.info( string[i] );
        return false;
    }
}
// prints "h"
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Different approach here. scan each element in the string and create a count array which stores the repetition count of each element. Next time again start from first element in the array and print the first occurrence of element with count = 1

C code 
-----
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char t_c;
    char *t_p = argv[1] ;
    char count[128]={'\0'};
    char ch;

    for(t_c = *(argv[1]); t_c != '\0'; t_c = *(++t_p))
        count[t_c]++;
    t_p = argv[1];
    for(t_c = *t_p; t_c != '\0'; t_c = *(++t_p))
    {
        if(count[t_c] == 1)
        {
            printf("Element is %c\n",t_c);
            break;
        }
    }

return 0;    
} 
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input is = aabbcddeef output is = c

char FindUniqueChar(char *a)
{
    int i=0;
    bool repeat=false;
    while(a[i] != '\0')
    {
      if (a[i] == a[i+1])
      {
        repeat = true;
      }
      else
      {
            if(!repeat)
            {
            cout<<a[i];
            return a[i];
            }
        repeat=false;
      }
      i++;
    }
    return a[i];
}
share|improve this answer

Here is another approach...we could have a array which will store the count and the index of the first occurrence of the character. After filling up the array we could jst traverse the array and find the MINIMUM index whose count is 1 then return str[index]

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <climits>
using namespace std;

#define No_of_chars 256

//store the count and the index where the char first appear
typedef struct countarray
{
    int count;
    int index;
}countarray;

//returns the count array
    countarray *getcountarray(char *str)
    {
        countarray *count;
        count=new countarray[No_of_chars];
        for(int i=0;i<No_of_chars;i++)
        {
            count[i].count=0;
            count[i].index=-1;
        }
        for(int i=0;*(str+i);i++)
        {
            (count[*(str+i)].count)++;
            if(count[*(str+i)].count==1) //if count==1 then update the index
                count[*(str+i)].index=i; 

        }
        return count;
    }

    char firstnonrepeatingchar(char *str)
    {
        countarray *array;
        array = getcountarray(str);
        int result = INT_MAX;
        for(int i=0;i<No_of_chars;i++)
        {
            if(array[i].count==1 && result > array[i].index)
                result = array[i].index;
        }
        delete[] (array);
        return (str[result]);
    }

    int main()
    {
        char str[] = "geeksforgeeks";
        cout<<"First non repeating character is "<<firstnonrepeatingchar(str)<<endl;        
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer

Function:

This c# function uses a HashTable (Dictionary) and have a performance O(2n) worstcase.

private static string FirstNoRepeatingCharacter(string aword)
    {
        Dictionary<string, int> dic = new Dictionary<string, int>();            

        for (int i = 0; i < aword.Length; i++)
        {
            if (!dic.ContainsKey(aword.Substring(i, 1)))
                dic.Add(aword.Substring(i, 1), 1);
            else
                dic[aword.Substring(i, 1)]++;
        }

        foreach (var item in dic)
        {
            if (item.Value == 1) return item.Key;
        }
        return string.Empty;
    }

Example:

string aword = "TEETER";

Console.WriteLine(FirstNoRepeatingCharacter(aword)); //print: R

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I have two strings i.e. 'unique' and 'repeated'. Every character appearing for the first time, gets added to 'unique'. If it is repeated for the second time, it gets removed from 'unique' and added to 'repeated'. This way, we will always have a string of unique characters in 'unique'. Complexity big O(n)

public void firstUniqueChar(String str){
    String unique= "";
    String repeated = "";
    str = str.toLowerCase();
    for(int i=0; i<str.length();i++){
        char ch = str.charAt(i);
        if(!(repeated.contains(str.subSequence(i, i+1))))
            if(unique.contains(str.subSequence(i, i+1))){
                unique = unique.replaceAll(Character.toString(ch), "");
                repeated = repeated+ch;
            }
            else
                unique = unique+ch;
    }
    System.out.println(unique.charAt(0));
}
share|improve this answer

The following code is in C# with complexity of n.

