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So I would like to use function localtime(), but I'm having problems with getting first and last day of last month properly. Right now I have working functionality, but I bet there is a better way to solve this.

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

$start_of_month = localtime();

while($start_of_month->mday < 10) {
    $start_of_month += ONE_DAY;
}

$start_of_month -= ONE_MONTH; # Subtract one month to get previous month. "ONE_MONTH" is defined by Time::Seconds

$end_of_month = $start_of_month; # Copy start_of_month to end_of_month as they both have same year and month.

# Subtract day from $start_of_month until mday is the first day of the month.
while($start_of_month->mday != 1) {
    $start_of_month -= ONE_DAY;
}

# Silly workaround to bring $end_of_month to last day of the month as Time::Piece object   does not have good way to change mday.
while($end_of_month->mday != $start_of_month->month_last_day) {
    $end_of_month += ONE_DAY;
}

$period_start = $start_of_month->dmy("."); # End result has to be same!

Can anyone give me a better way of handling this?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you looked at DateTime module? –  Neil Slater Apr 4 at 7:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't rely on Time::Piece and constants in Time::Seconds for date manipulation

The following was my suggested simplification of the OP's date manipulation using Time::Piece and Time::Seconds. IF this worked on overloaded operators, it might actually work as intended, but as ikegami pointed out, this isn't guaranteed. So I tested below.

If you want to go the math route, at least you could simplify things a little:

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

my $date_start = localtime();
$date_start -= ONE_MONTH;
$date_start -= ($date_start->mday - 1) * ONE_DAY;

my $date_end =  $date_start + ($date_start->month_last_day - 1) * ONE_DAY;

print $date_start , "\n"; # Prints Mar 1st (at least today it does)
print $date_end , "\n"; # Prints Mar 31st 

I'd consider using a different module for this, like Date::Calc or DateTime, but this might work for your purposes.

Testing the above solution - many failures

I created a script the below script that loops through every date for a year starting at January 15th, showing every range where the above code does not work as expected.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;
use Time::Seconds;

my $t = 1389812400;      # Wed 2014-Jan-15 7pm GMT.  11am PST
my $t_max = 1421348400;  # Thu 2015-Jan-15 7pm GMT.  11am PST

my %prev_month = map {$_ => ($_ - 1) || 12} (1..12);

my $fail = '';
while ($t <= $t_max) {
    $t += 60; # Increment by 1 minute

    # Testing potentially overloaded math of Time::Piece & Time::Seconds
    my $start = my $src = localtime($t);
    $start -= ONE_MONTH;
    $start -= ($start->mday - 1) * ONE_DAY;

    if ($start->mon != $prev_month{$src->mon}) {
        print "From ($t) $src -> $start\n" if !$fail;
        $fail = "  To ($t) $src -> $start\n\n";

    } elsif ($fail) {
        print $fail;
        $fail = '';
    }
}

The below is the output of this script with comments inserted to explain why each range fails:

# ONE_MONTH is exactly 2_629_744 seconds, or 30.437 days.
# ONE_MONTH is too short for January
From (1391193000) Fri Jan 31 10:30:00 2014 -> Wed Jan  1 00:00:56 2014
  To (1391241540) Fri Jan 31 23:59:00 2014 -> Wed Jan  1 13:29:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too long for February
From (1393660800) Sat Mar  1 00:00:00 2014 -> Wed Jan  1 13:30:56 2014
  To (1393871340) Mon Mar  3 10:29:00 2014 -> Wed Jan  1 23:59:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too short for March
From (1396290600) Mon Mar 31 11:30:00 2014 -> Sat Mar  1 00:00:56 2014
  To (1396335540) Mon Mar 31 23:59:00 2014 -> Sat Mar  1 12:29:56 2014

# ONE_DAY is 86_400 seconds, or 24 hours.
# March 9th is only 23 hours long due to DST, ONE_DAY goes to far.
From (1397064600) Wed Apr  9 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397068140) Wed Apr  9 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397151000) Thu Apr 10 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397154540) Thu Apr 10 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397237400) Fri Apr 11 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397240940) Fri Apr 11 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397323800) Sat Apr 12 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397327340) Sat Apr 12 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397410200) Sun Apr 13 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397413740) Sun Apr 13 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397496600) Mon Apr 14 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397500140) Mon Apr 14 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397583000) Tue Apr 15 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397586540) Tue Apr 15 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397669400) Wed Apr 16 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397672940) Wed Apr 16 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397755800) Thu Apr 17 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397759340) Thu Apr 17 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397842200) Fri Apr 18 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397845740) Fri Apr 18 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1397928600) Sat Apr 19 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1397932140) Sat Apr 19 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398015000) Sun Apr 20 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398018540) Sun Apr 20 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398101400) Mon Apr 21 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398104940) Mon Apr 21 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398187800) Tue Apr 22 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398191340) Tue Apr 22 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398274200) Wed Apr 23 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398277740) Wed Apr 23 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398360600) Thu Apr 24 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398364140) Thu Apr 24 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398447000) Fri Apr 25 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398450540) Fri Apr 25 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398533400) Sat Apr 26 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398536940) Sat Apr 26 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398619800) Sun Apr 27 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398623340) Sun Apr 27 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398706200) Mon Apr 28 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398709740) Mon Apr 28 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398792600) Tue Apr 29 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398796140) Tue Apr 29 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

