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Let me start by stating my intent. In the olden (C++) days, we would have code like:

class C
{
public:
  enum {SOME_VALUE=27};
};

Then we could use SOME_VALUE throughout our code as a compile time constant and wherever the compiler would see C::SOME_VALUE, it would just insert the literal 27.

Now days, it is seems more acceptable to change that code to something like:

class C
{
public:
  static constexpr int SOME_VALUE=27;
};

This looks much cleaner, gives SOME_VALUE a well defined type and seems to be the preferred approach as of C++11. The (unforseen at least for me) problem is that this also causes scenarios where SOME_VALUE needs to be made external. That is, in some cpp file somewhere, we need to add:

constexpr int C::SOME_VALUE; // Now C::SOME_VALUE has external linkage

The cases that cause this seem to be when const references to SOME_VALUE are used, which happens quite often in C++ Standard Library code (See the example at the bottom of this question). I am using gcc 4.7.2 as my compiler by the way.

Due to this dilemma, I am forced to revert back to defining SOME_VALUE as an enum (i.e., old school) in order to avoid having to add a definition to a cpp file for some, but not all of my static constexpr member variables. Isn't there some way to tell the compiler that constexpr int SOME_VALUE=27 means that SOME_VALUE should be treated only as a compile time constant and never an object with external linkage? If you see a const reference used with it, create a temporary. If you see its address taken, generate a compile time error if that's what's needed, because it's a compile time constant and nothing more.

Here is some seemingly benign sample code that causes us to need to add the definition for SOME_VALUE in a cpp file (once again, tested with gcc 4.7.2):

#include <vector>

class C
{
public:
  static constexpr int SOME_VALUE=5;
};

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> iv;

  iv.push_back(C::SOME_VALUE); // Will cause an undefined reference error
                               // at link time, because the compiler isn't smart
                               // enough to treat C::SOME_VALUE as the literal 5
                               // even though it's obvious at compile time
}

Adding the following line to the code at file scope will resolve the error:

constexpr int C::SOME_VALUE;
share|improve this question
1  
I'm really confused by "when the address of SOME_VALUE is taken, ... I am forced to revert back to defining SOME_VALUE as an enum". Enumerators are prvalues, you can't take their addresses either. – Ben Voigt Apr 4 '14 at 16:13
2  
You may use static constexpr int SOME_VALUE() { return 5; }... – Jarod42 Apr 4 '14 at 16:17
7  
BTW, you can now give enumerators a well-defined type: enum : int { SOME_VALUE = 5 }; – Ben Voigt Apr 4 '14 at 16:18
3  
From similar questions and answers like [1], [2], [3], I have collected here a number of workarounds. The most concise is to use +SOME_VALUE to get a temporary. – iavr Apr 4 '14 at 16:56
6  
All of these workarounds indicate to me that using an enum for integral constants is better than a static constexpr. There are fewer surprises (at least one anyway). Bonus for working with older C++ and C, too. – Michael Burr Apr 4 '14 at 21:07

From the C++ standard N3797 S3.5/2-3

A name is said to have linkage when it might denote the same object, reference, function, type, template, namespace or value as a name introduced by a declaration in another scope:

— When a name has external linkage , the entity it denotes can be referred to by names from scopes of other translation units or from other scopes of the same translation unit.

— When a name has internal linkage , the entity it denotes can be referred to by names from other scopes in the same translation unit.

— When a name has no linkage , the entity it denotes cannot be referred to by names from other scopes.

A name having namespace scope (3.3.6) has internal linkage if it is the name of

— a variable, function or function template that is explicitly declared static; or,

— a non-volatile variable that is explicitly declared const or constexpr and neither explicitly declared extern nor previously declared to have external linkage; or

— a data member of an anonymous union.

My reading is that in the following code:

public:
  static constexpr int SOME_VALUE=5;
  constexpr int SOME_VALUE=5;
};
static constexpr int SOME_VALUE=5;
constexpr int SOME_VALUE=5;

All 4 instances of SOME_VALUE have internal linkage. They should link with a reference to SOME_VALUE in the same translation unit and not be visible elsewhere.

Obviously the first one is a declaration and not a definition. It needs a definition within the same translation unit. If GCC says so and MSVC does not, then MSVC is wrong.

For the purposes of replacing an enum, number 2 should work fine. It still has internal linkage without the static keyword.

