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How can I get input from the user if they are to separate their inputs by whitespace (e.g. 1 2 3 4 5) and I want to put it in an array? Thanks.

Hmmmm. I see most of the responses are using a vector which I guess I'll have to do research on. I thought there would be a more simpler, yet possibly messier response since we haven't covered vectors like using sscanf or something. Thanks for the inputs.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
   vector<int> num;
   int t;
   while (cin >> t) {
     num.push_back(t);
   }
}
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1) You need to #include <iostream>. 2) For such a simple example I don't see the need of using namespace std, you can simply say std::vector and std::cin. 3) You don't really need the curly braces around the push_back. –  Alexandros Gezerlis Feb 18 '10 at 7:41
1  
Thank you, I've added iostream. I bet the requester is newbie, and it would be easier to mention using namespace rather than prefixing them. –  Pentium10 Feb 18 '10 at 9:31

Alternatively, and a more generic form:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
   vector<int> num;

   copy(istream_iterator<int>(cin), istream_iterator<int>(), back_inserter(num));
}
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The OP asked about putting the input into an array, not a vector (this applies to Pentium10's answer, too). –  Alexandros Gezerlis Feb 18 '10 at 7:47
    
The vector is the array in CPP. –  Pentium10 Feb 18 '10 at 9:29
    
The reason I use a vector is because you don't know how many numbers you'll need to store beforehand. If you did, it'd make sense to use an array. Otherwise, you'd need a loop to test for index out-of-range before inserting in the array. –  dirkgently Feb 18 '10 at 11:20
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <vector>

   std::istream_iterator< int > iterBegin( std::cin ), iterEnd;
   std::vector< int > vctUserInput( iterBegin, iterEnd );
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