From (1398879000) Wed Apr 30 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:00:56 2014
  To (1398882540) Wed Apr 30 11:29:00 2014 -> Fri Feb 28 23:59:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too long for April
From (1398927600) Thu May  1 00:00:00 2014 -> Sat Mar  1 12:30:56 2014
  To (1398965340) Thu May  1 10:29:00 2014 -> Sat Mar  1 22:59:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too short for May
From (1401557400) Sat May 31 10:30:00 2014 -> Thu May  1 00:00:56 2014
  To (1401605940) Sat May 31 23:59:00 2014 -> Thu May  1 13:29:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too long for June
From (1404198000) Tue Jul  1 00:00:00 2014 -> Thu May  1 13:30:56 2014
  To (1404235740) Tue Jul  1 10:29:00 2014 -> Thu May  1 23:59:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too short for July
From (1406827800) Thu Jul 31 10:30:00 2014 -> Tue Jul  1 00:00:56 2014
  To (1406876340) Thu Jul 31 23:59:00 2014 -> Tue Jul  1 13:29:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too short for August
From (1409506200) Sun Aug 31 10:30:00 2014 -> Fri Aug  1 00:00:56 2014
  To (1409554740) Sun Aug 31 23:59:00 2014 -> Fri Aug  1 13:29:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too long for September
From (1412146800) Wed Oct  1 00:00:00 2014 -> Fri Aug  1 13:30:56 2014
  To (1412184540) Wed Oct  1 10:29:00 2014 -> Fri Aug  1 23:59:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too short for October
From (1414776600) Fri Oct 31 10:30:00 2014 -> Wed Oct  1 00:00:56 2014
  To (1414825140) Fri Oct 31 23:59:00 2014 -> Wed Oct  1 13:29:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too long for November
From (1417420800) Mon Dec  1 00:00:00 2014 -> Wed Oct  1 14:30:56 2014
  To (1417454940) Mon Dec  1 09:29:00 2014 -> Wed Oct  1 23:59:56 2014

# ONE_MONTH is too short for December
From (1420050600) Wed Dec 31 10:30:00 2014 -> Mon Dec  1 00:00:56 2014
  To (1420099140) Wed Dec 31 23:59:00 2014 -> Mon Dec  1 13:29:56 2014

Alternative using Time::Piece->add_months? Nope

Time::Piece has two functions, add_months and add_years intended for date calculations. Unfortunately, the documentation states:

Note that there is some "strange" behaviour when adding and subtracting months at the ends of months. Generally when the resulting month is shorter than the starting month then the number of overlap days is added. For example subtracting a month from 2008-03-31 will not result in 2008-02-31 as this is an impossible date. Instead you will get 2008-03-02. This appears to be consistent with other date manipulation tools.

The below code fully demonstrates this behavior for the timezone PST.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;

my $t = localtime(1420012800);

print $t->add_months($_),"\n" for (0..12)

Output:

Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 2014
Sat Jan 31 00:00:00 2015
Tue Mar  3 00:00:00 2015
Tue Mar 31 00:00:00 2015
Fri May  1 00:00:00 2015
Sun May 31 00:00:00 2015
Wed Jul  1 00:00:00 2015
Fri Jul 31 00:00:00 2015
Mon Aug 31 00:00:00 2015
Thu Oct  1 00:00:00 2015
Sat Oct 31 00:00:00 2015
Tue Dec  1 00:00:00 2015
Thu Dec 31 00:00:00 2015

Now, it is kind of nice how this function is able to accurately cycle back to the same date a year later, but there are lots of unfavorable months until then.

Conclusion

The constants in Time::Seconds are just that, constants. They are exact numbers of seconds meant to represent periods of time. There is no operator overloading to facilitate fancy date manipulation. Instead, these values are simply good for mathematical comparisons.

