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Often times, I find myself navigating very deep into a directory and wanting to open the graphical window (nautilus) for various reasons. So the question is simple:

After doing,

cd sampledirectory  
cd sampledirectory2 

How can I open this location in a GUI?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I assume Gnome with Nautilus:

nautilus .

To open in the current directory.

Replace nautilus with whichever File Manager you use (Dolphin, etc).

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Cool! I kept trying nautilus and it opened the window in my home directory. Help didn't provide much either.. Thanks a lot! –  Legend Feb 18 '10 at 5:17
    
@Nick I will check this. mostly i use ALT + F2 command to go to specific directory. –  Adeel Feb 18 '10 at 5:19
    
@Adeel: Yes. That works but I wanted it to instantly open the current location in a GUI file manager... –  Legend Feb 18 '10 at 5:20
    
Awesome!! :D. I never thought DOT will open the current dir! –  sk8terboi87 ツ Apr 9 '13 at 16:01
nautilus --no-desktop . &
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Actually typing nautilus . opens the window in the background without keeping the terminal busy... Thanks anyways.. –  Legend Feb 18 '10 at 5:18
3  
Not in all situations. Such as if you don't normally run nautilus. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 18 '10 at 6:12
    
Oh... I didn't know that.. Thanks for the clarification... –  Legend Feb 18 '10 at 17:23

nautilus .


I've done this a zillion times.

Here is how I do it on every system:

Mac:

#!/bin/sh
open /System/Library/CoreServices/Finder.app ${1:-.}

Linux / BSD, if Gnome:

#!/bin/sh
nautilus ${1:-.}

Windows ... Cygwin ...

#!/bin/sh
[ $# -eq 1 ] && exec explorer "$(cygpath -w "$1")"
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The most portable way should be using freedesktop's xdg-utils xdg-open. For example

   $ xdg-open .

this has the advantage of choosing from your desktop preferences the tool to open different file types, like for example

   $ xdg-open ~/Documents/mypresentation.odp

or

   $ xdg-open ~/Pictures/mypic.png
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This is very useful too... Thanks! –  Legend Feb 18 '10 at 17:24
    
xdg-open doesn't quite work for, say, highlighting a file within a directory, but nautilus does (or correct me if I'm wrong...) –  rogerdpack Jun 21 '12 at 22:32

Similar to DigitalRoss' comment, on a Mac you can add the following to your ~/.bash_profile:

alias finder="open /System/Library/CoreServices/Finder.app ${1:-.}"

then, from any Terminal window session, you can simply type:

finder

to launch the Finder at your current location.

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Surprised that you all not mention:

( dolphin . & )

Detaching programs form the terminal is always key for me because when you close the console window after just do

dolphin . &

... it will also close your file manager or whatever program you started this way together with it and probably nobody wants this.

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