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace SomethingDigital
{
    class FirstNonRepeatingChar
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            String input = "geeksforgeeksandgeeksquizfor";
            char[] str = input.ToCharArray();

            bool[] b = new bool[256];
            String unique1 = "";
            String unique2 = "";

            foreach (char ch in str)
            {
                if (!unique1.Contains(ch))
                {
                    unique1 = unique1 + ch;
                    unique2 = unique2 + ch;
                }
                else
                {
                    unique2 = unique2.Replace(ch.ToString(), "");
                }
            }
            if (unique2 != "")
            {
                Console.WriteLine(unique2[0].ToString());
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("No non repeated string");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The following solution is an elegant way to find the first unique character within a string using the new features which have been introduced as part as Java 8. This solution uses the approach of first creating a map to count the number of occurrences of each character. It then uses this map to find the first character which occurs only once. This runs in O(N) time.

import static java.util.stream.Collectors.counting;
import static java.util.stream.Collectors.groupingBy;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

// Runs in O(N) time and uses lambdas and the stream API from Java 8
//   Also, it is only three lines of code!
private static String findFirstUniqueCharacterPerformantWithLambda(String inputString) {
  // convert the input string into a list of characters
  final List<String> inputCharacters = Arrays.asList(inputString.split(""));

  // first, construct a map to count the number of occurrences of each character
  final Map<Object, Long> characterCounts = inputCharacters
    .stream()
    .collect(groupingBy(s -> s, counting()));

  // then, find the first unique character by consulting the count map
  return inputCharacters
    .stream()
    .filter(s -> characterCounts.get(s) == 1)
    .findFirst()
    .orElse(null);
}
share|improve this answer

Here is one more solution with o(n) time complexity.

public void findUnique(String string) {
    ArrayList<Character> uniqueList = new ArrayList<>();
    int[] chatArr = new int[128];
    for (int i = 0; i < string.length(); i++) {
        Character ch = string.charAt(i);
        if (chatArr[ch] != -1) {
            chatArr[ch] = -1;
            uniqueList.add(ch);
        } else {
            uniqueList.remove(ch);
        }
    }
    if (uniqueList.size() == 0) {
        System.out.println("No unique character found!");
    } else {
        System.out.println("First unique character is :" + uniqueList.get(0));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

how about using a suffix tree for this case... the first unrepeated character will be first character of longest suffix string with least depth in tree..

share|improve this answer

Create Two list -

  1. unique list - having only unique character .. UL
  2. non-unique list - having only repeated character -NUL
  for(char c in str) {
    if(nul.contains(c)){
     //do nothing
    }else if(ul.contains(c)){
      ul.remove(c);
      nul.add(c);
    }else{
       nul.add(c);
    }
share|improve this answer
Another answer(Might not be so efficient but a kind of approach that we can try in c++; Time complexity:O(n) Space complexity:O(n)).

char FirstNotRepeatingCharInString(char *str)
{
    //Lets assume a set  to insert chars of string
    char result;
    multiset<char> st;
    for(int i=0;i<strlen(str);i++)
    {
        st.insert(str[i]);  
    }
    for(int i=0;i<strlen(str);i++)
    {
        if(st.count(str[i]) <=1){
            result = str[i];
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer

If the char array contains repeating characters contiguously (eg. "ggddaaccceefgg) then following code would work:

char FirstNonRepeatingChar(char* str)
{
     int i=0;
     bool repeat = false;
     while(str[i]!='\0')
     {
       if(str[i] != str[i+1])
       {
         if(!repeat)
           return(str[i]);
         repeat = false;
       }
       else
        repeat = true;
      i++;
    }
return ' ';
}
share|improve this answer

protected by Andrew Barber Jan 4 '15 at 7:50

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