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I would like to substitute each element in an array with their corresponding hash values. To make it more clear: I have two files 1) ref.tab 2) data.tab. The reference file contains data like:

A   a
B   b
C   c
D   d

The data file contains data like:

1   apple   red A
2   orange  orange  B
3   grapes  black   C
4   kiwi    green   D

What I would like to do now using perl is: substitute all instances of values in column 4 of data.tab with the corresponding values from ref.tab.

My code is as follows:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use diagnostics;

# Define file containing the reference values:
open DFILE, 'ref.tab' or die "Cannot open data file";

# Store each column to an array: 
my @caps; 
my @small;
while(<DFILE>) {
    my @tmp = split/\t/;
    push @caps,$tmp[0];
    push @small,$tmp[1];
}
print join(' ', @caps),"\n";
print join(' ', @small),"\n";

# convert individual arrays to hashes:
my %replaceid;
@replaceid{@caps} = @small;

print "$_ $replaceid{$_}\n" for (keys %replaceid);

# Define the file in which column values are to be replaced:
open SFILE,'output.tab' or die "Cannot open source file"; 

# Store the required columns in an array:
my @col4;
while(<SFILE>) {
    my @tmp1 = split/\t/;
    push @col4,$tmp1[4];
}

for $_ (0..$#col4) {
    if ($_ = keys $replaceid[$col4[$_]]){
        ~s/$_/values $replaceid[$col4[$_]]/g;
    }
}


print "@col4";
close (DFILE);
close (SFILE);
exit;

The above program results in this error:

Use of uninitialized value $tmp1[3] in join or string at replace.pl line 4. 

Could you please help me out with a solution? I am new to Perl and would be great if you could give the answer along with the explanation.

New issue:

Another issue now. I would like to leave the field blank if there is no respective replacement. Any idea on how this could be done? ie:

ref.tab

A   a
B   b
C   c
D   d
F   f

data.tab:

1   apple   red A
2   orange  orange  B
3   grapes  black   C
4   kiwi    green   D
5   melon   yellow  E
6   citron   green  F

desired output:

1   apple   red a
2   orange  orange  b
3   grapes  black   c
4   kiwi    green   d
5   melon   yellow  
6   citron   green  f

Please help!!

New issue:2

Sorry for the trouble again. I have another issue now with the awk solution. It does leave the field blank if there is no match, but I have additional columns after the 4th; so whenever there is no match found, the value in the fifth column gets shifted to the fourth column.

1 apple red a sweet 
2 orange orange b sour 
3 grapes black c sweet 
4 kiwi green d sweet 
5 melon yellow sweet  
6 citron green f sour

on line 5: Here you can notice what happens; the value in 5th column gets shifted to the 4th column where there is no replacement found.

share|improve this question
1  
Don't say "I got an error". Always say "Here is the error I got" and then show us the exact error. Don't paraphrase it. Don't retype it. Cut & paste the error message exactly from your screen. –  Andy Lester Apr 4 '14 at 15:01
    
@AndyLester: Thank you for the correction. I will follow it next time! :-) –  biobudhan Apr 4 '14 at 15:07
    
You still haven't told us what the error was. –  Andy Lester Apr 4 '14 at 15:08
    
@AndyLester: I don't get the desired output. Instead I kept getting Use of uninitialized value $tmp1[3] in join or string at replace.pl line 4. –  biobudhan Apr 4 '14 at 15:10
    
I've edited your question to show the error. –  Andy Lester Apr 4 '14 at 15:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

perl solution:

use strict;
use warnings;

# Create your filehandles
open my $REF , '<', 'ref.tab'  or die $!;
open my $DATA, '<', 'data.tab' or die $!;

my %replaceid;

# Initialize your hashmap from ref file
while (<$REF>) {
    my ($k, $v) = split /\s+/;
    $replaceid{$k} = $v;
}

# Read the data file
while(<$DATA>) {
    my @tmp = split /\s+/;
    next unless exists $replaceid {$tmp[3]};   # If 4th fld exists in hash
    $tmp[3] = $replaceid{$tmp[3]} or next;     # Replace your current line with hash value
    print join("\t", @tmp), "\n";              # Print your current line   
}

close $REF;
close $DATA;

awk solution:

awk 'NR==FNR{a[$1]=$2;next}{$4=(a[$4])?a[$4]:""}1' OFS="\t" ref.tab data.tab
  • We read the ref.tab file completely and load it in a hash having column 1 as key and column 2 as value.
  • Once the ref.tab file is read, we move to data.tab file and substitute the 4th column with hash value
share|improve this answer

Value in 4-th column is $tmp1[3], not $tmp1[4]

use strict;
use warnings;

# Define file containing the reference values:
open my $DFILE, '<', 'ref.tab' or die $!;

my %replaceid;
while (<$DFILE>) {
    my ($k, $v) = split;
    $replaceid{$k} = $v;
}
close $DFILE;

# print "$_ $replaceid{$_}\n" for (keys %replaceid);

# Define the file in which column values are to be replaced:
open my $SFILE, "<", 'data.tab' or die $!; 

local $" = "\t"; #"
while(<$SFILE>) {
  my @tmp1 = split;
  $tmp1[3] = $replaceid{ $tmp1[3] } // qq{"no '$tmp1[3]' key in \$replaceid!"};
  # tab separated output of @tmp1 array, thanks to $" var set above
  print "@tmp1\n";
}
close $SFILE;
share|improve this answer
    
ref.tab outputs this: A a B b C c D d –  biobudhan Apr 4 '14 at 13:43
    
No. they are separated by new lines (ie) A (tab space) a (new line)B (tab space) b and so on –  biobudhan Apr 4 '14 at 13:50
    
@biobudhan eval.in/131795, btw. what is output of perl -lne 'print "|$_|"' ref.tab? –  Сухой27 Apr 4 '14 at 13:56
    
the output of perl -lne 'print "|$_|"' ref.tab is: |A a| |B b| –  biobudhan Apr 4 '14 at 13:58
    
Yes, the A\ta are separated by B\tb by new line –  biobudhan Apr 4 '14 at 14:05

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