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I have two Java implementations of a bi-directional bubble sort (cocktail sort) designed to sort a list of n integers.

  • The first one is a "vanilla" cocktail sort.
  • The second one increments a left or right buffer after each pass, because after each left or right pass, exactly one item is guaranteed to be sorted.

Strangley, the second implementation is much slower (~15 and ~18 seconds respectively for 100k integers).

Sample one: ("vanilla")

int n = 100000; //length of array, largest element in array

        //create an array with one million random integers
        int[] array = new int[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) //set each item...
        { 
            array[i] = (int)((Math.random() * n) + 1); //...to a random int 1 to n inclusive
        }

        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis(); // start timer

        boolean changed = true; //to flag if any changes were made
        int a; // to hold each of two items
        int b;
        long totalPasses = 0; // total passes over the array
        long totalSwaps = 0; // total number of times two elements were swapped

        do
        {
            changed = false;

            if (totalPasses % 2 == 0) // pass from left to right
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < (array.length-1); i++)
                { 
                    a = array[i];
                    b = array[i+1];

                    if (a > b) // if the two selected elements are not in order
                    {
                        array[i] = b; // swap the elements
                        array[i+1] = a;
                        changed = true; // flag that a change has been made
                        totalSwaps++; // update the number of changes made
                    }
                }
            }
            else // pass from right to left
            {
                for (int i = (array.length-1); i > 0; i--)
                { 
                    a = array[i-1];
                    b = array[i];

                    if (a > b) // if the two selected elements are not in order
                    {
                        array[i-1] = b; // swap the elements
                        array[i] = a;
                        changed = true; // flag that a change has been made
                        totalSwaps++; // update the number of changes made
                    }
                }
            } // end sorting for this pass

        totalPasses++;
        } while (changed);

        long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

        System.out.println();
        System.out.println("Finished sorting " + n + " integers. (" + (double)(endTime-startTime)/1000 + " seconds to make " + totalSwaps + " swaps over " + totalPasses + " passes)");

Sample two: (with incrementing buffer)

int n = 100000; //length of array, largest element in array

        //create an array with one million random integers
        int[] array = new int[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < array.length; i++) //set each item...
        { 
            array[i] = (int)((Math.random() * n) + 1); //...to a random int 1 to n inclusive
        }

        /*
         * at the end of each left to right pass, increment the right buffer
         * at the end of each right to left pass, increment the left buffer
         */

        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis(); // start timer

        boolean changed = true; //to flag if any changes were made
        int a; // to hold each of two items
        int b;
        int leftBuffer = 0; // distance from each side that is already sorted
        int rightBuffer = 0;
        long totalPasses = 0; // total passes over the array
        long totalSwaps = 0; // total number of times two elements were swapped

        do // main sorting loop
        {
            changed = false;

            if (totalPasses % 2 == 0) // pass from left to right
            {
                for (int i = leftBuffer; i < ((array.length-1)-rightBuffer); i++)
                { 
                    a = array[i];
                    b = array[i+1];

                    if (a > b) // if the two selected elements are not in order
                    {
                        array[i] = b; // swap the elements
                        array[i+1] = a;
                        changed = true; // flag that a change has been made
                        totalSwaps++; // update the number of changes made
                    }
                }
                rightBuffer++; // increment the cover for
            }
            else // pass from right to left
            {
                for (int i = ((array.length-1)-rightBuffer); i > leftBuffer; i--)
                { 
                    a = array[i-1];
                    b = array[i];

                    if (a > b) // if the two selected elements are not in order
                    {
                        array[i-1] = b; // swap the elements
                        array[i] = a;
                        changed = true; // flag that a change has been made
                        totalSwaps++; // update the number of changes made
                    }
                }
                leftBuffer++;
            } // end sorting for this pass

            totalPasses++;
        } while (changed); // end sorting loop

        long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

        System.out.println();
        System.out.println("Finished sorting " + n + " integers. (" + (double)(endTime-startTime)/1000 + " seconds to make " + totalSwaps + " swaps over " + totalPasses + " passes)");

Can someone explain to this Java noob what is happening?

share|improve this question
1  
Are guesses legit? ....the for loops in the first are dependent upon values that do not change in the loop. That is, the compiler knows how many loops it will make before runtime. In the second, this isn't true, so calculations are redone after each loop. –  deanosaur Apr 4 at 16:34
2  
Please see this question on benchmarking Java code. In short, there are so many factors that might affect the times you're seeing that it's impossible to draw any conclusions. –  Alex Apr 4 at 16:36
    
deanosaur: Thank you, that does make sense. @Alex: Thank you for the link, I'll take a good look at it. –  Jim V Apr 4 at 16:42

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