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What is an efficient algorithm to remove all duplicates in a string? For example if I have aaaabbbccdbdbcd, I will get back abcd.

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Which language is this for? –  astander Feb 18 '10 at 7:11
    
Do you need to maintain / impose order on the result? –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Feb 18 '10 at 7:13
    
any, say python. no order –  SuperString Feb 18 '10 at 7:20

15 Answers 15

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You use a hashtable to store currently discovered keys (access O(1)) and then loop through the array. If a character is in the hashtable, discard it. If it isn't add it to the hashtable and a result string.

Overall: O(n) time (and space).

The naive solution is to search for the character is the result string as you process each one. That O(n2).

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+1, Or if they have accss to it HashSet msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb495294.aspx –  astander Feb 18 '10 at 7:14
1  
If you have a large string compared the possible # vakues of the characters (eg like if it is ASCII), you might use a =n array of bools instead on a hashtable –  Ritsaert Hornstra Feb 18 '10 at 8:10
1  
The best case to retrieve a value from hashtable is O(1) and the worst case O(n). The overall worst case complexity for the algorithm is O(n^2). –  Thomas Jung Feb 18 '10 at 8:47
    
that is irrelavent in this case as you by definition of the algo have either 0 or 1 item for each hash key –  jk. Feb 18 '10 at 9:07
    
@jk The hashtable has always 0 or 1 entries for a key. The worst case O(n) is that all n values are in one bucket. –  Thomas Jung Feb 18 '10 at 9:47

This closely related to the question: Detecting repetition with infinite input.

The hashtable approach may not be optimal depending on your input. Hashtables have a certain amount of overhead (buckets, entry objects). It is huge overhead compared to the actual stored char. (If you target environment is Java it is even worse as the HashMap is of type Map<Character,?>.) The worse case runtime for a Hashtable access is O(n) due to collisions.

You need only 8kb too represent all 2-byte unicode characters in a plain BitSet. This may be optimized if your input character set is more restricted or by using a compressed BitSets (as long as you have a sparse BitSet). The runtime performance will be favorable for a BitSet it is O(1).

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I am afraid to mention that you are mixing (somehow) concepts and implementations. I view the fact that you are using a BitSet to implement your own HashTable as a proof that the HashTable is a perfectly viable solution. –  Matthieu M. Feb 19 '10 at 15:34
1  
@Matthieu Using a Hashtable or a BitSet has certain trade-offs. The hashtable works best for small sets of characters. The BitSet works best when the number of characters is large or can be restricted to a known range. A BitSet is not a Hashtable. The Hashtable here is used as a Set as someone mentioned. The BitSet is used analogous. If you can replace one with the other does not mean that they are equally good solutions. –  Thomas Jung Feb 19 '10 at 15:54

In Python

>>> ''.join(set("aaaabbbccdbdbcd"))
'acbd'

If the order needs to be preserved

>>> q="aaaabbbccdbdbcd"                    # this one is not
>>> ''.join(sorted(set(q),key=q.index))    # so efficient
'abcd'

or

>>> S=set()
>>> res=""
>>> for c in "aaaabbbccdbdbcd":
...  if c not in S:
...   res+=c
...   S.add(c)
... 
>>> res
'abcd'

or

>>> S=set()
>>> L=[]
>>> for c in "aaaabbbccdbdbcd":
...  if c not in S:
...   L.append(c)
...   S.add(c)
... 
>>> ''.join(L)
'abcd'

In python3.1

>>> from collections import OrderedDict
>>> ''.join(list(OrderedDict((c,0) for c in "aaaabbbccdbdbcd").keys()))
'abcd'
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I knew set would be awesome for this, but I'm new to python and was trying to figure out how to join them while you posted this... Now I know! –  Carson Myers Feb 18 '10 at 7:55
    
This doesn't preserve order. –  recursive Feb 24 '10 at 23:50
    
@recursive, I added some order preserving options –  gnibbler Feb 25 '10 at 0:17

Keep an array of 256 "seen" booleans, one for each possible character. Stream your string. If you haven't seen the character before, output it and set the "seen" flag for that character.

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1  
It has not been told what coding is used, though –  skwllsp Feb 18 '10 at 7:19

You Can Do this in O(n) only if you are using HashTable. Code is given below Please Note- It is assumed that number of possible characters in input string are 256

void removeDuplicates(char *str)
{
 int len = strlen(str); //Gets the length of the String
 int count[256] = {0};  //initializes all elements as zero
 int i;
     for(i=0;i<len;i++)
     {
        count[str[i]]++;  
        if(count[str[i]] == 1)
          printf("%c",str[i]);                  
     }     
}
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PHP algorythm - O(n):

function remove_duplicate_chars($str) {
    if (2 > $len = strlen($str)) {
        return $str;
    }
    $flags = array_fill(0,256,false);
    $flags[ord($str[0])]=true;
    $j = 1;
    for ($i=1; $i<$len; $i++) {
        $ord = ord($str[$i]);
        if (!$flags[$ord]) {
            $str[$j] = $str[$i];
            $j++;
            $flags[$ord] = true;
        }
    }
    if ($j<$i) { //if duplicates removed
        $str = substr($str,0,$j);
    }
    return $str;
}

