Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When I write this program in Turbo C++, it works fine. However, when I write in CodeBlocks, Xcode, I get an error regarding char, and I don't know why. I thought I could just declare something like char* name to use as a string.

This program is about Multilevel Inheritance. Passing Interest rate and Period to the functions, it will display the output according to the Account type.`

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

class banktype1{
public:
    char *accountType;
    float interestAmt,depositAmt,period,totalAmt;
public:
    void interestCal(char *x,int y,int z){
        accountType=&x;
        depositAmt=y;
        period=z;
        if(accountType=="A")
           interestAmt=depositAmt*0.5*period;
        else if(accountType=="B")
           interestAmt=depositAmt*0.15*period;
        else if(accountType=="C")
           interestAmt=depositAmt*0.25*period;
    }   
};

class banktype2:public banktype1{
public:
    void displayData(){
        cout<<interestAmt<<"\n"<<depositAmt<<endl;
        cout<<"Total"<<interestAmt+depositAmt;
    }
};
class banktype3:public banktype2{

};
int main(){
    banktype3 b1;
    b1.interestCal("A",1000,12);
    b1.interestCal("B",1000,12);
    b1.interestCal("C",1000,12);
    b1.displayData();
    return 0;
}

At the place of calling functions, I'm getting this notification:

conversion from string literal to char * is deprecated.

and also at the place of if condition I'm getting:

Result of comparison against a string literal is unspecified (use strncmp instead)

share|improve this question
    
This code has a lot of errors. It's hard to help you since you didn't ask a question. Do you understand what those error messages mean? If so, what's stopping you from fixing them? If not, you should say so -- otherwise we don't know what help you need. – David Schwartz Apr 4 '14 at 16:47
1  
Turbo C++ is outdated. Its last release is from 2006. It is inexplicable to me why a lecturer would use it in 2014 to teach C++. – Christian Hackl Apr 4 '14 at 16:49
    
@DavidSchwartz hi. i was having unclear image about using char and pincers passing in functions parameters. after reading some answers. e.g.: after deleting 'const', and assigning * at the if comparison i got it worked. – Im Batman Apr 4 '14 at 16:51
    
So can you edit your question so that it actually contains your question? The more precise you are in explaining what you are unclear about, the more likely is is that you will get an answer that clarifies the specific things you need. – David Schwartz Apr 4 '14 at 16:52
1  
@ChristianHackl sadly, having teachers who have not updated their knowledge since they finished the college is pretty common. I'm currently studing CS on the university, and thats what I see every day: Stupid teachers doing stupid things (Using Borland C++, using C++ as Java, i.e. foo* f = new foo;, etc). – Manu343726 Apr 4 '14 at 16:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

String literals in C++ have types of constant charater arrrays.

But in any case the function definition

void interestCal(char *x,int y,int z){
    accountType=&x;
    depositAmt=y;
    period=z;
    if(accountType=="A"){
    interestAmt=depositAmt*0.5*period;
    }else if(accountType=="B"){
    interestAmt=depositAmt*0.05*period;
    }else if(accountType=="C"){
    interestAmt=depositAmt*0.05*period;
    }
}

is wrong.

As the compiler warns the first parameter should have type const char * if you pass string literals as arguments to the function.

This statement

    accountType=&x;

is invalid. Thje right operand &x has type char ** while the left operand has type char * because accountType is declared as

char *accountType;

This

    if(accountType=="A"){

and other if else statements are also invalid. Here you are tryying to compare pointers.

It would be much simpler and more correctly if you defined accountType as

char accountType;

and the function would look as

void interestCal( char x, int y, int z )
{
    accountType = x;
    depositAmt = y;
    period = z;
    if ( accountType == 'A' )
    {
       interestAmt = depositAmt * 0.5 * period;
    }
    else if ( accountType == 'B' )
    {
       interestAmt = depositAmt * 0.05 * period;
    }
    else if( accountType == 'C' )
    {
       interestAmt = depositAmt * 0.05 * period;
    }
}

and it would be called from main as

b1.interestCal( 'A', 1000, 12 );
b1.interestCal( 'B', 1000, 12 );
b1.interestCal( 'C', 1000, 12 );

Also if indeed the three if-else statements have the same compound statement then they could be rewritten as one if statement

    if ( accountType == 'A' || accountType == 'B' || accountType == 'C')
    {
       interestAmt = depositAmt * 0.05 * period;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Just a minor point: It would make more sense to declare the function as interestCal( char accountType, int depositAmt, int period ). – markgz Apr 4 '14 at 17:08
    
@Vlad from Moscow Ah yes Thanks. its worked. i don't know why then our stupid teacher always use pointer thing. when we passing char in functions – Im Batman Apr 4 '14 at 17:12

Use std::string instead of the old C strings, which are just arrays of characters.

Note that the equality operator just compares the addresses of the arrays in the case of C strings, but its overloaded to do string comparison in the case of std::string. (So your elseif code should use std::string).

Also note that when using C strings, you should use const char*, never char*.

The solution is simple (And remember it as a good rule of thumb): Except in rare cases where its neccesary, always use C++ features instead of its C equivalents, in this case just use std::string. Its dessigned to make your life easier.

share|improve this answer

Ah It Worked. after making some changes according to answers. deleting const . and changing if(accountType=='A') to if(*accountType=='A')

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
using namespace std;

class banktype1{
public:
    char *accountType;
    float interestAmt,depositAmt,period,totalAmt;
public:
    void interestCal(char x,int y,int z){
        accountType=&x;
        depositAmt=y;
        period=z;
        if(*accountType=='A'){
            interestAmt=depositAmt*0.5*period;
        }else if(*accountType=='B'){
            interestAmt=depositAmt*0.05*period;
        }else if(*accountType=='C'){
            interestAmt=depositAmt*0.05*period;
        }

    }

};
class banktype2:public banktype1{
public:
    void displayData(){
        cout<<interestAmt<<"\n"<<depositAmt<<endl;
        cout<<"Total"<<interestAmt+depositAmt;
    }
};
class banktype3:public banktype2{

};
int main(){
    banktype3 b1;
    b1.interestCal('A',1000,12);
    b1.interestCal('B',1000,12);
    b1.interestCal('C',1000,12);
    b1.displayData();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't do that: You are comparing the first character of the array with a character, not comparing the strings. Please read my answer. – Manu343726 Apr 4 '14 at 16:51
    
This is hardly an answer. You didn't even explain what made the code work! – 0x499602D2 Apr 4 '14 at 16:51
    
@Manu343726 . i have used String before. but our lecture always do using char . why above code is wrong. ? – Im Batman Apr 4 '14 at 17:04
2  
Well, you have been advised, (regarding on my comments, I have demostrated that your teacher is stupid). Why is wrong? Because C strings are just plain arrays of chars. Remember that. So if you compare them you are not comparing the strings, you are comparing the pointers. Your workaround (Dereferencing the first element of the array) is just a pretty odd workaround to that behaviour, because you are only comparing the first character. – Manu343726 Apr 4 '14 at 17:07
1  
@NadimFarhat yes. thats what i thought. now I'm getting idea about pointers and how its working.. – Im Batman Apr 4 '14 at 17:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.