To manipulate specific dates, I'd advise using Date::Calc, DateTime, or any of the other modules suggested in this question.

share|improve this answer
    
Updated a code a bit (added $date_end) as well. I hope you don't mind, but clever thinking. Never thought to multiply by constants. Big thanks! –  R.P Apr 4 at 7:35
    
@R.P, Multiplying by a constant would give the wrong result because not all days are the same length. However, because of the use of objects with overloaded operators, "*" doesn't always perform multiplication when Time::Piece is involved; sometimes, it does the right thing instead. Is this one of those times? I don't know. I HATE Time::Piece because it's so damn hard to know if code using it correct or not. I can't tell if Miller's code will work year-round. –  ikegami Apr 4 at 14:15
    
@ikegami Please confirm my testing and conclusion at your convenience. –  Miller Apr 7 at 2:18
    
@R.P Please observe my revised answer. –  Miller Apr 7 at 2:19
    
The add_months behaviour is not a problem in this case. Just set the day to 1 before subtracting the month. –  ikegami Apr 7 at 2:27

A less OO, but alternate solution:

use POSIX qw(mktime);
my @now = localtime;

# mday = 1, month = month - 1
my $date_start = mktime(@now[0 .. 2], 1, $now[4] - 1, @now[5 .. 8]);

# mday = 0, the 0th day of this month == last day of prior month
my $date_end   = mktime(@now[0 .. 2], 0, @now[4 .. 8]);

print scalar localtime $date_start, "\n";
print scalar localtime $date_end, "\n";

This hiccups with daylight saving time; if you don't care about time-of-day you could set $now[2] to 12 noon and hope no country declares night to be day and day to be night:

my @now = (0, 0, 12, (localtime)[3..8]);
share|improve this answer

I don't trust code that uses Time::Piece. It relies on overloading operators to make it look like you're doing it wrong ($time += ONE_DAY; looks like you're adding a constant) when you're actually doing it right. Maybe. It's hard to tell. You must have intimate knowledge of the guts of the module to know if you're doing it right.

DateTime solution:

my $dt = DateTime
   ->now( time_zone => 'local' )
   ->set_time_zone('floating')  # Do this when you want to date arithmetic.
   ->truncate( to => 'day' );

$dt->set( day => 1 )->subtract( days => 1 );
my $last = $dt->ymd('-');

$dt->set( day => 1 );
my $first = $dt->ymd('-');

say "$first .. $last";
share|improve this answer
    
Note: You might be tempted to use DateTime->today( time_zone => 'local' ), but it fails in at least two time zones on certain days (since those days have no midnight because of DST changes). –  ikegami Apr 7 at 2:40
    
Updated solution so it gives first and last, not just first. –  ikegami Apr 7 at 2:40

Sorry if I did not understood property but: DaysInMonth (check coment)

my @monthDays= qw( 31 28 31 30 31 30 31 31 30 31 30 31 );
sub MonthDays {
    my $month= shift(@_);
    my $year= @_ ? shift(@_) : 1900+(localtime())[5];
    if(  $year <= 1752  ) {
        # Note:  Although September 1752 only had 19 days,
        # they were numbered 1,2,14..30!
        return 19   if  1752 == $year  &&  9 == $month;
        return 29   if  2 == $month  &&  0 == $year % 4;
    } else {
        return 29   if  2 == $month  and
          0 == $year%4  &&  0 != $year%100  ||  0 == $year%400;
    }
    return $monthDays[$month-1];
}

If you wish easy data to seconds then take look Time::Local

$time = timelocal( $sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year );
share|improve this answer

Using the Time::Seconds definition of ONE_MONTH gives you a solution that is wrong for several days a year. It is the average length of a month in seconds, and is equal to about 30.4 days. Subtracting that from 1 March, for instance, gives you a date in late January.

However the first day of the previous month can be calculated simply from the month and day fields returned by localtime. Converting this into a Time::Piece object lets us calculate the last day of the same month.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;

my ($m, $y) = (localtime)[4,5];
$y += 1900;
if ($m == 0) {
  $m = 11;
  $y -= 1;
}

my $period_start = sprintf '%02d.%02d.%04d', 1, $m, $y;
my $period_end = do {
  my $tp = Time::Piece->strptime($period_start, '%d.%m.%Y');
  sprintf '%02d.%02d.%04d', $tp->month_last_day, $m, $y;
};

print $period_start, "\n";
print $period_end, "\n";

output

01.03.2014
31.03.2014
share|improve this answer
    
I won't downvote this as any idea is better than none, but this caused a bug on first of February. That's why I had to make quick fix that I showed in question. –  R.P Apr 8 at 15:57
    
Thanks for letting me know. There was a bug where the current month is January, which I have fixed, but I can't see anything wrong with February. The code takes no notice of the current day of the month, and if I set ($m, $y) = (1, 2014) for February I get 01.01.2014 and 31.01.2014 –  Borodin Apr 8 at 20:40

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