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I attempted to create a recursive function to iterate through a data set, but it does not properly break out and is infinite

jsfiddle of code shown

var data = [{a: 1,b: 1}, {a: 2,b: 2}],z = 0;

function some(a, b, cbk) {
    console.log(a + ':' +b);
    cbk();
}

function main() {
    var cbk = function () {
        if (z < data.length) {
            main();
        } else {
            console.log('end');
        }
        z++;
    }
    some(data[z].a, data[z].b, cbk);
}
main();

Why is this an infinite loop?

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You're calling some() without any parameters in the cbk function. –  Smeegs Apr 4 '14 at 14:37
    
atleast leave a comment before downvoting. –  Joey Salac Hipolito Apr 4 '14 at 14:37
    
@Smeegs that should be main, sorry –  Joey Salac Hipolito Apr 4 '14 at 14:38
    
This looks like a bad way to write what you want to achieve. Your recursion looks like main -> some -> cbk (1) -> main -> some -> cbk (2) -> ... -> main -> some -> cbk (n) -> end, i.e. not only are you looping through 3 functions, but one of those three (cbk) is re-created each iteration until you have n copies. You don't need to recurse at all to do this so I hope it's just a test for yourself. –  Paul S. Apr 4 '14 at 15:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

jsFiddle Demo

There were a few things going on here that made the recursion fail involving the iteration control. By starting with z = 0, and comparing to .length, z will need to be pre-increased prior to the conditional check if( z < .length ).

The reason is that following the path of recursion, z is never incremented and so the recursion is infinite causing a lockout of the page. So, z needs to be handled before the recursive call takes place, preferably before the comparison to the .length.

In your original version, this was taking place not only after the if statement, but also after the recursive call. Fixing this iterator will fix your recursion.

if (++z < data.length) {
share|improve this answer

I was told to undelete this because it's answerable although I am gaining much hate, I found have noticed my mistake and did this.

var data = [{
    a: 1,
    b: 1
}, {
    a: 2,
    b: 2
}],
    z = 0;

function some(a, b, cbk) {
    console.log(a + ':' +b);
    cbk();
}

function main() {
    var cbk = function () {
        z++;
        if (z < data.length) {
            main();
        } else {
            console.log('end');
        }

    }
    some(data[z].a, data[z].b, cbk);

}

main();
share|improve this answer

I don't know how fluent at reading code you are, but I've tried to break down the concept of linear recursion into as generic a way as I could imagine

function recurse(data, /* fns */ step, worker, joiner, /* vals */ first, empty) {
    function recursor(data, current) {
        var result = worker(data, current), // do work with current iteration
            next = step(data, current);     // find the next iteration
        if (next !== null)                  // if found
            return joiner(                  //   return
                result,                     //   the result from this time
                recursor(data, next)        //   + the result from next time
            );
        else                                // if not found
            return joiner(                  //   return
                result,                     //   just this result
                empty // this join is helpful for joining arrays/objects/etc
            );
    }
    return recursor(data, first); // start it
}

So, an example based on what you were doing

var data = [{a: 1,b: 1}, {a: 2,b: 2}];

function init(data) {
    function logger(data, i) { // a function describing what to do
        var e = data[i];       // with this iteration
        console.log(e.a + ':' + e.b);
        return e.a;
    }
    function step(data, i) {   // a function describing how to find
        i = i + 1;             // the next iteration
        if (i < data.length) return i;
        return null; // null = end
    }
    function add(a, b) {       // a function describing how to join
        return a + b;          // two iterations together
    }
    return recurse(data, step, logger, add, 0, 0);
}

init(data); // run everything safely in it's own closure
/*
  1:1
  2:2
  3 // === 1 + 2 + 0, from return of logger and result of add
*/

Of course in practice you could do a lot of this in-place rather than a function for each thing, and the step can usually be simplified so much that you don't need to var for result and next because you don't have to cache anything for an if test.

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