echo remove_duplicate_chars('aaaabbbccdbdbcd'); // result: 'abcd'
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#include <iostream>
#include<string>
using namespace std;
#define MAX_SIZE 256

int main()
{
    bool arr[MAX_SIZE] = {false};

    string s;
    cin>>s;
    int k = 0;

    for(int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++)
    {
        while(arr[s[i]] == true && i < s.length())
        {
            i++;
        }
        if(i < s.length())
        {
            s[k]    = s[i];
            arr[s[k]] = true;
            k++;
        }
    }
    s.resize(k);

    cout << s<< endl; 

    return 0;
}
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What does the arr[s[i]] == true mean? –  REACHUS Nov 19 '13 at 20:47
    
Just having arr[s[i]] there would do too. Is that what you meant? –  TheMan Nov 19 '13 at 20:54
    
arr[s[i]] is what I'm interested in - do I understand correctly that you use char (which is an int) to index the array? –  REACHUS Nov 19 '13 at 20:58
    
Yes, that's right and it should work. What's the issue with that? –  TheMan Nov 23 '13 at 21:21
  string newString = new string("aaaaabbbbccccdddddd".ToCharArray().Distinct().ToArray());   

or

 char[] characters = "aaaabbbccddd".ToCharArray();
                string result = string.Empty ;
                foreach (char c in characters)
                {
                    if (result.IndexOf(c) < 0)
                        result += c.ToString();
                }
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1  
O(n^2) isn't very efficient... (once the data set gets big enough). For small strings this is probably faster than a hashset based lookup though –  Rob Fonseca-Ensor Feb 18 '10 at 7:14
    
i agree , what about the new one ? –  Amgad Fahmi Feb 18 '10 at 7:23
    
String concatenation in a loop will be slower than the searching of the character within the string... –  cjk Feb 18 '10 at 8:53

In C++, you'd probably use an std::set:

std::string input("aaaabbbccddd");
std::set<char> unique_chars(input.begin(), input.end());

In theory you could use std::unordered_set instead of std::set, which should give O(N) expected overall complexity (though O(N2) worst case), where this one is O(N lg M) (where N=number of total characters, M=number of unique characters). Unless you have long strings with a lot of unique characters, this version will probably be faster though.

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You can sort the string and then remove the duplicate characters.

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s = "aaaabbbccdbdbcd";

    std::sort(s.begin(), s.end());
    s.erase(std::unique(s.begin(), s.end()), s.end());

    std::cout << s << std::endl;
}
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This sounds like a perfect use for automata.

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C++ - O(n) time, O(1) space, and the output is sorted.

std::string characters = "aaaabbbccddd";
std::vector<bool> seen(std::numeric_limits<char>::max()-std::numeric_limits<char>::min());

for(std::string::iterator it = characters.begin(), endIt = characters.end(); it != endIt; ++it) {
  seen[(*it)-std::numeric_limits<char>::min()] = true;
}

characters = "";
for(char ch = std::numeric_limits<char>::min(); ch != std::numeric_limits<char>::max(); ++ch) {
  if( seen[ch-std::numeric_limits<char>::min()] ) {
    characters += ch;
  }
}
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O(1) space??? I see a vector of bools.. Isnt is same as an array of bools of 256 characters?? –  letsc Aug 10 '11 at 4:58
    
@smartmuki: It's O(1) space because the size of the vector<bool> does not vary according to the size of the input - it's 256 bools no matter what the input is. –  Joe Gauterin Aug 10 '11 at 12:34

in C this is how i did it: O(n) in time since we only have one for loop.

void remDup(char *str)
{
    int flags[256] = { 0 };

    for(int i=0; i<(int)strlen(str); i++) {
        if( flags[str[i]] == 0 )
            printf("%c", str[i]);

        flags[str[i]] = 1;
    }
}
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import java.util.HashSet;

public class RemoveDup {

    public static String Duplicate()
    {
        HashSet h = new HashSet();
        String value = new String("aaaabbbccdbdbcd");
        String finalString = new String();
        int stringLength = value.length();
        for (int i=0;i<=stringLength-1;i++)
        {
            if(h.add(value.charAt(i)))
            {
                finalString = finalString + (value.charAt(i));
            }


        }
        return finalString;

    }
public static void main(String[] args) {


        System.out.println(Duplicate());
    }
}
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get a list of first 26 prime numbers.. Now you can map each character (a,b,c,d etc) to each prime number.. (alphabetically say a=2, b=3, c=5 etc.. or depending upon relative abundance of the characters like most frequently used letter with lower prime say e=2, r=3, a=5 etc)...store that mapping in an integer array int prime[26]..

iterate through all the characters of the string

i=0;
int product = 1;
while(char[i] != null){
   if(product % prime[i] == 0)
      the character is already present delete it
   else
      product = product*prime[i];
}

this algorithm will work in O(n) time.. with O(1) space requirement It will work well when number of distinct character are less in the string... other wise product will exceed "int" range and we have to handle that case properly

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