[Edited in response to comment]

share|improve this answer
    
@dyp: Thanks! Must have been a late night. See edit. – david.pfx Apr 15 '14 at 23:08
    
The code you show is not enough to determine whether the linkage will be external or not. You need to pass that value by reference to some function as in my example, for the linkage to become external. – Michael Goldshteyn Apr 16 '14 at 15:44
    
@dyp: Ouch! The second sentence was OK. Fixed. – david.pfx Apr 16 '14 at 23:18
    
I don't think linkage is actually a problem here. Linkage is a property of a name. As I said, binding some static data member SOME_VALUE that doesn't have a definition to a reference violates the ODR, which isn't a linkage issue. You can very well use names that do not have linkage (like automatic variables) or internal linkage (like static global variables) as arguments for push_back, for example. – dyp Apr 16 '14 at 23:22
    
"which isn't a linkage issue" <- that might be a bit confusing, because the linker fails to find a definition for the variable in the OP. What I mean here is linkage as the visibility of a name, as defined in the Standard. – dyp Apr 16 '14 at 23:27

You have three options here:

  1. If your class is template, then put the definition of static member in header itself. Compiler is required to identify it as one definition only across multiple translation units (see [basic.def.odr]/5)

  2. If your class is non-template you can easily put it in source file

  3. Alternatively declare constexpr static member function getSomeValue():

    class C
    {
    public:
        static constexpr int getSomeValue() { return 27; }
    };
    
share|improve this answer

you can do this

class C
{
public:
  static const int SOME_VALUE=5;
};

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> iv;
  iv.push_back(C::SOME_VALUE); 
}

This is not even C++11, just C++98

share|improve this answer
1  
Of course you can, and it won't compile, for exactly the same reason as OP's code. – Frax Apr 7 '14 at 20:10
    
It compiles and works, VS 2012, as it always has (I using this for years). See here stackoverflow.com/questions/2605520/… also here publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/lnxpcomp/v8v101/… and here devx.com/tips/Tip/5602 – Ophir Gvirtzer Apr 8 '14 at 9:02
    
In general, in C++98 static class members need to be defined in one translation unit, unless they are const – Ophir Gvirtzer Apr 8 '14 at 9:08
2  
The fact that this works in VS2012, does not make it compatible with all other compilers (e.g., gcc). In general, Microsoft has been rather lax in what it's compiler deems to be an error (i.e., an accomodative stance with respect to the developer rather than strict standard compliance). Additionally, if a by value version of push_back is provided in std::vector, as a specialization for integral and/or small POD types, the linker error can be eliminated. Whether or not such an implementation would violate the standard may be open to interpretation. – Michael Goldshteyn Apr 8 '14 at 13:16
1  
Michael, it's the other way around, in this matter VS follows the standard, while gcc doesn't. I found this in the standard 9.4.2/4 - If a static data member is of const integral or const enumeration type, its declaration in the class definition can specify a constant-initializer which shall be an integral constant expression (5.19). In that case, the member can appear in integral constant expressions. The member shall still be defined in a namespace scope if it is used in the program and the namespace scope definition shall not contain an initializer. – Ophir Gvirtzer Apr 8 '14 at 14:30

Nowadays, the preferred way is:

enum class : int C { SOME_VALUE = 5 };
share|improve this answer
1  
But now you have to explicitly cast when you need the int value. – Chnossos Apr 24 '14 at 21:02
    
This gives the enum a type as mentioned in passing by the OP but does not address their primary question, which was whether it's possible to avoid external linkage when using static const[expr]' instead of enum. – underscore_d Dec 20 '15 at 11:51

I'd go with enum class:

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/enum

http://www.stroustrup.com/C++11FAQ.html#enum

From the first link:

enum class Color { RED, GREEN=20, BLUE};
Color r = Color::BLUE;
switch(r) {
    case Color::RED : std::cout << "red\n"; break;
    case Color::GREEN : std::cout << "green\n"; break;
    case Color::BLUE : std::cout << "blue\n"; break;
}
// int n = r; // error: no scoped enum to int conversion
int n = static_cast<int>(r); // OK, n = 21
share|improve this answer
    
This gives the enum a type as mentioned in passing by the OP but does not address their primary question, which was whether it's possible to avoid external linkage when using static const[expr]' instead of enum. – underscore_d Dec 20 '15 at 11:50

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